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Lonely Planet Iceland, Greenland & the Faroe Islands Paperback – May 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Series: Lonely Planet Iceland
  • Paperback: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet Publications; 4th edition (May 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0864426860
  • ISBN-13: 978-0864426864
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 5.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,110,260 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Beeblebrox on December 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
I used this book heavily during two trips around Iceland in 2000 and 2002, albeit the third edition.
The authors know where the "odd" things are to be found. Thanks to them, I located strange stuff which isn't on the average tourist's agenda: geothermal areas, bubbling sulfurous mud pots, Asian restaurants (in Iceland!), cemeteries. I experienced some lovely, desolate terrain where no one was to be found for miles and miles.
But, then again, that's why this is the "Lonely Planet" guide!
This guide, like other ones published by Lonely Planet, is clearly oriented toward the type of tourist who backpacks and/or hitch-hikes. Nonetheless, it still has much use for the independent tourist who prefers hotels to huts and cars to cabins. Just pick a place and start exploring. Their detailed maps and descriptions won't lead you astray.
A special bonus provided with of Lonely Planet books is the company's "eKno" service, which allows one to call nearly anywhere in the world from anywhere in the world, with tolls automatically debuted from a prepaid account. eKno also allows one to listen to one's email messages. Toll-free access numbers are available in most countries. eKno cards come with Lonely Planet books, ready to be activated. I've found this service extremely valuable when calling from Europe to the US.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By ransome22 on November 27, 2001
Format: Paperback
Despite the availability of internet resources, I think a printed guidebook is particularly helpful for unusual destinations such as these because it puts the hard-to-find information in one place under your fingertips. I used the previous edition of this book to take a week long trip to Greenland in January 2001. Even though a winter excursion to the Arctic is not a common vacation plan, this book told me how much sunlight to expect at what latitudes, estimated prices for air travel between towns, what sort of unpredictability to expect in the Arctic, whether or not it was feasible to do coastal travel by boat in the winter, the best times to see the aurora borealis, and the extent to which dog sleds are used as a 'normal' form of transportation, just to name a few. Of course it also provided detailed descriptions of towns which helped me choose my final destination. While providing the standard Lonely Planet maps, listings of places to stay, currency exchange options, restaurants, and whatnot, this particular guide also provides a healthy dose of reality. It makes clear that some places are quite difficult to visit unless you are well financed, and yet it also provides starting points for the extremely determined. Contrary to previous criticism, the previous edition (published in 1997) does in fact acknowledge the existence of the internet, providing email addresses and websites for further information. I can only imagine that this updated version is more complete. To quickly address the negative feedback that the guide is "outdated", please note the publication date of May 2001. That is quite current for any guide book.Read more ›
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Richard A. Lovett on January 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
Since 1999, I have been to Iceland twice and Greenland twice, for a total of seven weeks--extremely unusual for an American. Those trips included extended excursions by bicyle, backpack, and cross-country ski, with some bus excursions as well. Throughout, this book was my primary guide. I found it reliable and an extremely good source of inspiration, particularly for hikes.
I cite my own experience because I clearly fall into the target readership for this book. Car travelers aren't the intended audience, and may be disappointed. This book presumes (as do I, even at age 49) that the best way to see Iceland is afoot, a-pedal, or on one of that nation's wonderful backcountry bus routes. If you're not prepared to carry a backpack onto or off of the buses, you'll probably prefer another guidebook.
My main quibble is with the maps, which were hard to locate when I wanted them, and not very detailed. But you can get great maps in Reykjavik, so that's only a minor problem.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Peter S. Haslam on March 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
Having travelled to Iceland twice and purchased/read three different Iceland travel books, I wholeheartedly recommend LP's book over the others.
Although some folks prefer not to plan their trips ahead of time, the high cost of travel in Iceland combined with early sellouts of daytrips outside of Reykjavik necessitate some planning before arrival. This book contains more of the relevant details than the others.
While other books have more pictures, LP Iceland is the only one I've seen that contains enough specific facts on where to inquire about activities/meals/daytrips/etc to keep from wasting 1-2 expensive days after arrival figuring out what to do.
The additional sections on daytrips to Greenland and the Faroes are also particularly useful as planning tools.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
While this travel gudie does cover Iceland in detail, one needs to be careful to note that lonely planet does have their own agenda. Many of the hotels they reccommend over other establishments are not the best accomodations. Their may even be other hotels in the area where they say there are no other places to stay. And from a guide in the west fjords, some of their contact information as well as their descriptions may be far off.
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