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Lonely Planet France Paperback – April 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 992 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet; 9 edition (April 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 174179594X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1741795943
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #537,494 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Lonely Planet's France has good practical information not found elsewhere..." -- Conde Nast Traveler, April 2006 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

Note from Publisher: This title is the previous edition of Lonely Planet's guide to France.

Lonely Planet's new edition of France may be found by typing the ISBN number, 1740599233, into the search box.

Lonely Planet's new 6th edition to France has great advice on where to enjoy the best food and wine throughout the country, perceptive History, Culture and Arts coverage for informed travel, and detailed maps and extensive coverage, including Corsica. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


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Customer Reviews

A removable color map of Paris is included with the book.
Snap, Crackle and Pop
It contains sections for each of the regions of France, and the book is highlighted with must-sees and interesting anecdotes.
Carol C.
The Lonely Planet France travel guide was very helpful to me and my wife during our recent trip to Paris.
Christopher Deweese

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

185 of 200 people found the following review helpful By Richard R. Carlton on September 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
I've made >20 visits to France all together. Here are my reviews of the best guides....to meet you r exact needs.....I hope these are helpful and that you have a great visit! I always gauge the quality of my visit by how much I remember a year later......this review is designed to help you get the guide that will be sure YOU remember your trip many years into the future. Travel Safe and enjoy yourself to the max!

Lonely Planet

Lonely Planet has City and Out To Eat Guides. They are all about the experience so they focus on doing, being, getting there, and this means they have the best detailed information, including both inexpensive and really spectacular restaurants and hotels, out-of-the-way places, weird things to see and do, the list is endless.

Frommer's

These are time tested guides that pride themselves on being updated annually. Although I think the guides below provide information that is in more depth or more concise (depending on what the guide is known for), if your main concern is that the guide has very little old or outdated information, then this would be a good guide for you.

Michelin

Famous for their quality reviews, the Red Michelin Guides are for hotels & Restaurants, the Green Michelin Guides are for main tourist destinations. However, the English language Green guide is the one most people use and it has now been supplemented with hotel and restaurant information. These are the serious review guides as the famous Michelin ratings are issued via these books.

Fodor's

Fodor's is the best selling guide among Americans. They have a bewildering array of different guides.
Read more ›
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42 of 48 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 17, 1997
Format: Paperback
Lonely Planet's "France: Travel Survival Kit" was essential to the success of our 21 day journey in France. My boyfriend and I did know where we were headed or what we wanted to do. Using this well organized, percise guide we found ourselves hikeing cliffs in Brittany and wondering backroads in Cote D'Azur.
We were new to the country and traveling by train. The first 160 pages of the guide were packed with all the many essentials of travel -- trains, monetary system, telephone cards -- the little things that make a huge difference. Who wants to spend the first few hours in France trying to figure out how the phones works?
We wanted to see France, not a heap of tourist attraction wizzing by us. Everywhere we went, this guide showed us the not so traveled places. Even in busy Paris, with help from our trusty guide, we visited flea markets and neighborhoods where tourists don't often venture. These were the places that gave us the real flavor of France.
I loved my trip to France. I can honestly say, due to this guide I was able to relax and enjoy the visit more. We relied upon it for finding accomidations and entertainment. It never failed us. We love you, Lonely Planet
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Luz Seine on August 12, 2005
Format: Paperback
If you're traveling to different regions and cities within France via train, bus, or plane, I'd definitely recommend this book. It offers very useful getting-to and getting-away options. For instance, if you want to travel between Normandy and Etretat, it requires a rather complex series of transfers using buses and possibly some trains - there is no direct train route (as I assumed before reading up on it in this book). This book alerts you to issues and offers alternative solutions. (Benefit: avoid unexpected, time-consuming problems and enjoy your trip more).

Lonely Planet Guides are not pretty, but they are useful when traveling around a country. I usually leave them back in the hotel room for consultation as needed. I've also carried photo copies of portions of them when I've been certain that's all I'd need. I would not be as likely to carry one if I was sure I was only going to stay in one city. They make it easy to take a sidetrip on the spur of the moment --especially when you're on a budget and traveling sans computer and Internet connection. (They also list cybercafes.) And, finally, I've found a few intriguing tidbits and advice not offered elsewhere.

If only staying in Paris, and it's your first visit, I recommend also carrying the AAA Spiral Paris Guide and the National Geographic Paris DestinationMap as they are pocket-sized. If you have more to spend, I'd also research using other books ahead of time and make hotel reservations based on other books, e.g., Michelin Green Guides, Fodor's Guides, etc. If you're on a budget and back-packing, make reservations using this guide. (Important to make reservations in Paris.)
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72 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Moshe Reuveni on March 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
I like the Lonely Planet guides, and I owe much of the pleasures I've experienced while traveling to them. But this one is lacking.
OK, it is young in spirit, and it does read like a book about France (i.e. high on atmosphere). And unlike most of the other guides of this series, it does cater for those who are not on a shoestring, as well as its regular low budgeted audiences.
However, when it comes to descriptions, it is simply beaten by the opposition, mainly the Eyesight guides. When it comes to France, the Lonely Planet's cheap format of black & white paper, without too many pictures, maps and photos, cannot stand up and face more modern competition.
As France is expensive anyway, you're better of with one of the alternatives even if you are on a shoestring; use other resources, like the web, for the kind of help you usually rely on Lonely Planet to supply you.
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