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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good travel guide
The 2013 edition of Lonely Planet's guide to Paris lives up its hype as the most popular travel book for Paris. The guide contains practical advice, historical facts, travelers' stories, and inspiring photographs. It is the sort of guide for first timers or seasoned travellers to Paris.

The bottom line in buying any travel guide, is how useful is it? It depends...
Published 22 months ago by Gottfried Schmer

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kindle implementation disappointing
I bought this guide for the Kindle because I thought it would be great to have access to the information on my kindle and phone rather than having to lug the paper book around. But the navigation in the book was terrible, very hard to move back and forth between locations or to search for information about locations. And the maps were poorly reproduced so almost...
Published 14 months ago by Joshua Rosenbloom


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good travel guide, February 3, 2013
By 
Gottfried Schmer (Pusan, Korea (South)) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide) (Paperback)
The 2013 edition of Lonely Planet's guide to Paris lives up its hype as the most popular travel book for Paris. The guide contains practical advice, historical facts, travelers' stories, and inspiring photographs. It is the sort of guide for first timers or seasoned travellers to Paris.

The bottom line in buying any travel guide, is how useful is it? It depends on your interests and budget. If you want general knowledge of cultural and outdoor activities, LP is the best choice. On the other hand, if you aren't interested in straying off the beaten path, another travel guide such as Fodor's may be a more viable option.

There is plenty to do in Paris if you spend your whole summer vacation relaxing and seeing the sights. The guide is easy to use by looking up the best place to eat go shopping, buy an antique, and so on. However, with the popularity of LP, every place listed will raise their prices up to 25 %. A better alternative is to find places which are out of the way. Look for classified ads in the local newspaper (if you know some French) and go there instead of places which LP recommends. It can save you a lot of money and you may meet some interesting people.

The guidebook is slim enough (425 pp.) and it is compact enough to take on your trip. But with each new edition, valuable information such as emergencies and dangers are omitted. Some places in Paris during night are dangerous and tourists should be on their guard for purse snatching and pickpockets. Especially the Moulin Rouge area is notorious place for petty theft during night hours. The current edition does not have information for medical emergencies. This valuable piece of information can save a life and should be included in the next edition. Thus, I give 4 star rating out of 5.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Easy-To-Use Guide, April 18, 2013
This review is from: Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide) (Paperback)
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I've enjoyed Lonely Planet books for years, and Lonely Planet Paris (City Guide) is another great guidebook in the series. It is full of historical background as well as practical tips. I have never been to the city, but I am planning a trip now, and I have been going through this book to prepare. The Arc de Triomphe, for example, starts out with a brief history of the monument, explains some of the plaques, describes some of the sculptures, and concludes with the viewing platform.

WIKIPEDIA VS LONELY PLANET
It's all clear and well-written, but in this age of Wikipedia, how necessary is it? If you visit the Wikipedia page for the Arc de Triomphe, you'll find much more historical detail, many photographs of the plaques and so forth that are only briefly described in the guidebook, and better directions about how to gain access to the arch.

I've gathered a lot of Wikipedia entries for the trip and put them into my Evernote account, so I'll have them easily accessible. I also plan to have wireless access, so I doubt I will be consulting this guidebook as much as I would have ten or twenty years ago. Wikipedia is sometimes inaccurate when it comes to history (so is Lonely Planet), but it is usually on target when it comes to more practical matters like gaining access to a site like the Arc de Triomphe, and it has photographs galore.

If you have wireless access, should you bother bringing it along on your trip? I still think so, because it offers a handy way to find quick synopses of sites, and it still contains great tips on food (though Yelp!, like Wikipedia, is also a potentially more useful alternative). Gathering the Wikipedia entries takes a lot of time, and it is definitely easier to thumb through this guide, so it still has a role to play in planning for a trip.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kindle implementation disappointing, October 2, 2013
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I bought this guide for the Kindle because I thought it would be great to have access to the information on my kindle and phone rather than having to lug the paper book around. But the navigation in the book was terrible, very hard to move back and forth between locations or to search for information about locations. And the maps were poorly reproduced so almost unusable on a mobile device. The e-book medium should be perfect for guidebooks, but the publishers need to move beyond simply porting the print edition.

