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The Lord's Oysters (Maryland Paperback Bookshelf) Paperback


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The Lord's Oysters (Maryland Paperback Bookshelf) + Chesapeake: A Novel
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Product Details

  • Series: Maryland Paperback Bookshelf
  • Paperback: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (March 1, 1977)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801819598
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801819599
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,201,613 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This is literally a wonderful book. The wonder is that of a boy, Noah Marlin, growing up along the Chester River near the Chesapeake Bay. Inevitably there is something of Twain and Tarkington in his pranks, hooky-playing, and fishing. But other qualities distinctly Gilbert Byron's make the novel more than a nostalgic re-creation of an American childhood. This isn't childhood we're reading about, it's life.

(Saturday Review)

Crabs, perch, terrapin and frogs enter the episodes, but they are the only things fishy about this very happy sequence of a boy's growing.

(New York Times Book Review)

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Read Mr. Byron's poetry, especially These Chesapeake Men.
"curmudge"
I have read it three times, even as recent as this December and it keeps making me fall in love with it.
philip skipp
Byron does a great job in not only spinning a good yarn but to really create an environment.
Charles Comer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book was given to me for Christmas and I read it before New Years! It has been compared to Huck. Finn, And rightfully so. The story of a young Noah and his adventures on the Eastern Shore of Maryland is very realistic. It is also informative to older folks who may not realize that across the bay from Baltimore & DC there was a little piece of America still holding strong to God, Truth, Innosence, and ofcourse the mighty Blue Crab!---And you know what? there still is!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By "curmudge" on December 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
Eastern Shore, please, with a capital E and a capital S. Gilbert Byron grew up in Chestertown on the banks of the Chester River in Kent County on Maryland's Eastern Shore in the first decades of the 1900s. Now, that century is coming to a close. But, Gilbert Byron's books about this part of the world - insulated, isolated in another time -will live forever. This work is not just for children. Adults will enjoy it, too. My father was a friend of Gilbert's growing up. And I knew Gilbert Byron well as editor of the Kent County News. He kept writing to the end living in a cabin he built himself on San Domingo Creek near St. Michaels on the Eastern Shore. By the way, he also was instrumental in sending Harold Baines to the major leagues, thanks to Bill Veeck. But, that is another whole story. Enough. Read The Lord's Oysters. Read Chesapeake Duke and fall in love with Chesapeake Bay Retrievers. Read Mr. Byron's poetry, especially These Chesapeake Men. If you want to know the Chesapeake and The Shore read Gilbert Byron.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Charles Comer on April 15, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Gilbert Byron's two autobiographical novel/memoirs, The Lord's Oysters and Done Crabbin': Noah Leaves the River trace the youth and teen years into college of Noah Marlin. Like Byron, Marlin grew up along the Chester River on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay, and, as anyone from the region can attest, the Bay and its tributaries is a character unto itself, and figures prominently along with all of the other colorful people that surround Byron's young protagonist.

These books are comprised of many short chapters, some flowing one to the next, others not, which suggests that these books -- particularly the first, The Lord's Oysters -- formed as a collection of short stories and expanding out from there. The prose is charmingly naive, but very sincere, and enchantingly observant and contemplative. Young Noah really connects to his surroundings and deeply relates to his family and friends. Byron does a great job in not only spinning a good yarn but to really create an environment.

The Lord's Oysters, written decades before Done Crabbin', is a bit more raw than its sequel. However, these two books seamlessly flow, one to the other. So much so I would advocate publishing them together. Nevertheless, either can be read without the other, but obviously Done Crabbin' will be more meaningful after having read The Lord's Oysters. Furthermore, as Done Crabbin' ends, and Noah realizes he has forever left the river and is "done crabbin'", the impact and emotion is poignant.

The Lord's Oysters is a bit more whimsical, therefore, compared to the slightly more nostalgic and contemplative Done Crabbin'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 8, 1998
Format: Paperback
I read this book when I was 12 or so (1967) and really enjoyed it. I am anxious to read it as an adult and see if it is as good as I remember. Back then, I recall that it made me really want to go to the Maryland's Chesapeake Bay. Haven't made it yet, but still want to go.
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