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Lords of Waterdeep: A Dungeons & Dragons Board Game


List Price: $49.99
Price: $33.98 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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  • An exciting Euro-style board game set in Waterdeep, the greatest city and jewel of the Forgotten Realms
  • This immersive game casts players as Lords of Waterdeep who hire adventurers to complete quests
  • Game play: 1 hour
  • Perfect for 2 to 5 players
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Frequently Bought Together

Lords of Waterdeep: A Dungeons & Dragons Board Game + Lords of Waterdeep: Scoundrels of Skullport Expansion Board Game + Betrayal At House On The Hill - 2nd Edition
Price for all three: $105.76

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WARNING:
CHOKING HAZARD -- Small parts. Not for children under 3 yrs.

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 11.2 x 3 x 14.1 inches ; 3.7 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 3.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • Origin: USA
  • ASIN: 0786959916
  • Item model number: 5513165
  • Manufacturer recommended age: 12 - 15 years
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,369 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (234 customer reviews)
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Product Description

Product Description

Waterdeep, the City of Splendors--the most resplendent jewel in the Forgotten Realms, and a den of political intrigue and shady back-alley dealings. In this game, the players are powerful lords vying for control of this great city. Its treasures and resources are ripe for the taking, and that which cannot be gained through trickery and negotiation must be taken by force!

Lords of Waterdeep is a Euro-style board game for 2-5 players.

Components:
 Game board
 Rulebook
 5 card stock player mats
 121 Intrigue, Quest, and Role cards
 130 wooden cubes, pawns, and score pieces
 Wooden player markers
 Card stock tiles and tokens representing buildings, gold coins, and victory points

From the Manufacturer

Waterdeep, the City of Splendors—the most resplendent jewel in the Forgotten Realms, and a den of political intrigue and shady back-alley dealings. In this game, the players are powerful lords vying for control of this great city. Its treasures and resources are ripe for the taking, and that which cannot be gained through trickery and negotiation must be taken by force. Lords of Waterdeep is a strategy board game for 2-5 players. You take on the role of one of the masked Lords of Waterdeep, secret rulers of the city. Through your agents, you recruit adventurers to go on quests on your behalf, earning rewards and increasing your influence over the city. Expand the city by purchasing new buildings that open up new actions on the board, and hinder—or help—the other lords by playing Intrigue cards to enact your carefully laid plans.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
198
4 star
31
3 star
5
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 234 customer reviews
This game is a lot of fun.
Danielle
This game has similar mechanics to Stone Age, Caylus and other worker placement games, but if you like Euro games and D&D, this is a great one to pick up.
T. Gilbert
The game really is simple and easy to teach/learn, but the game offers a lot of strategy.
How Lou Sees It

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

103 of 109 people found the following review helpful By Tactitles VINE VOICE on March 30, 2012
Format: Toy
If you are a eurogamer but not particularly drawn to fantasy themed dungeon games, please keep reading this. If you are a dungeon game fanatic with no euro experience, you also should keep reading. This game is a straight euro-style game, with a clever fantasy theme wrapped around it. Mechanically, it runs on worker placement and resource management principles. There are some cool cards, but the game pieces are... drumroll... wooden cubes. And some meeples. And some victory point tokens. Eurogamers will rejoice, and dungeon crawl gamers might be surprised. You won't find any miniatures here.

But this is far from an average euro with cubes. It is actually a very well designed game, with many winning ways to approach it. The object is to complete Quest cards, which each show cube requirements (called adventurers) and rewards. Four types of "adventurers" are represented by cubes. Orange for fighters, white for clerics, black for rogues, and purple for wizards. Quests cards are colored as well. So an orange Quest (called a warfare quest) requires, as its main element, orange cubes. White Quest cards require white cubes, etc. But each will usually require a lesser amount of other resources, such as gold or other colored cubes. Victory points are rewarded for completed quests, and a few other hidden bonus points are awarded at the end.

