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65 of 66 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The greatest hits that never were...
If you've followed Pearl Jam at all, you're well aware of their habit of putting otherwise unreleased songs on singles, soundtracks, compilation/benefit albums, etc. So, someone who doesn't have the time or money to track down all these songs can miss a lot of great music. Plus, who wants to risk getting a soundtrack that sucks otherwise?
For those who don't want to...
Published on December 9, 2003 by Timothy Read

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Besides a few B-sides I can put the rest a-side
A loyal and sweetly put together rarities double disc from Pearl Jam is an undeniable must in any fans collection simply for the handful of amazing tracks which sometimes even go further then their best (ten-era) material ever has. Tracks that any fan already probably heard from singles (Alone, Yellow Ledbetter) remain some of their strongest rock, capturing the...
Published on September 18, 2007 by IRate


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65 of 66 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The greatest hits that never were..., December 9, 2003
By 
Timothy Read (Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
If you've followed Pearl Jam at all, you're well aware of their habit of putting otherwise unreleased songs on singles, soundtracks, compilation/benefit albums, etc. So, someone who doesn't have the time or money to track down all these songs can miss a lot of great music. Plus, who wants to risk getting a soundtrack that sucks otherwise?
For those who don't want to spend a small fortune getting all kinds of singles and other albums, Lost Dogs assembles some notables (and unknowns) in a simple, great package.
Lost Dogs covers most of their career, with B-sides and from virtually every era (Vitalogy is notably absent). Some have been heard before -- the ubiquitous Yellow Ledbetter and Last Kiss, and some were previously unavailable -- Sad and Fatal, among others.
What sets this compilation apart from most is that there are so many songs that you hear and wonder how they decided to cut them. It's not a collection of weak filler material. Several of these songs could have done very well on commercial radio. Most everything is really good.
Of course, the double album is difficult to nail perfectly. Usually there are some dogs (pun not intended) among everything else. But the bulk of the album is great and overshadows the occasional misstep.
Purists take note: Some of the songs on here may not be the original version you're familiar with. Fans have noted differences in a couple songs, but for the most part, it's nothing bad.
While it may not be everyone's dream compilation (I wish they would have included State of Love and Trust), the amount of stuff that is on here is great. And some songs -- Sad, Alone, Undone, Fatal, etc. are worth the price of admission alone.
If you're a fan, you owe it to yourself to check it out if you haven't already.
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49 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Compilation of Essential PJ Rarities, November 22, 2003
By 
Calvin93 "calvin93" (Roslyn Heights, NY United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
30 great b-sides, rarities, and unreleased tracks to please any Pearl Jam fan. I was thrilled to hear the early b-sides (Alone, Footsteps, Dirty Frank) plus the import release of TEN closing track Wash to remember the band in its heyday, and equally enjoyed Riot Act's extra track Down - excellent. These coulda-been hits are interspersed with other cuts that either never made the studio albums or were on benefit albums (Whale Song) for a truly enjoyable selection. No, not every song is a classic (though Last Kiss is included, which was perhaps one of their biggest radio hits, as well as Yellow Ledbetter, which enjoyed some radio play in 1993 and is now a concert-closing staple). But even the eclectic songs (Black, Red, Yellow - complete with Dennis Rodman's voice, and Sweet Lew) are interesting to listen to. I marveled at the instrumental genius of Brother and the quiet intensity of Dead Man Walking. Anyone who has followed Pearl Jam this far would enjoy this collection. For a compilation of "extras", the material here is stronger than many bands' actual releases. Plus, LOST DOGS includes interesting liner notes with todbits about each song from different members of the band. What a treat!
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A mixed bag of tricks, November 14, 2003
By 
TCompton (Alexandria, VA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
From the beginning you can tell Lost Dogs is a collection of songs that either didn't make an album because they didn't make the final cut or couldn't fit on the album. For those Pearl Jam fanatics, you'll notice the re-recorded versions of "Alone" and "Wash" and the added harmonica to the same "Footsteps" recording found on the Jeremy single.
The first disk is much louder than the second. Stand-outs from disk one are "Sad," "Alone," "Undone," and the concert encore "Yellow Ledbetter." Songs that don't quite impress are "Don't Give Me No Lip," and the MOM songs "Gremmie Out of Control," and "The Whale Song."
Disk two is made up of rare B-sides and old Christmas singles along with an instumental version of the very rare "Brother." I'm not sure why they chose not to put the vocals on this song, but from the guitar riffs, you can tell why several die-hard fans consider this jewel a personal favorite. In general disk two flows better and has a little better collection of tunes. Disk two low points are "Sweet Lew," and the rare but uninspiring "Bee Girl."
Missing from this collection are "State of Love and Trust," "Breath," and "Crazy Mary" (although "Crazy Mary" may have copyright restrictions associated with it).
Overall it's a good collection of songs but not something that really feels or flows like an album. The previously unreleased songs "Sad," and "Undone" and Christmas singles "Strangest Tribe," "Driftin," and "Let Me Sleep (it's Christmas Time)" make this album special.
I would recommend it to any fan of Pearl Jam. For the casual listener it's worth buying even if only to get the young Pearl Jam songs "Yellow Ledbetter" and "Alone."
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lost Dogs; a fitting title., November 2, 2004
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
At the peak of the 90s alt-rock scene, Pearl Jam was the biggest band in the world. Nirvana may have kick-started their fame, but "Ten" climbed the charts quicker and higher than "Nevermind" ever has, selling over 12 million copies (as of 2003). Pearl Jam wasn't about to compromise their music for fame and glamour, which is clear when examining their career. Although Pearl Jam had created the sound of an entire decade, they continued to duck the spotlight, by making very few videos, giving very few interviews, then enduring a long battle against Ticketmaster, that lowered their popularity a few more notches. After releasing "Vs." in 1993, each Pearl Jam album that followed played to a smaller audience. Ultimately, Pearl Jam went from being the biggest band in the world, to being the biggest cult band in the world, by choice.