Content of the guide itself was OK.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply the Best!, January 26, 2013
By 
Joe the Lion (Minneapolis, MN, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide) (Paperback)
I've been very loyal to Lonely Planet travel guides for trips I've taken all over Europe and Asia. Their recommendations are always spot-on. The downside was always that they weren't as lavishly illustrated as some of the other guides on the market. With this new 2013 edition, Lonely Planet has gone COLOR. Pictures and maps liven up the guide. And I'm very happy they've brought back their extensive maps at the back of the book (missing from the 2011 edition!). If you're really looking for the best Paris guide, Lonely Planet is it. Great background information, great tips on how to get the most out of your time there, and some excellent walking tour maps to inspire a day in a new neighborhood. Furthermore, I do enjoy how Lonely Planet always includes some information specific to LGBT travelers. Now my partner and I know where to go for a drink when we're there! Do yourself a favor and take this with you!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great city guide for a great city, February 24, 2013
By 
Reba Berryman (Austin, TX, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide) (Paperback)
This is the best. It's organized by neighborhood. All the sightseeing, eating/drinking and shopping for each neighborhood is in a separate section. The neighborhood maps included with all the sites noted just makes it that much better. All I have to do is take a section and map out of this book for my day's activities!
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars An inferior guide to Paris, March 23, 2013
This review is from: Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide) (Paperback)
I bought this book today and regretted it within an hour. The book contains few words and leaves out important information. For example the section on Versailles (page 267) does not mention how to get there from Paris! A shoddy work from Lonely Planet. I did not expect this from a brand like Lonely Planet.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Useful tips but the maps are impossible to read, February 13, 2014
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The guide is very complete and practical but the maps are impossible to read in the kindle version and I am not going to download them on the lonely planet web and print them out....that is the exact thing i was trying to avoid when I bought an ebook!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous; packed with info and photos, April 5, 2013
This review is from: Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide) (Paperback)
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We're planning a trip to Paris this summer and, though I've been to the city a couple of times, I'm always eager for more guidance as to what to do and see while I'm there. I've used Frommer's and Fodor's guides in the past, so I'm new to Lonely Planet. This book has impressed me so much that I'll be sure to buy more Lonely Planet guides in the future.

The beginning of the book has a lot of handy info, like the Top 16 sights in Paris, some suggested itineraries, listings of all the markets in the city, a month by month guide of festivals, and suggestions for things to do with kids. There are a lot of color photos sprinkled throughout the pages, which made it very handy for me to show my nine-year-old daughter, giving her some ideas about the things we can do and see while we're there.

The next section of the book divides Paris by neighborhood, and this part is pretty standard fare for guidebooks. Each neighborhood section lists sites to see, places to stay, shopping, and restaurants. There are brief descriptions of each of the listings along with some handy info such as prices, addressed, websites, etc. At the end of the neighborhood section, there's a brief section with suggested side trips from Paris the has a nice subsection on Versailles, including a diagram of the castle and what's located where within it. This should come in handy for us, as we're planning on making a trip to Versailles.

The end sections of the book get into topics like the architecture and culture of Paris, and there's an end section on transportation.

All in all, this is pretty standard fare, but it's nicely presented. Though I mostly want my guidebooks to be informative, I do like that this one includes so many color photos because it does help me get a better feel for what I might like to see and do while I'm in Paris. In fact, I like this book so much that it inspired me to buy the Lonely Planet Brittany & Normandy guide. I'll definitely check out Lonely Planet books when planning future trips.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Accessible and Useful, April 16, 2013
This review is from: Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide) (Paperback)
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On the one hand, I tend to believe that guidebooks are all fairly similar. On the other hand, once you get used to a certain label, it's hard to make changes.

I like Rick Steves' advice, but the layout of his guidebooks bother me. The information is great, but the tall, thin format and the easy-to-tear paper, in addition to the lengthy explanations and descriptions can be a drag if you're on the go. (Ironically, I like to read those before I go, rather than having them with me on the ground.)

This Lonely Plant Paris book is a more standard paperback size with heavier paper and lots of bright photos. Those are kind of a waste (who's going to be confused by whether or not they're looking at the Eiffel Tower?), but they look pretty.

There's an introductory section with top sights, explanations of general cultural information in short, direct paragraphs, and pages in each section listing recommendations, so you can plan stops on the fly. The layout of the more detailed listings is by neighborhood, in standard guidebook format. Finally, there are a handful of less vital but often interesting chapters: day trips from the city, historical and cultural information, more cultural information (train stations! bike rental! public toilets!) and a short language primer.

This is a good book for a brief visit with stops at the standard places (though they do have some fun recommendations that are not in every guidebook's top 10), with bonus points for the good and detailed cultural info. After slogging through Rick Steves' travelogues, this book just felt accessible and manageable, with just enough information to plan a pleasant journey.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive and Informative, September 12, 2013
This review is from: Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide) (Paperback)
This Lonely Planet Guide to Paris follows the recent format for this series of books. The first seventy pages of this 430 page book are dedicated to more general topics such as general advice, what to do with kids, what's free, galleries and museums, month by month and, of course, the obligatory Top 16. The latter is less subjective than for a large country guide and includes such places as the obvious Arc de Triomphe, Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame.

The meat of the guide is in the next 230 pages or so which is divided into ten areas of the city. In each of these the major sites are described and there are suggestions as to where to eat and drink. Personally I find the where to go sections of this sort of guide to be the most useful. Too often the information on restaurants is out of date, whilst I personally use resources such as Tripadvisor to sort out suitable accommodation these days. However, to be fair the description of places to visit is well put together and there is a useful top sites by area guide for each of the neighbourhoods. The sort of information essential for the tourist is all there, such as when does it open, what is the cost etc. The book finishes off with more general information and a useful survival guide together with quite a comprehensive mapping section.

Paris is a large and diverse city. If you are planning a visit of more than a day or two it is probably worth your while to purchase a city guide rather than relying on the country guide. The detailed information here is about twice what you would find in the Lonely Planet France Guide and is comprehensive and informative.
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Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide)
Lonely Planet Paris (Travel Guide) by Nicola Williams (Paperback - January 1, 2013)
$20.99 $14.88
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