Looking Like the Enemy (The Young Reader's Edition) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$10.30
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $4.70 (31%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 19 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps Paperback


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.30
$8.68 $1.41

Frequently Bought Together

Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps + Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (Dover Thrift Editions)
Price for both: $12.70

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

100 M&T
100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime
Looking for something good to read? Browse our picks for 100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime, brought to you by the Amazon Book Editors.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: NewSage Press; Likely 1st Edition edition (March 10, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0939165538
  • ISBN-13: 978-0939165537
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #23,017 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald was 80 years old when her first book was published in April 2005. With her memoir, "Looking Like the Enemy," Gruenewald has broken her silence as a Nisei (second generation Japanese American) who was imprisoned in Japanese-American internment camps during World War II. David Guterson, author of "Snow Falling on Cedars," describes Gruenewald's memoir as "a painfully honest narrative of imprisonment. a valuable contribution to the literature of Japanese-American internment."

This memoir is used in university, college, and advanced high school classes. In Fall 2010, a Young Reader's edition of "Looking Like the Enemy" will be available for readers in grades 5 through 8. Mary speaks to educational, library, and community groups regularly about her internment during World War II. She also traveled to Japan after the publication of her book and spoke to many different Japanese groups about this difficult chapter in American history.

Mary's vision is to share her story with as many people as possible in hopes that internment camps will never happen again in the United States. She also wants people to understand how harmful it can be to judge someone simply by the way they look. Mary's articles regarding her internment during WW II have appeared in newspapers and magazines, and she has presented commentaries for NPR KPLU. She also consulted with the National Park Service during its establishment of Minidoka Internment Camp as a National Park. Mary received an Asian American Living Pioneer Award in 2003 honoring her contributions.

After being released from her last Japanese-American internment camp, Mary became a registered nurse, and worked as an R.N. for more than a quarter of a century. She established the Consulting Nurse Service within the Group Health Cooperative in 1971, which has become a national model for numerous health care providers. In 2002, she was a medical delegate representing seniors on behalf of Medicare Plus Choice. At that meeting, Mary was selected along with ten other delegates to advise President George W. Bush on health care issues.

Presently, Mary is writing a book on being in her 80s and the wisdom she has gained from a long life, well lived! Mary meets weekly with a Seattle writing class where she continues to hone her skills as a writer. Brenda Peterson has been Mary's teacher for more than a decade. Peterson's latest book is a memoir, "I Want to Be Left Behind: Finding Rapture Here on Earth."

In the course of working on "Looking Like the Enemy," Peterson gave Mary an unusual and special assignment: Find a Japanese doll similar to the one you and your family burned along with your other Japanese treasures in 1942, fearful of an F.B.I. search. Mary found a special doll and perched it near her writing desk as she finished her memoir---a reminder of what she endured and lost during the war years.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
23
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 27 customer reviews
Book is written with such feeling and detail.
Criss
The book lays bare a shameful chapter in our country's history that we must never be allowed to forget.
Leslie D. Helm
Mary Matsuda Gruenewald's story is a touching disclosure of her life in the internment camps.
Robert Hutchings

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Patricia Lewis on June 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
Looking Like the Enemy is a not-to-be forgotten book. I savored every word and image as I tried to imagine how I would feel in Mary's Matsuda's shoes as a teenager imprisoned by her own government simply because of her parent's ancestry.

Mary's writing is so vivid and she makes the internment come alive as she shares her thoughts and feelings at being plunged into this terrible situation. While her anger and fear are so real, so also is the hope that her mother in particular, instills in the family.

