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Looking Good in Print Paperback – April 1, 1998

ISBN-13: 078-8581085677 ISBN-10: 1566048567 Edition: 4th

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Product Details

  • Series: Looking Good in Print
  • Paperback: 285 pages
  • Publisher: Coriolis Group Books; 4th edition (April 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1566048567
  • ISBN-13: 978-1566048569
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 8 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,730,558 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

This book is an excellent choice for anyone aspiring to become a successful desktop-publishing professional. In fact, it's the guide, long respected in the desktop-publishing community, and this fourth edition has more examples of good and bad designs than ever.

Parker and Berry first discuss essential design concepts such as relevance, proportion, consistency, contrast, restraint, and attention to detail. Next the authors teach you about basic tools for organizing layouts: grids, columns, gutters, headlines, kickers, captions, bullet lists, and pull quotes, to name a few. They delve into the intricacies of typography and font families, highlighting such concepts as type size, alignment, and leading and kerning. Next you learn about the use of white space and about rulers and accents such as borders, boxes, drop shadows, and bleeds. The authors discuss illustrations, clip art, backgrounds, charts, diagrams, tables, and maps and advise you on positioning those elements on a page. There's also a lot of information on selecting, resizing, and placing photographs. A full-color chapter illustrates how to choose color and use spot color, full color, and duotones.

At this point the authors move from theory to hands-on projects--you apply the design concepts that they have already put forth. You learn about the appropriate design, graphic, and text elements for newsletters, ads, catalogs, and other business correspondence. Each chapter in this section offers plenty of illustrations and ends with a checklist of reminders that you can refer to as you design.

Especially useful are chapter 12, which features common design mistakes along with illustrations and explanations of what's wrong, and chapter 13, which highlights redesigns of poorly produced publications. The latter is a before-and-after glimpse of designs of almost all types of publications, from newsletter to survey. These two chapters drive home succinctly and with great visual impact every point of design that the authors have previously discussed. Finally, the appendix offers extra tips on printing in color, and choosing image databases, paper, and service bureaus.

The authors don't refer to the Windows or Macintosh operating systems or to any software programs. The understanding is that you will learn how to use your software tools elsewhere and consult the book for elements of design. That's a reasonable goal, as the authors maintain a clear, concise tone and offer many tips that are tangential but still relevant to the subject matter. For example, the chapter on type has a short sidebar on the difference between kerning and tracking and a longer sidebar on font substitution. All in all, this book functions well as both a how-to manual for beginning designers and as a design reference for more advanced designers. --Kathleen Caster

Review

Now celebrating its 10th anniversary with nearly a quarter million copies sold, Looking Good in Print has become a classic and virtually launched an entire genre. Recognized as the definitive work in its category, this book features new information on service bureaus, color and printing, color lasers, new technologies, and much more.

The New York Times says, "If you can afford only one book on desktop publishing, this is the one." MacWEEK says, "A graphic design primer for anyone who wants to design better-looking...desktop-published printed material." From PC Week, "Looking Good in Print is an excellent and valuable resource."

The fourth edition has been updated to reflect the now-mature desktop publishing world, covering all the commonly used print publishing formats.

The book coaches designers to design with the reader (and readability) in mind, taking advantage of the strengths of the print medium while finessing its weaknesses, and avoiding both common and obscure design pitfalls. -- Book Description


More About the Author

Roger C. Parker is a graphic designer, design educator, and $32 Million Dollar author.

The author of 38 books, since his earliest NY Times best-seller, Looking good in Print, Roger has been promoting visual literacy and enhanced productivity. His other books include The Streetwise Guide to Relationship Marketing on the Internet.

A certified Guerrilla Marketing coach, and a frequent presenter at graphic design and web productivity bootcamps, Roger's clients include Apple Computer, Hewlett-Packard, Microsoft, and Mindjet.

