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Lonely Planet Not For Parents Travel Book Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Series: Not For Parents
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet (October 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1742208142
  • ISBN-13: 978-1742208145
  • Product Dimensions: 3.6 x 4.8 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #336,726 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
28
4 star
14
3 star
4
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 46 customer reviews
It has every country in the world.
Amy Lynn
While marketed as a book for kids I have certainly enjoyed reading through it as well.
R. Lanthier
Really, you never know what you'll get until you turn the page!
Sunny Sewing Honeybee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Julia Flyte TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 7, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is a fantastic book. It covers a mighty 199 countries, grouped by region/continent: every country you can think of, from North Korea to San Marino, Saint Lucia to East Timor. Each country gets one full colour page which contains a small map, some key facts (size/population/language/currency) and then interesting facts about that country. As an example, for Benin in Africa we learn that it's the home of voodoo, about the history of human sacrifices in ancient times, about some of the amazing animals that live there, how taxis get loaded up with all sorts of items, about a village built on stilts to escape a water demon and about the beautiful tribal art. There are lots of photographs included and the layout is very enticing.

My sons are aged 11 and 7 and they both have really enjoyed looking through this book and learning about different countries. In fact, my 7 year old has become a little obsessed with it and keeps telling us facts about obscure countries. I think it's a terrific addition to our home library.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Irishman65 on May 5, 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The Travel Book has a colorful inviting cover that reminds you of the books your older elementary kids might read. There are 205 full color pages of locations. I admit to enjoying leafing through it to read the facts. Each page features a different country with images and facts arranged in an inviting and colorful scrapbook style. Most of the reading seems fine and directed at upper elementary and middle school kids but then you trip over a fact about human sacrifice on the Saint Kitts & Nevis page and it makes you think that parents might want to preview all the text before just handing it over to their kids. Also, the word "groovy" is used in the text and that isn't a word I'd expect today's generation to read. Finally, while it shares some serious facts for some locations it overlooks serious facts that are well-known about other countries. So, I'd recommend it for your younger teens, or as a family read but if was going in a classroom, I'd suggest middle school rather than upper elementary.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on December 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
It's getting harder to justify purchasing print books when e-books take up no physical space and are often lighter on the wallet. One of the least justifiable purchases these days are travel books because more up-to-date information is almost always available online.

The big exception to e-books revolves around purchases for kids. E-readers are still rather expensive (and breakable) to buy for smaller kids, and they aren't good substitutes for picture books. So probably what Lonely Planet is doing is focusing on where money on print books is still being spent: Children's books with lots of photos or illustrations.

That said, calling this a "travel book" is not exactly accurate, and that's possibly a problem, depending on what the kids (or parents) expect. There may be a bit of information for kids interested in famous sites, cities, and natural wonders, but there's also emphasis on deadly snakes, scorpions, smelly gases from volcanoes, mass slayings (like Jonestown) and the world's "stinkiest" fruit - stuff that certainly interests a lot of kids, but probably not the same kids who want to see the Eiffel Tower or the skyscrapers of Hong Kong. So the book is trying to be all things to all kids while only offering one page dedicated to each country. On the one hand, it's nice to show that all countries are equally important to learn about, but on the other hand, it's disingenuous to maintain that the best features of, say, Liechtenstein need the same space as the wonders of Egypt, Greece, or Brazil.

One impressive thing I noticed was the ability to distinguish countries that seem very much like, such as the different Caribbean nations.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Spinner VINE VOICE on December 30, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Hardly a travel guide, this is more of a DK Eyewitness book wanna-be. In fact, the content is more aptly described as "interesting facts and tid-bits."

While the title indicates it is "not for parents," I'm certainly glad I scanned through prior to giving it to my children. The "Hideous History" feature is often quite graphic, highlighting murder, genocide and cannibalism, often quite flippantly (as in the "Cannibal Kitchen" of Vanuatu.) Not all parents will feel comfortable allowing their children to read these facts without a bit of adult guidance!

What I found particularly odd is that they make mention of the evils of slavery, Idi Amin, the Khmer Rouge, the conflict between the Hutu and Tutsis, as well as the Angolan Civil war... but completely skip Hitler and the Holocaust! Did I miss it? I went over the countries involved and found no mention whatsoever. Also missing was mention of Saddam Hussein, as well as the current Chinese practice of imprisoning dissidents. There's an obvious lack of consistency.

There were other editorial curiosities, such as describing the recent revolution in Egypt as "peaceful" and including Palestine as one of the 200 countries. I realize that many *do* consider Palestine to be an independent country but I didn't think it was generally accepted as such. It affects me little either way, I just found it interesting that this book lists it as one of its countries, while World Atlas, as well as many organizations of repute list it as the Palestinian Territories and under the "Israel" heading.

Overall, we aren't impressed with this book. The Illustrated World Atlas by Dr. Alisdair Rogers is far superior and offers much more in the way of content. Granted, it doesn't go into specific detail for each of the countries, but does cover a remarkable amount of material.

Would I buy this book? No. Check it out from the library first.
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