I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to better understand our history and also racial discrimination. In our world today when many are punishing those who "look like the enemy", may this book serve as a lesson to us all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Leslie D. Helm on May 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
There are many books about the internment camp experience, but none have the emotional power and narrative drive of Mary Matsuda Gruenwald's book "Looking Like the Enemy." By sharing with us her personal story about her time in the camps, by laying bare her feelings of anger and shame in this heart-wrenching coming-of-age story, Mary Matsuda shows us what it is like to be torn from your community and friends for no good reason. Reading her book, I cannot help but think of the similar experiences now faced by Muslims in our country. The fact that we were wrong to imprison the Japanese-American populationis intellectually undeniable. Mary Matsuda shows us that same truth, but from the heart. And she show us how, with courage, it is possible to overcome the worst of experiences and still maintain ones dignity. This should be required reading for all of us and our children. The book lays bare a shameful chapter in our country's history that we must never be allowed to forget. Best of all, it's a great read.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Dori Jones Yang on May 19, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was not yet born when the U.S. government decided to round up tens of thousands of Japanese-American citizens and herd them into prison camps solely because of their Japanese heritage. It was not until I was an adult that I even heard of the internment camps. Yet after reading this book, Looking Like the Enemy, I feel as though I myself had been locked behind that barbed wire, feeling the depression and despair of an uncertain future.

The author was seventeen when she was imprisoned - old enough to understand the implications, young enough to rage at the injustice. Her own government, to which she pledged allegiance daily in school, imprisoned her without cause. In this book, she exposes the raw emotions - fear, anger, worry, doubt - that she felt during those formative years of her life, and tells vivid stories I will never forget. She persevered and endured, strengthened by the wisdom of her mother.

The book has changed me profoundly; I will never look at the removal of civil liberties in the same way again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth A. Root on January 27, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even if one is aware of the internment of the American Japanese, I doubt that most people can form any real idea of what it was like without reading a personal chronicle like this. It is difficult to express how painful it is to read, and I already knew the basic story. Sure, now we know that it didn't turn into a second Holocaust, but the people in the camps didn't have that comforting foreknowledge. One needs to be reminded that although the intense portions of a tragedy may be long over with, the ramifications for the people who suffered through it can last all their lives, even for those who didn't lose everything that they had owned before the catastrophe.

Jeanne Wakatusi Houston also wrote a classic memoir: Farewell to Manzanar: A True Story of Japanese American Experience During and After the World War II Internment, and it is well worth reading both of the books for the similarities and differences between the two experiences. Houston was perhaps 8 or 10 years younger than Mary Matsuda, and her family dynamics were quite different, so they really complement one another. Being older, Mary Matsuda had to confront personally and directly issues that Jeanne Wakatusi Houston didn't, although of course her family members did. JWH tells us more about her life after the camps; MMG ends her books in 1945, with only an afterword summarizing the later lives of the Matsudas.

I found the book very vivid. I could easily imagine how I would feel having to destroy so much family history, even being afraid to keep a set of dolls lest it add fuel to the anti-Japanese fervor.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Robert Hutchings on May 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
For sixty years, Mary Matsuda Gruenewald chose not to talk about her experiences in the Japanese-American internment camps during the Second World War. Forced into those camps as a confused, na?ve seventeen-year-old, she was unable to comprehend her situation, and until the early twenty-first century was not prepared to explore this region of her personal - and her country's - history. When in her seventies, her children grown, her parents and brother gone, she finally admitted to herself the importance of stepping beyond "the self-imposed barbed-wire fences" (p. x) and telling her story.

Mary Matsuda moved to Puget Sound with her family at the age of two, in 1927. She and her older brother, Yoneichi, aged four, were American citizens by birth. Her parents had emigrated from Japan, but due to complex and unforgiving American immigration laws at the time, they remained Japanese citizens. Life on Vashon Island was "idyllic," (p. 1); her family rented a small strawberry farm which they worked; Mary and her brother attended the local school and church; and all the residents were friendly and warm-hearted. There were only a handful of Japanese on the island, and Mary was one of the few in her schoolhouse, but rarely were any in her family victims of prejudice.

In December 1941, the Matsuda family trembled as they listened to radio broadcasts of the Pearl Harbor bombings. Though their neighbors and friends gathered around them in support, and though they were loyal residents, citizens, and believers in America, they were concerned the government might move against them. They burned all their cultural belongings; all their records, all their dolls, and all their photographs. The only Japanese item they did not burn was her parents' copy of the New Testament.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa28df5ac)