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The Long Winter Hardcover – October 14, 1953


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The Long Winter + By the Shores of Silver Lake (Little House) + Little Town on the Prairie (Little House)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Series: Little House
  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Revised edition (October 14, 1953)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060264608
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060264604
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.7 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (111 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #162,711 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Perhaps the most impressive of these vivid and memorable narratives." Times Literary Supplement --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

The Ingalls family moves into the town of DeSmet to weather the dangerous winter ahead. As the snow mounts, Laura and her family must ration their food and coal as they wait in vain for a train to arrive with supplies. Almanzo Wilder and his brother realize that if something isn’t done soon, everyone will starve. They begin an impossible journey across the frozen prairie in search of provisions, before it’s too late.

Based on the real adventures of Laura Ingalls Wilder, THE LONG WINTER is the seventh book in the award-winning Little House series. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Laura Ingalls Wilder was born in 1867 in the log cabin described in Little House in the Big Woods. As her classic Little House books tell us, she and her family traveled by covered wagon across the Midwest. She and her husband, Almanzo Wilder, made their own covered-wagon trip with their daughter, Rose, to Mansfield, Missouri. There Laura wrote her story in the Little House books, and lived until she was ninety years old. For millions of readers, however, she lives forever as the little pioneer girl in the beloved Little House books.

Customer Reviews

If someone was only going to read only one book in the series, this is the one I would recommend.
HeatherHH
I have embarked on the reading of the "Little House" book series, an historical account of the life of pioneer girl Laura Ingalls and her family.
cheeto1
The blizzards howl and screech, threads sing together like music, voices of strangers in the street, the coffee mill grinds on endlessly.
Julie Norman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Susan J. Bybee on October 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
THE LONG WINTER is the best book for a couple of different reasons. First, it's a dramatic tale of a whole town nearly starving to death during the hard winter. Secondly, this seems to be the only book in which not everything is seen from Laura's viewpoint. This was a wise decision on the part of the author, because since Pa was the only one who went out of the house during the bitter weather, he would've had to come back and relate everything to his family.
In addition, the harrowing trek by Almanzo and Cap to find wheat was best told by the author switching to their viewpoint. Also, some of the tension amongst the townspeople when supplies are low and prices are high really gives the novel added flavor and drama.
A third reason that THE LONG WINTER is the best of the series is that it's so educational. Even the most casual of readers can pick up survival tips by observing what Pa, Ma and the girls do to 'contrive', strive and ultimately, survive. It is true that some of the chapters have a sameness, but this makes the reader feel what it was like to face starvation in the freezing dark cold. When Laura feels 'never fully awake', she's experiencing classic symptoms of starvation.
If you choose just one "Little House" book (but why would anyone stop at one?) read THE LONG WINTER.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By cheeto1 on February 18, 2004
Format: Paperback
I have embarked on the reading of the "Little House" book series, an historical account of the life of pioneer girl Laura Ingalls and her family. This is the 5th book in the series and it is by far the most exciting. Pa, Ma, Mary(who is now blind), Laura, Carrie and Grace get a new homestead but they must move into the town of DeSmet for the winter and they plan to build a house on their new land in the spring. Once settled in, Pa meets a mysterious old indian at the store who warns of a blizzard that will last seven months. And he is right. It comes in October and there is still blizzard in April. It is so cold where they live that there is ice in their bucket of water every morning so they must daily heat it on the stove in order to get water. To keep warm at night they put what is called a hot flatiron in their beds. I think they are pieces of the stove that go on burners. Like all the other books in this series, you learn interesting things: How do you get your horse out of a hole in the snow? How do you make a lamp out of a button and some grease? How do you ward off and treat frostbite? What do you do when all you have to eat for months is potatoes and just when you can't stand to eat one more potato you run out? Yes, they actually ran out of food! It happened twice in this book. You will learn what happens when a family runs out of food. You will learn what it is like to begin starving. You will see what 2 men did in their effort to save a whole town from starving. You will see how some people act when pushed to their very limits. The good and the bad come out in people. When Laura wakes up every morning, there is frost on the nails that hold their roof and walls together. The blizzard has howling, screaming winds with only one day break between 4 day long blizzards.Read more ›
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By D. Blankenship HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
For some reason, this work, of all the author's, remains one of my favorite. I was first exposed to these books, this one included, will over fifty years ago when it was read to me by a teacher. I have reread the book sever times over the years, including recently and it still appeals to the little boy lurking inside me somewhere. I do feel that this book, along with the other books in this series, is children literature at its best. The stories are somehow timeless, yet in their telling, not only do we get some great writing from a great story teller, but we are given a snap shot of our actual history, seen through the eyes of a child. Laura is older is this work of course, but due the circumstances of the books, this makes it all the more noteworthy. Cannot recommend this one highly enough.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
We have just finished reading this fifth book in the Laura series with our five year old daughter - she has loved all of them. I can recall reading this as a child, and the impression of the hunger, hardship, and courage of the Ingalls family stayed with me. I thought it might be a little dark for my daughter, but she really enjoyed it. We heartily recommend the entire series, even for children who are not able to read it independently yet - she started the series two months ago when she turned five, and we have read it virtually every night since (Little House in the Big Woods, on the Prairie, Banks of Plum Creek, etc.). It really is an interesting way to introduce American history, settling of the West, etc., into a child's life, especially a girl's. My younger daugther, 3, enjoys it too, but has a shorter attention span. The two of them play "Laura & Mary" all the time, and have demonstrated via their imaginary play that not just the spirit but the detail of the stories have made an impression. I don't think we have "ruined" it for them by reading it to them before they could read it on their own - I think they will return to these stories later.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By V. VanCamp on August 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
but despite this, they remained ever hopeful! This book gets a bit sad due to the hard winter they had to get through. A few times the Ingalls family nearly ran out of food and things to burn to keep warm, but through ingenuity and faith they were able to keep fed and warm!
In this book, the whole town is suffering because the train with the towns supplies was unable to get through due to blizzard upon blizzard upon blizzard that kept the railway covered!
To make matters even harder for the Ingalls family they had no way to burn their lamp and Pa's fingers were so stiff that he could not play the fiddle! The hours seemed to drag sometimes for the family, but I was intrigued to see how they would come up with new and creative ways of passing the time.
This book is certainly a must read due to the wonderful example the Ingalls provide for dealing with hard times. They never let go of their faith and hope!
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