Due to the way Pearl Jam has gone about making albums in the past, their are several "Lost Dogs" included here. Since each album plays to a small audience, and includes an underlying theme, several songs that were officially released were shelved if they did not fit in with the rest of the material, and never made it to a proper Pearl Jam album. This is why "Lost Dogs" is necessary, a compilation of their best B-sides, stray singles, and compilation tracks, laid out in non-chronological sequence.

The variety of material is very desirable. This is Pearl Jam at their most experimental, their hardest rocking, most relaxed and most intimate in their career. "Lost Dogs" captures what the band sounded like at their peak, capturing their true passion. This proves that they had what it took to release another "Ten" album, but wisely chose not to.

Some standouts on the first disc include "All Night," "Sad," "Down," "Undone," and the concert favorite "Yellow Ledbetter". In my opinion, the second disc is much better. It's more relaxed and chilled out. They experiment with harmonica, and other sorts of production. Standouts include "Fatal," "Other Side," "Footsteps," "Dead Man Walking," my personal favorite "Drifting," "Sweet Lew," and the concert favorite "Last Kiss".

All in all, B-side and rarities compilations aren't supposed to be this good. B-sides by definition, are good and familiar, but not as good as what made the album. Pearl Jam shatters this definition, leaving the common listener in awe. I personally believe that this album is better than most of their studio albums; how refreshing.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Our best aural snapshot of Pearl Jam as a band, May 10, 2004
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
For those who have been really been following Pearl Jam know that their numerous B-sides and rarities often rivaled and sometimes surpassed the songs on their albums. I could easily name off twenty Pearl Jam b-sides that I think are just as good as what made the records. I have long been dreaming of when Pearl Jam would make it easy for the rest of the world, other than the devotees who will find every b-side they can get their hands on, to have access to their stupendous catalogue music that never made the final cut, for whatever reason. Indeed, I wish that the four songs from RIOT ACT had replaced some of the tracks on the last half of that album, which would have made it much stronger. They could have cut "You Are," "Help, Help," and "˝ Full" or even "Green Disease" and "Get Right" for the four songs on this record.

So when I heard news of LOST DOGS, I was really excited. There were a full ELEVEN unreleased songs included on this. Looking at the tracking list, though, I found it hard to believe what had been left on and what had been included. Where was "I Got Id?" The two Singles soundtrack songs? "Leatherman?" "Crazy Mary?" "Angel?" "Sonic Reducer?" "Long Road?" There are a few songs that were included ("Gremmie," "Leaving Here," "U," "Black, Red, and Yellow,") that I would have left off to make room for some of the better songs. Listening to the record now, though, I understand why those `slight' moments are on here. Still, it would have been nice to round out LOST DOGS with more material, with each disc only holding a little over fifty minutes of music.

