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Lost Cat Hardcover – July 9, 2013


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Lost Cat + Athos in America + Almost Silent
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics; 1 edition (July 9, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1606996428
  • ISBN-13: 978-1606996423
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 6.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #493,362 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Walking home one rainy night, PI Dan Delon finds a cat under a Dumpster adjacent to a homemade poster about a lost cat. He takes it to its owner, Charlotte Mardou, and chats with her until the rain stops. The next day, they make a date. But she’s a no-show, doesn’t answer her phone or doorbell, is never at the bookshop she owns, and hasn’t been reported missing. At a dead end, Dan takes his next case: searching for a painting a wheelchair-bound old millionaire wants and meeting the kind of resistance Philip Marlowe met sleuthing for another wheelchair-bound old millionaire in The Big Sleep. Hard-boiled fans will have already sniffed out the allusion in the bookshop, but however the scent entices them, they’ll have to swallow the immense sf MacGuffin Jason inserts into the lengthiest and maybe most romantic mystery scenario his lean, animal-headed personae have ever performed. Luckily, if the plot developments are Chandleresque, the dialogue largely is not, which entirely suits the solemn-faced cast, who make Bogie look like Jim Carrey. Delicious . . . heartwarming, too. --Ray Olson

About the Author

Jason hails from Oslo, Norway, but currently resides in the south of France. The Harvey and Eisner Award-winner continues to create new books at a breakneck pace—his books include Werewolves of Montpellier; Low Moon; Pocket Full of Rain and Other Stories; Hey, Wait...; Sshhhh!; The Iron Wagon; What I Did (collecting the previous three volumes); I Killed Adolf Hitler; The Last Musketeer; The Left Bank Gang; Why Are You Doing This?; The Living and the Dead; Meow, Baby!; You Can't Get There from Here; Tell Me Something; and Almost Silent (collecting the previous four volumes) and (with Fabien Vehlmann) Isle of 100,000 Graves.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Elkin on August 3, 2013
Format: Hardcover
More and more in my reviews of comics, I find that I often talk about how many cartoonists use their medium to explore themes of loneliness, isolation, and our inability to connect with others. It's as if artists seem to be especially drawn to these themes, perhaps because the creative process tends to be one that occurs in isolation, or perhaps it's because the creators themselves are outsiders, observers, the kind of people who don't easily "fit in".

Write what you know, and all that.

Interestingly enough, though, art itself crosses the barriers between the isolation and the individual. A creator who examines their own inability to connect with others ends up connecting, in a sense, to similarly minded people who encounter the creator's work. By putting form to loneliness, it becomes a shared experience. The act of creation creates community; were it not for the impulse spawned in isolation, the singular insights would never be heard.

Thus is the power of art. Only the creative individual can present their own loneliness, isolation, and inability to connect with others in a way that brings us together.

Norwegian comic creator Jason does just this in his latest graphic novel, Lost Cat. In 150 four-panel pages, Jason uses his sparse, clean, black-and-white art (with the help of the late Kim Thompson's excellent translation) to tell the story of Dan Delon, a detective in the classic Raymond Chandler/Dashiell Hammett/Jim Thompson vein. In Lost Cat, Delon is vastly and stupefyingly alone and his loneliness is palpable thanks to Jason's pacing, clean lines, and use of negative space. When characters actually come together and physically touch in this book, it is either to inflict damage or perpetuate isolation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D-Dub on January 11, 2014
Format: Hardcover
I read Lost Cat after binge reading super hero graphic novels. As a result, I flew through it. I thought it was terrible. However, most reviews of Lost Cat have been overwhelmingly positive. I made an adult beverage, kicked back and took my time reading it.

I liked it a lot more the 2nd time. I was disappointed in the ending but other than that enjoyed it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By the overmouth on August 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful graphic novel. It's understated story-telling and sympathetic art and characters makes for some thought-provoking and entertaining reading. It may be Jason's best work to date. It's easy to read but if you read it too quickly you might miss some of the smaller details he has in there, and it' the type of book you won't mind reading twice. Highly recommended.
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By keiko m. on May 9, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've read all of Jason's work (that I know of) and this is definitely one of my favorites. With his recent work, it's been hit or miss with me, as I sometimes feel like his stories are indulgently depressing just for the sake of it. haha To be fair, I'm not one of those people who write off things they don't get as "bad"--so I am willing to concede that I maybe missed the point of the stories I found to be depressing for the sake of being depressing. That said, this was not the case with "Lost Cat". I've read this story two or three times now, and the ending (which I felt was the best/strongest part) made me cry every single time. (Another favorite Jason tale of mine, "Why Are You Doing This?" also gets me the same way.) As other reviews have said, his use of silence is incredibly powerful; I feel like I'm watching a movie sometimes.

Anyway, other reviews have addressed the story specifics enough already, but I just wanted to put my two cents in. if you're a fan of Jason, you won't be disappointed!!
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By Amazon Customer on December 8, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I'm relatively new to graphic novels. So I may not be the best one to judge.

I liked Jason's sketches and the nods to noir detective genre. I liked the bizarre twist. Still, the content was too brief for me.

Don't know if it's important to anyone, but the binding of the book is great. High quality production. It will be a nice collector's item for those that like his work.
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