Standard stuff, right? No.This game works so well because it is fairly quick, and actions are tightly controlled because of limited places on the board to deploy your agents to obtain resources. Think Stone Age, but without as much scoring complication. It's not exactly the same, but similar. In addition to getting and completing quests, you can obtain and play Intrigue cards, which give you various actions.
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51 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Kartik S. Santhanakrishnan on March 22, 2012
Format: Toy
For those who've played Agricola and Caylus, this game uses similar concepts to those two games. Your meeples (people) collect resources or money. I call them resources or cubes but these are fighters, rogues and so on, in the game's terminology. You use these to gain special powers or victory points or build buildings. Meeples can visit any building to get more resources or money than they normally would. However, the owner of the building i.e. the original builder gets rent or resources when that happens. Players can use intrigue cards for one time special effects. Everyone also gets a special secret end of game bonus card such as "Each building you control gives you 6 points at the end of the game". With a combination of these different actions, you aim to gain more victory points than anyone else.

The only reason I'm not giving it 5 stars is that it didn't really leaving craving for more like "Through the Ages" did. The reason may be that it is not too original and is so similar to other games out there. That said, the game is interactive, gives everyone an equal chance of winning and anyone can come back from behind and win the game. I find a game that always keeps players in with a chance of winning to be exciting. There are many different strategies to pursue. Overall, fun game.
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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Jon Cooper on April 24, 2012
Format: Toy Verified Purchase
Lords of Waterdeep is based in the Dungeons and Dragons world. More specifically, in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting. Unlike the other board games that have been released by Wizards of the Coast over the past few years that are also set in the D&D world (eg, Wrath of Ashardalon and Conquest of Norrath), this game is pure euro. For all intents and purposes, it is a worker-placement game with a pick-up and deliver mechanic (no, really, it's funner than that might sound!).

The idea behind the game is the following: Each player takes on the role of a lord of Waterdeep - one of several actors who essentially controls the politics and economy of the City of Splendor (as Waterdeep is known). To increase their influence, they hire adventurers to complete quests on their behalf. For example, you might hire a few rogues to infiltrate one of the many guilds composing Waterdeep's market economy. The more quests you complete, the better you do in the game - the player who completes the most (and most valuable) quests, wins.

Game play

The game play blends the theme with the mechanics almost seamlessly. The game plays over eight rounds, and each round players take turns assigning their agents to different buildings. Each building procures the player something, but most commonly a collection of adventurers. Adventurers come in four flavors: clerics, rogues, fighters, and wizards (in other words, classic D&D archetypes). After assigning agents to a building and collecting its benefits, a player can complete one quest per turn. To complete a quest, you must return a certain type and amount of adventurers to the general stock. In return, you earn victory points - and sometimes gold and more adventurers, or even advantages that last throughout the duration of the game.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mike M. on May 7, 2012
Format: Toy
I'm a D&D gamer from quite a ways back, and I had my doubts about this game. I checked out the new 4th edition tabletop game when it first came out, and over a brief period of time it fell out of favor with me. D&D 4e can be a fun game, but it lost something for me in all the focus on tactical combat. The more recent D&D board game entries from Wizards of the Coast seemed like they took tabletop D&D and turned it into a simple board game.

The 4e connection to Lords of Waterdeep is what worried me. As it turns out, there is no tabletop D&D to be found in this game. Instead, it takes the city of Waterdeep as the setting, and allows you to be a secret ruler sending out adventurers on quests to collect victory points.

As a tabletop D&D gamer, I instantly found an attraction to this game soon after learning how to play. The thought of being the person in charge of gathering adventurers and sending them out to do my bidding was very appealing to me; finally I would get a sense of how it feels to be on the other side of the adventure. Sure, I've run games as the Dungeon Master before, but the Lords of Waterdeep are essentially non-player characters; extras in the background that the players don't get to interact with very often. To make these powerful extras take centerstage as playable characters was an exciting prospect to me.

As a board game collector, I was extremely impressed with the packaging. After you have punched out all the cardboard pieces and followed the guide provided in the instructions, everything is sorted and organized to facilitate fast setup. Every group of tokens, meeples, cards, and tiles is separated into their own tightly constructed compartment.
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