Pearl Jam's albums were always very tightly controlled. They also always gave the impression of being very sour-faced and always very serious, like the smart kid always studying and never really cutting up with the rest of the guys. Ever since TEN, each Pearl Jam release has played to a smaller and smaller audience, as Pearl Jam becoming more of a cult band than the major bridge between 1970s hard arena rock and grunge that they were back in the start of their career. Pearl Jam was the biggest band of the early 1990s in terms of record sales, not Nirvana. Although Nirvana may have started off the whole shebang, it was Pearl Jam that kept it going. As time went on, they become more and more of an anachronism, far afield of what was happening in the mainstream music scene. Especially now, with Cobain dead over ten years, and listening to the radio and looking at what records are really selling, you can tell that Pearl Jam is really alone in the world, the last survivors of an era long since gone. That is why this album is such a tremendous addition to their catalogue, because it follows its own internal logic, just like any other PJ album.

LOST DOGS captures Pearl Jam at its rawest, loosest, and funniest moments. What's more, it plays like a real Pearl Jam record, not a rarities release with substandard material that didn't make the cut. If you weren't familiar with the rarities to begin with, and approached it as a regular release, you wound think this was Pearl Jam at their most accessible since VS. LOST DOGS help show that the decision to shy away from the mainstream and release very sombre, serious, and in some places experimental albums was a deliberate move on their part, and that they could cut up and have fun playing music. It captures the essence of the band as sincere, eclectic, and uncompromising musicians. For those who want to know what Pearl Jam is really all about, then this is the record to get. As a portrait of the band and an encapsulation of their talent and what they stand for, this is, strangely enough, their best release.
P. S. For those interested, the majority of the already released B-Sides ARE NOT THE SAME VERSIONS found on their singles. These tracks below are alternate versions of the official B-Sides and Christmas Singles. Some of the differences are quite noticeable. I much prefer the original B-Side to "Alone." "Footsteps," for some bizaare reason, has a harmonica over dubbed onto the original version. The original mix without the harmonica sounds so much better. With the harmonica, you suddenly get a vision of Vedder doing a Dylan impression, strumming his guitar and blowing his mouth harp. There are some slight lyrical changes to "Hard to Imagine" and "Drifting." In the first song, LOST DOGS cuts the F word. In "Drifting," instead of singing "they get so d-ed excited," he excised "d-ed." "Drifting" is a lot more fun to sing along to a lot better with that word in there. "Wash" is one of the few exceptions to the rule, with the LOST DOGS version sounding better than the regular release from the "Alive" single. The worst, however, is "Dirty Frank." The original version is much funnier, with Vedder continually repeating the line from Shaft: "Dirty Frank is a bad mother - hey, shut your mouth!" Vedder talks a lot more in the regular release.

"Alone."
"Hard to Imagine."
"Footsteps"
"Wash."
"Dead Man."
"Strangest Tribe."
"Drifting."
"Dirty Frank."
"Brother."