Roger's latest book is Design to Sell. At my Design to Sell website, www.designtosellonline.com, you can download two chapters my latest book, subscribe to my free Design to Sell newsletter, learn about and read my Design to Sell blog, http://www.rogercparker.com/Blog/


Customer Reviews

If you have anyother reasonably good DTP book, this will just be the same stuff.
George
Once you've covered first base with the "Non-Designers Design Book" you are well equipped to start reading this book.
Eric Methot
This is the most "readable" book on graphic design for desktop publishing that I own.
djdrapes@msn.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By akwriter on January 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
As a freelance writer who dabbles in desktop publishing, I've been searching for months for a concise, well-written, easy-to-grasp "how-to" book on DTP. I've consulted with graphic artists, posted messages online, and asked everyone I know for just such a book. I can't believe no one ever suggested "Looking Good in Print!" I stumbled across this book here on Amazon.com and decided to give it a whirl, and I couldn't be happier. This guide provides practical, step-by-step advice on conceptualizing your design, mastering the tools and techniques, and putting it all together to create great looking publications. With sections on illustrations and photos, printing techniques, and dealing with service bureaus, this book covers all the bases. Highly recommended!
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By djdrapes@msn.com on September 15, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is the most "readable" book on graphic design for desktop publishing that I own. This book assumes you are already familiar with your software. Examples are outstanding; often the same text & graphic elements are presented in a variety of ways. Content is concise and simple, and directed at the intermediate to advanced user. The first half of the book deals with elements of design; the second half incorporates that info with special pointers for newsletters, ads, brochures, catalogs, letterheads, reports, resumes, forms, business cards, etc. My favorite chapter was "Common Design Pitfalls", followed by a chapter of redesigns.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jack D. Herrington on January 25, 2006
Format: Paperback
I like this book because it not only covers the technical side of print and web work, but it also covers style and to some degree content. I like how the author encourages the reader to reel the design elements in. All to often the lure of the design pallette becomes too tempting and the design overshadows the content. This book will have your design complementing the content, which is how it should be.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Duff HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
If you do anything with print or web media (aka desktop publishing), you probably know how easy it is to make mistakes and produce amateurish results. Looking Good in Print (6th Edition) by Roger C. Parker gives you the background and practical advice you need to start, well... looking good in print.

Contents:

Part 1 - Elements Of Design: Getting Started; Tools of Organization; The Architecture of Type; Building Blocks of Graphic Design; The Art of Illustration; Working with Photographs

Part 2 - Putting Your Knowledge To Work: Publications; Advertisements; Sales Material; Business Communication; Response Devices - Forms, Surveys, and Coupons; Designing Large Documents and Publications; Common Pitfalls; Redesign; Designing Documents for Web Distribution

Appendix; Prepress Tips and Techniques

Index

Any book that makes it past the 2nd edition is one I usually figure has stood the test of time, and must have something to offer. This book definitely fulfills that. It starts off with the basics of fonts, lines, alignment, and all those things that you probably just take for granted. There's a real science behind it, and Parker does a good job of clearly explaining it. But rather than just dealing in generalities and theory, he applies the knowledge to real areas of writing. Part 2 is valuable both for the explanation of how things should be done, as well as visual examples of how things go wrong. Unless you can see "what's not right", it's often hard to know why something would be considered a good practice. There's an abundance of example layouts and samples to illustrate his points, and you'd be hard pressed to find this much quality information in a single source anywhere else.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Marlene A Archambeau on August 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
I consider myself a specialist in wordprocessing, presentations, and spreadsheets; but this book has given me a lot of wonderful pointers. In time, anyone can run out of ideas. I have gained 3 new ideas since purchasing this book; needless-to-say, my ideas were well received. Book has been worth every penny spent.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By D. Donovan, Editor/Sr. Reviewer on April 13, 2006
Format: Paperback
The sixth updated edition of Roger C. Parker's LOOKING GOOD IN PRINT tops fifteen years in print with another edition addressing the latest potentials of desktop design. From creating professional-quality letterhead and business cards to learning how to print Internet documents, advice for desktop publishers assume no special program or experience but survey different design pitfalls, how to work with large documents, and how to create designs which 'wow'. Design tips apply to either PC or MAC users alike and are packed with techniques and tips that avoid the common pitfalls.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dan McKinnon VINE VOICE on May 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
'Looking Good in Print' by Roger Parker is an absolute must have for anyone working with print media and how it travels from the production house to the reader/end-user. Now in its 6th Edition, this guide provides essential advice, tips, and tricks from someone in the know who has been working with said topic for over a decade and a half.

Discussion in this book revolves around layouts, design, working with images, text, and how to output content itself in the wisest and slickest way possible.

For anyone that works with the design of laying out information in Print form (live or online), this book is an absolute best buy!!

***** HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
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