Robin non-member
Qty:1
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by silverplatters
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All of our used items are 100% Guaranteed to play.
Add to Cart
or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in your item
Get up to a $1.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Long Time Comin
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Long Time Comin


Price: $6.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
26 new from $2.49 16 used from $2.28
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, February 1, 2008
"Please retry"
$6.99
$2.49 $2.28
Vinyl
"Please retry"
$69.78 $2.88

Amazon Artist Stores

All the music, full streaming songs, photos, videos, biographies, discussions, and more.
.

Frequently Bought Together

Long Time Comin + Super Session + Fillmore East: The Lost Concert Tapes 12-13-68
Price for all three: $22.03

Buy the selected items together


Product Details

  • Audio CD (February 1, 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Sbme Special Mkts.
  • ASIN: B0012GMVIU
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (71 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #17,064 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Killing Floor
2. Groovin' Is Easy
3. Over-Lovin' You
4. She Should Have Just
5. Wine
6. Texas
7. Sittin' in Circles
8. You Don't Realize
9. Another Country
10. Easy Rider
11. Sunny [*]
12. Mystery [*]
13. Look into My Eyes [#][*]
14. Going Down Slow [#][*]

Editorial Reviews

'60's debut from ex-Butterfield Band guitarist Mike Bloomfield and drummer Buddy Miles. Includes bonus tracks and previously unreleased cuts including Sunny; Look Into My Eyes; Killing Floor; Groovin' Is Easy; Wine and more!

Customer Reviews

CBS did a good Digital remix.
DJ Jones
The band in question, ELECTRIC FLAG, brought together BLUES and POP music, with a Chicago HORN section, with a good dose of LSD.
W. T. Hoffman
I don't know what I got but it sounds great!
Lawrence Brill

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 50 people found the following review helpful By R. Lindeboom on August 17, 2004
Format: Audio CD
When this album first appeared in early 1968, underground freeform FM radio was in its heyday and the songs on "A Long Time Comin'" were a mainstay on underground radio. AM radio didn't know what to make of a band that combined blues, folk, jazz, rock and -- at times -- even classical modes in a sound that was astounding. This was the Bay Area's answer to New York's Blood, Sweat & Tears and it was an incredibly worthy answer indeed. Al Kooper built the original BS&T from the ashes of the little-known Blues Project, while The Electric Flag's Mike Bloomfield came from even headier stuff -- namely, Paul Butterfield Blues Band, where Bloomfield proved that a Jewish kid can have the blues -- real blues. To cover what other musicians in this band made this such an incredible group would take pages as there are so many of them. Buddy Miles handled the drums (who'd later launch his own Buddy Miles Express before joining Hendrix in the Band of Gypsies). Barry Goldberg added keys that were exquisite before leaving to form Barry Goldberg's Reunion. The horns in the Flag were more brash and bluesy than the classically-trained jazz musings of their New York contemporaries, BS&T. These guys could cook and when they turned up the heat, no audience I ever saw them perform to was able to withstand the spell they created live. The songs on this album are a remarkable testament to the precision, eloquence and power of the Electric Flag. Wow. Even the memory of these guys live is powerful. This album is their greatest recorded legacy.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
62 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Marc Siegel on September 13, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This being one of my favorite cd's I was excited when I saw this available as a remastered import from Sony.However, when I put it on it sounded terrible. The highs were so screechy that the cd was unlistenable and lets not talk about the non-existent bass. I do have the original Columbia issue and compared to this "remastered version" the original sounds like an audiophile cd. Not really but this is how bad this thing sounds. In looking at the credits it appears that the same person did the remastering on both. I am guessing that the import is nothing more than a digital dub from way back when. Do yourself a favor and just get the Columbia/Legacy remastered compilation. It has 99 9/10 of the origial album and it sounds great. Happy listening
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Somebody on March 31, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I ordered the import version of this CD (Sony Holland, English language label) because it was listed as "remastered" and I assumed it would have better fidelity than the domestic release. I have never heard the domestic version but it cannot be any worse than the import. Very tinny highs, not much bass. The original vinyl probably sounds better.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By BluesDuke on June 26, 2001
Format: Audio CD
What Mike Bloomfield wanted, when he bolted the Paul Butterfield Blues Band to make his home in San Francisco and put together this spry brass outfit, was a band that shied away from no portion of American music while keeping an anchor in the blues. What he got on this album was both a pretty powerful actuality and its own death sentence - the material is mostly top flight stuff but the cohesion doesn't always hold up as it should, given the talent Bloomfield assembled for the venture. And, considering that the band would purge Bloomfield, singer Nick Gravenites, and keyboardsman Barry Goldberg not long after this (their first) went onto the racks, that's a troublesome thought given the Flag's potential.
Still, this is the only Electric Flag you'll ever need; nay, require. You can't argue with the breezy power of "Killin' Floor," where Bloomfield and company wrap some vibrant brass lines around the Howlin' Wolf classic and give just about everyone room to breathe, even if it's Bloomfield's slinkily dangling guitar and Buddy Miles's rumble funk drumming that are the stars of the show. They rewrap Stick McGhee's vintage "Drinkin' Wine, Spo-De-O-Dee" into the lickety split boogie "Wine," grind it through practically laughing horns, Bloomfield's hit-the-roof-running guitar solo, and Gravenites's exhortative vocals, then finish off with a slowed-down coda that damn near serves up a round on the house. But they show some soul without being pretentious about it - Bloomfield's surprising "You Don't Realise" (he was usually, at best, a stumbling songwriter), Rick Polte's "She Should Have Just," and Gravenites's classic "Groovin' Is Easy" make a case for the Flag having been as credible a soul band as a blues-rock brass attack.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 21, 1999
Format: Audio CD
The band's name had a subtitle, "An American Music Band". This CD is far more than just 'blues with horns'. It beautifully integrates musical elements from an incredibly diverse range of sources, including Chicago, Memphis, Texas, Motown, Philly, MuscleShoals, NewOrleans, Nashville. It is more deeply and respectfully rooted in those musical traditions than probably any of the other hybrid pop music of its era. The music has somewhat less harmonic sophistication and self-conscious compositional structure than the music of its nearest competition from that era, Blood, Sweat & Tears, but it delivers more immediacy, drive, solo instrumentalism, idiom and soul. It thumps; it rocks; it screams; it moans; it wails; it cruises; it caresses.
Bloomfield, Gravenites, Miles, et al., knew in their heads and in their bones exactly what they were doing.
Personally, I'd recommend this CD over the other Electric Flag CDs, including the various anthologies and collections. This was their first, their best, and the only one that was conceived and realized (by the band itself) as a single integrated work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

Forums

Topic From this Discussion
Mike bloomfield
Back around '66, I read a rave review of The Paul Butterfield Blues Band LP, and it's lead guitarist, "the unbelievable Mike Bloomfield". It took me a while to track it down, (the record stores had never heard of it), but when I did, I was totally blown away! I didn't know guitar... Read More
Feb 6, 2011 by rickstones |  See all 3 posts
Have something you'd like to share about this product?
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category