(While never officially released, "Brother" is a well known to Pearl Jam collectors as a demo cut for TEN, along with the still unreleased song "Just a Girl." The most common version floating around is a full song with vocals. On LOST DOGS it just an instrumental version. The song is missing something without the lyrics.)
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Addition to the Pearl Jam Catalogue, November 19, 2003
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
As a long time fan of Pearl Jam it is great to finally get the long rumored compilation of B-sides and rarities. "Lost Dogs" (30 tracks plus 1 hidden; 113 min.) is a redemption after last year's uneven and ultimate disappointing "Riot Act" album. I say this because "Lost Dogs" feels like another "proper" album, more so than a compilation.
CD1 (14 tracks; 53 min.) starts off with one of the strongest tracks, the heavy "All Night", from the "No Code" sessions (it still remains my favorite PJ album). "Sad" and "Down" are almost as powerful, very good. Other highlights include "Black, Red, Yellow" (also from the "No Code" sessions), "U", and of course "Yellow Bedletter" the concert fave which finally gets released on album.
CD2 (16 tracks plus 1 hidden; 58 min.) generally speaking finds a more laid-back, accoustic Pearl Jam at work. Again the highlights are many: "Fatal" (from the "Binaural" sessions), "Footsteps" (from the "Ten" sessions) and not the least several of the Christmas songs released previously as fan club singles: "Strangest Vibe", "Drifting" and "Let Me Sleep" almost feel like the band jamming in your home room, just great. The hidden track (about 5 min. after "Bee Girl" ends) is "4/20/02", Ed solo, lamenting the death of Alice in Chains lead singer Layne Staley that very day, hauntingly beautiful.
In all, this is of course an essential album for any Pearl Jam fan, but I venture to say it's also very accesible to the casual fan, simply because of the strenght of the songs and the smart sequencing of the tracks. In the excellent liner notes, the band says there's lots more tracks like these in the vaults. Here's hoping "Lost Dogs 2" will see the daylight!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the overlooked secret track, June 27, 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
This is a great CD, especially given that none of these songs were originally deemed great enough to warrant inclusion on a regular album. For greater detail about the overall greatness of the CD, see other reviews. What I'm concerned about is the lack of recognition being given to far and away the best song on this double album, a secret track at the end of the second album. The last listed song on the second CD, Bee Girl, is very short (and pretty unremarkable by the rest of the album's standards), lasting less than 2 minutes. Maybe the majority of the owners of this CD just absent-mindedly stop the CD as soon as "Bee Girl" ends, I don't know. If the CD is turned off after "Bee Girl," you lose a chance to hear one of the most beautiful songs I've ever heard. So pop some Ritalin if necesssary, and wait all the way till the six minute mark, when this masterpiece begins. Entitled "4-20-02", it is a song that Eddie recorded almost immediately upon hearing of the death of the late great Layne Staley from Alice In Chains. It is a gorgeous tribute. If you are a fan of Layne's music, then it is that much more meaningful, but the song is so melancholy and beautiful that it must stand out to anyone. Despite the presence of numerous other great songs (including Yellow Ledbetter), 4-20-02 is far and away the best.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best B-Side album in Rock History, hands down, January 11, 2004
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
It's almost baffling that this is a B-Side album. Songs that didn't fit on their studio albums, or songs that the band didn't like very much. Well, if you piece together 10-12 of these "B-Side" songs carefully, you could probably construct Pearl Jam's best album to date.
I didn't like the fact that they redid the vocals for some of the songs... personally, I liked the originals of "Driftin", "U", "Wash", and "Alone" much better. However, they're still good with the 2003 vocals dubbed over.
My personal favorite songs on the cd are, "Sad" (which amazingly was left off Binaural), "Hold On", "Otherside", "Down", "Fatal", and of course, the oldies but goodies "Footsteps", "Dirty Frank" (which was slightly altered), and "Yellow Ledbetter".
A must have for any Pearl Jam fan. You just won't find any B-Side album in Rock N' Roll history as good as this one. It's truly remarkable.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars one of my favorite pearl jam albums, October 29, 2005
By 
S. Bowman (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
This two-disc set is a great collection. As others have noted, the first disc is more lively and fast-paced, while the second is full of ballads and slow-paced songs. The first disc naturally captured my ear more quickly than the 2nd due to the stronger beats. While at first I found the 2nd one to be a bit on the dull side, it certainly has grown on me and now I think I enjoy it more than the 1st: it seems to have more "soul" to it and more skilled. Basically the two discs are a perfect ying-yang if you ask me.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lost Dogs from Seattle, January 18, 2004
By 
E. Callaway (Grand Rapids, MI USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Lost Dogs (Audio CD)
This collection has some of the greatest b-sides and rarities available. I had heard a great deal of it as I spent a fortune in the early 90's buying the European Maxi-singles that harbored many of the great b-sides. It surprises me that some of these songs never made it to any of the records themselves. . . Pearl Jam does not have notoriously long albums, so there is room for more, and much of this would have been worthy of being included.
In my opinion there really was not anything missing that I had heard and loved. (except "Crazy Mary" but I have it on a dozen of the "Official Bootlegs")
Highlights are many in this ragtag group of 30 tracks that span more than a decade's body of work. Staples like "Yellow Ledbetter" and "Footsteps"(which has been altered to include a harmonica, very nice!) are present and sound as good as they ever have. It is interesting that a great deal of the B-sides have aged a better than the records. The first two Pearl Jam records while classic, have a distinct "fuzzy grunge" style in their instrumentation. This makes them sound time specific as many artists of the time used similar effects. It is nice that some of said effects have been removed from the album tracks in the live performance and they no longer sound dated. The early B-sides are less "finished" than the albums were, so they lack some of the slight overproduction of the early albums.
The inclusion of some of the tracks from the annual fanclub Christmas singles was a great choice. I am really happy that I now have a copy of "Let Me Sleep (It's Christmas Time)" that doesn't sound like it was recorded in a tin can under water. Several others from the Christmas Singles include "Last Kiss," "Strangest Tribe," and "Drifting." All great songs. I was not all that impressed with the version of "wash" that was used. The one from the single was better, but it is always nice to hear something different. "Alone" was a solid version but again, different from the "Go" b-side.
I would have to say that "Fatal" is the gem of the records. It is one of the finest songs in Pearl Jam's history. Simple and melodic, it has an amazing amount of feeling. There are songs on Lost Dogs that I do not care all that much for, but there are so many that are great that I could not imagine giving this less than five stars. It is a definitive collection of Pearl Jam's unreleased material.
epc
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Lost Dogs
Lost Dogs by Pearl Jam (Audio CD - 2003)
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