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A Lost Argument: A Latter-Day Novel Paperback – September 3, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 260 pages
  • Publisher: Strange Violin Editions (September 3, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0983748411
  • ISBN-13: 978-0983748410
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,500,573 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An inquisitive mind always considers other possibilities ... Mormon student Marguerite clashes with an atheist in a discussion of faith and morality. Through their debate, love begins to blooms and doubts form on both sides ... An intriguing delve into faith and what it means to people in the bigger picture." - Midwest Book Review

"Blasphemous!" - Hemant Mehta, author of I Sold My Soul on eBay: Viewing Faith Through an Atheist's Eyes

"[A]nyone who has progressed from a 'simple' view of faith to an increasingly complex and nuanced view, ... Mormon or not, theist or not, anyone who advocates for the liberal arts and its capacity to develop and sharpen a person's thinking should read this novel." - Irresistible (Dis)Grace

"I found this book with its portrayal of the stark realities of relationships and the challenges of existence a clear-eyed examination of some of life's most difficult questions ... It follows a path that ranges from Kierkegaard to the Marquis de Sade." - Steven L. Peck, author of The Scholar of Moab

"Just think of the sparks that could fly when an atheist and a believer go at it hammer and tongs! [T]he character development was plausible and compelling, the philosophical exchanges were well-written, and the slow creep of doubt on the main character's mind happened in a very realistic way." - Adam Lee, Daylight Atheism/BigThink

About the Author

Therese Doucet grew up in Tucson, Arizona, with a lot of cactuses in her front yard. She studied philosophy at Brigham Young University and earned graduate degrees in cultural history and public policy from the University of Chicago and The George Washington University. She lives and works in Washington, D.C.

More About the Author

Therese Doucet grew up in Tucson, Arizona, with a lot of cactuses in her front yard. She studied philosophy at Brigham Young University and earned graduate degrees in cultural history and public policy from the University of Chicago and The George Washington University. She lives and works in Washington, D.C.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By V. Cano on December 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is an intriguing book. It was a fun and thought-provoking story that surprised me with its sharp psychology as well as with its take on philosophy.
I enjoyed the main character, Marguerite, a complex young woman searching for Truth, and, possibly, for love. Her diary entries were my favorite part, since we got an honest look into the psyche of someone struggling with faith and with life in general. She had some moments where her indecisiveness made the reader want to throttle her, but I suppose that's something that we all go through, so in that manner, is portrayed realistically. The rest of the characters are also well-written, especially John, who is just as interesting. I actually wish we'd learned a bit more about him as the novel progresses, but it doesn't really deter from the plot as a whole.
The writing is clear, with very little grammatical mistakes. Although there is a lot of philosophy, it is clearly written, even, I think for a lay-person to grasp without too much problems. I found myself engrossed in the existential crises that Marguerite faces, nodding my head at some of her thoughts and feelings. I can easily recommend this for those of you looking for something that will provoke a very heated discussion with your own head.
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By Mom of 4 on March 1, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was an intriguing, and sometimes painful, look at the struggle to find meaning in life, to find meaning in faith. Marguerite's inner turmoil was alternately completely relate-able, and completely frustrating to me. As I journeyed with her I wondered why she made the decisions she did. Why not ask for more help from friends and family? Why not seek professional medical help sooner? Why wait on a silent God? How can she keep having faith when she's not getting any answers? Why resign herself to a life devoid of happiness? I was both impressed with and frustrated by her tenacity.
Part 1 of the book was a great story, the characters were real and I could understand and sympathize with them. In part 2 it went from story form to diary form and I felt like it lost some of its narrative flow. I would have liked to read more about Marguerite's experiences overseas and in graduate school, especially as it was here that she came to a final resolution of the problem of faith.
Overall I would recommend this book, it's well-written, well-researched, and entertaining. It took the reader along on the journey to understand faith. I found myself pondering the role of faith in my own life and redefining and reaffirming my own core belief system.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Walt Eddy on April 6, 2012
Format: Paperback
Theresa Doucet is a very good writer. I hope she keeps writing, and I look forward to reading more of her work.

Let me first say how I came to this novel, A LOST ARGUMENT.

I follow a few Mormon blogs, including some a little more scholarly than others. (I aspire.) Since I do some writing myself, I also pay particular attention to new writers in the Mormon tradition, since that's my background, too. On one of the blogs, I noticed a discussion about this book. I followed some hyperlinks. Consequently, I learned that Doucet is quite capable in the realm of philosophy. (I aspire to that a little bit, too.) I also noticed that she participates in Goodreads, so I sent her a friend request. She graciously accepted. Sometime later, Goodreads sent me some of her reviews, including one of ANGLE OF REPOSE by Wallace Stegner. She had given it what, in my opinion, was a less than gracious rating, so I engaged her about that. I found her responses articulate and well-argued, and I was duly impressed. Subsequently, she suggested perhaps we ought to exchange books. I would read hers and she would read one of mine. She sent me A LOST ARGUMENT. So now I will attempt to review it and tell you what I think.

The protagonist of A LOST ARGUMENT is Marguerite Farnsworth. She lives in Arizona. She's a young LDS (member of the church of Jesus Christ of latter-day Saints) student going to BYU, the Mormon university in Provo, Utah. She has a brother and sister who have other lives and more or less ignore Marguerite. She has a father, a cardiologist, who works incessantly. Her mother, too, seems too busy for Marguerite. That says a lot about her life right there.

The first sentence of the book's prologue sets forth, in my opinion, the book's premise.
Read more ›
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael E McComb on May 7, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Western, Victorian, and tapered resignations. There is depth of feeling and development of understanding in the adventures of this young woman, extant her sheltered beginnings. A philosopher's stone, a prophet's prose... There are many chuckles, blushes, and more questions upon questions which accompany the read, and linger on reflection... Now what?
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