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The Long Loud Silence Hardcover – November 1, 1993


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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Lightyear Pr (November 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0899683754
  • ISBN-13: 978-0899683751
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,268,213 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By jimnypivo VINE VOICE on December 4, 2003
Format: Hardcover
For well over thirty years, my mother told me of a post-apocalyptic book where the Mississippi River became an uncrossable barrier between the contaminated Eastern US, and the pristine West. She finally procured an old, disintegrating paperback copy for me to read. Originally written in 1952, my edition was based on a re-write Tucker did in 1969, incorporating references of the Viet Nam war.
Most of the great post-apocalyptic novels have had films made of them so that new generations of readers could be redirected to the books and generate interest in the book and the author's other works. Examples that come to mind are Stephen King's `The Stand', the Philip Dick short story `Second Variety' (`Screamers'), H.G. Wells' The Shape of Things to Come' (`The Shape of Things') and `The Time Machine', and Neville Chute's `On The Beach.'
Sadly, though, Wilson Tucker's account of an Army recruiter surviving an atomic/biological attack on the USA doesn't have that 21st Century video version pulling in the book fans. The book has gone out of print.
Cpl. Gary wakes from a birthday bender on the wrong side of the Mississippi River after the nuclear/biological attack. He thinks that because he is a member of the US Army, that his comrades on the Western side of the River will welcome him home with open arms. Before he gets a chance, he sees these same soldiers will shoot anyone from the East who dare to try to cross over.
The rest of the story is about how Gary tries to adjust to the changes that the apocalypse has brought ----hunger, loneliness, mistrust and survival. Gary evolves from a not-too-likeable fellow into a clever, practical, but solitary survivor.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Maximiliano F Yofre on July 21, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Wilson A. Tucker is a not very prolific sci-fi author. He has written a dozen novels and two dozen short stories. Nevertheless he managed to produce, at least, three great books in the field: "The Long Loud Silence" (1952), "Time Masters" (1953) and "Year of the Quiet Sun" (1970).
This book was published when the Cold War was raging, as many of the lasts I've reviewed and show some of the cultural background of the time.

Here the reader is presented with a world situated after a crushing blitz war. Corporal Gary has celebrated his birthday with a monumental drunkenness. How many days has he been unconscious? He couldn't say. But he awakes in USA's eastern half, devastated by biological and nuclear weapons. The Mississippi river is the unsurpassable border dividing America in two. At the west margin some organized Government still survives and a country free from pestilence. The very few survivors in the east are isolated and not permitted to come across.
Gary is not a very nice character; he is prone to being selfish and ruthless. But he is a survivor whatsoever and his WWII experience enhances him to do this. He tries once and again to go west.
Will he succeed? Read the book and find the answer.
Reviewed by Max Yofre.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Greg Hughes on June 9, 2001
Format: Hardcover
One morning Corporal Russell Gary wakes up in a dingy hotel to an eerie silence. The United States, or, more accurately, the land east of the Mississippi River, has been attacked by atomic bombs and biological weapons. This devastated portion of the United States is now under quarantine. No one gets out, no one gets in.
Gary is now faced with a battle for survival. Trapped in a world returning to barbarism, he's determined to find a way of crossing the river and returning to the civilization that still exists on the other side. But the biological weapons have left Gary and the other survivors infected with plague germs. Anyone who tries to cross the river is killed by the soldiers guarding the bridges, for fear of spreading contamination. Gary is trapped between armed soldiers on one side and lawless violence on the other. Over the months, things go from bad to worse...
"The Long Loud Silence" was written in 1952, the same year the United States detonated the first hydrogen bomb. The novel is grim but not as bleak as some of the other books in the genre. In fact it's quite optimistic in some ways. The novel is set in the 1950s. Corporal Gary is a World War Two veteren. That experience gives him an advantage over the other survivors he is trapped with; he knows the tricks of survival. One expression Gary is fond of using is "hell of a note". Was the author afraid of using profanity? It's an expression I've never heard before. It sure gets used a lot, though.
The cover artwork shows a muscle-bound, macho-looking guy in a ripped shirt holding a gun. Behind him is a stylized mushroom cloud. The only thing I have in common with this character is that he has the same birthday as me.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By JEFFREY F WILKINSON on July 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
If you're looking for a thrilling roller coaster ride this is the book for you. I love Sci-Fi novels that stand the test of time and this one delivers. Sure, its out dated but I think the reads can read it with a 1950's mentality. If you're an academic who likes to stare at your shoes laces in deep thought, you probably won't like it. Enough already said about the plot. Just get it and enjoy!
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