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Lonely Planet Bolivia (Country Travel Guide) Paperback – May 1, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Country Travel Guide
  • Paperback: 392 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet; 7 edition (May 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1741049989
  • ISBN-13: 978-1741049985
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #889,829 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

For sheer global reach and dogged research, attention must be paid to Lonely Planet…' --Los Angeles Times, February 2, 2003
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Who We Are
At Lonely Planet, we see our job as inspiring and enabling travellers to connect with the world for their own benefit and for the benefit of the world at large.

What We Do
* We offer travellers the world's richest travel advice, informed by the collective wisdom of over 350 Lonely Planet authors living in 37 countries and fluent in 70 languages.
* We are relentless in finding the special, the unique and the different for travellers wherever they are.
* When we update our guidebooks, we check every listing, in person, every time.
* We always offer the trusted filter for those who are curious, open minded and independent.
* We challenge our growing community of travellers; leading debate and discussion about travel and the world.
* We tell it like it is without fear or favor in service of the travellers; not clouded by any other motive.


What We Believe
We believe that travel leads to a deeper cultural understanding and compassion and therefore a better world. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

Also, there is too much emphasis on upscale dining and accommodations.
Unsolicited Opinions
Lonely Planet is generally a great source for guidebooks, but I'm not convinced the authors returned to Bolivia to do research for this updated edition.
ginaginagina
It is really difficult to navigate and maps are just impossible to use.
MCR

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By fdoamerica on September 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
I come to Bolivia twice a year and over the past three years I have reviewed more than a dozen guides on Bolivia and this is the best guide available.

Lonely Planet guides are known for their no-nonsense, off-the-beaten-path advise. The descriptions of the towns and cities are top rate. Each area has its history and climate explained. This is one of the few guides that will give you the population and altitude of major cities and towns. Kudos!

The "must see" places are listed and explained. Trekking routes are explained and mapped! There are excellent descriptions of the seven geographical areas of Bolivia (Southern Altiplano, Central Highlands, Eastern Lowlands, Amazon Basin, etc.). The section on health is "top drawer" and needs to be read before traveling here. Sidebars, or text boxes, are found throughout the book and provide you with wonderful sources of miscellaneous information, i.e., "Bolivar - El Liberatador," "Traditional Andean Musical Instruments," etc., .

There are two other books that can enhance your time in Bolivia. The first is, William Powers' excellent and powerful account of living in Bolivia, "Whispering in the Giant's Ear" and Herbert Klien's, "A Concise Short History of Bolivia". In short, this is the most current(as of Sept. 2007) and best guide out. Strongly Recommended.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By ginaginagina on August 14, 2008
Format: Paperback
Lonely Planet is generally a great source for guidebooks, but I'm not convinced the authors returned to Bolivia to do research for this updated edition. It seems as if they just slapped on a new cover and republished the previous edition.

The restaurant recommendations (if the restaurant recommended is even still open for business, that is) lean heavily on pizza and pasta places that cater to travelers, which is fine if you have traveled all the way to Bolivia to eat pizza with a bunch of German tourists in zip-off hiking pants, but not useful at all if you want an authentic experience.

I also had a Rough Guide to Bolivia during my 5-week trip around Bolivia and found that book to be a far superior resource to LP Bolivia. The Rough Guide never disappointed in terms of hotel, restaurant, and sight seeing recommendations.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By fdoamerica on April 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
Lonely Planet guides are known for their no-nonsense, off-the-beaten-path advise, and their reliable hotel and restaurant recommendations. However, this guide does not come up to the quality level of the dozen or more Lonely Planet guides that I have reviewed.

There are various editing errors found in the guide. For example on page 27 the guide states: "Bolivia is thinly populated with just 1 million people". Wrong. Bolivia has nearly 9 million people.

Though this guide was published in 2004, most of the research was done in 2002. That means the information on accommodations and eateries is four years old and may not be reliable. For example, in Sucre, a delightful historic city, I went to nine of the twelve restaurants that Lonely Planet recommended. I found three of the restaurants permanently closed. In the other six restaurants, three had mediocre to bad food, and in the other three, the food was fair to good, but none of the restaurants had food that would justify a recommendation. The recommendations for accommodations were more useful than those for the restaurants.

The guide's section preparing you to journey to Bolivia (visas, health, getting there by air, etc.) is just bare-bones basic. Some of the maps in this guide are completely unusable, like the map for Sucre. The `Walking Tour Map' for La Paz is nothing short of a joke.

The strength of this guide is found in its excellent descriptions of the seven geographical areas the guide covers. Each area has its history and climate explained. This is one of the few guides that will give you the population and altitude of major cities and towns. Kudos! The descriptions of the towns and cities are top rate.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Matthaeus on January 9, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was the most recent guidebook for a trip to Bolivia for December 2004. (Rough Guide and Footprint were positively elderly.) I did also check out the Let's Go (2003) and Footprint (2002) from the library to bring along also. I ended up using all 3, which is to say none of the 3 had everything, and each of the 3 had some bit of useful info lacking in the others. The numbering to Sucre's map was off, as I recall (Let's Go was not much better, with south facing up and north facing down!). Also in Sucre one popular attraction (the dilapidated but worth-seeing La Glorieta mansion) was omitted in LP. I ended up using Footprint in Sucre. I found that hotels and dining that were cited in all 3 books were indeed highly recommendable. Lonely Planet seemed to have the most up to date info, which on occasion prevented some trouble. Aside from these serious errors, the 2004 Lonely Planet did definitely have a 'completely rewritten' feel as advertised. If these editorial errors could be fixed, it might just have edged out the competition. One positive it that it's thin but still manages to pack as much info as the thicker Footprint and the Let's Go (which was thick because it covers 2 other countries). None of the guides to Bolivia out there is a clear leader. Unfortunately, the best advice is to use at least 2 books in conjunction: Lonely Planet (or perhaps Let's Go) for currency and another of your choice. Maybe in 2005, some new edition will appear....
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