Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lost Friendships: A Memoir of Truman Capote Tennessee Williams and Others Paperback – December 1, 1989


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$23.95 $3.95
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$46.00

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on the current pick, "The Mockingbird Next Door: Life with Harper Lee" by Marja Mills.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 270 pages
  • Publisher: Athena (December 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557782407
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557782403
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.9 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,093,473 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Drawing on his journals, novelist Windham ( Two People, etc.) describes his relationships with Capote and Williams ("the one person I loved to whom I didn't have a physical attachment"), their addiction to alcohol, jealousy and untruth, their deterioration as writers and as human beings. The inspiration for Capote's writing, he states, was not experience but reading, and as time went on, instead of writing, he "talked about the writing he was going to do." He was "always engaged in fantasy and web-spinning," and "his frail respect for the distinction between the truth and invention became even frailer." At a certain point, Williams, too, "ceased to be able to distinguish between truth and untruth." Like other recent books on these two unhappy writers, Windham's memoir is a depressing account of wasted lives and talents. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

A long-time friend of both Capote and Williams, Windham gives a compelling portrait of these two important American writers. Part 1, "Footnote to a Friendship," focuses on Capote. Part 2, "As if . . . ," depicts his more complex friendship with Williams (they collaborated on a play, You Touched Me , and he edited a volume of the playwright's letters). In telling their story, Windham spans four decades of literary life, bringing into his memoir other writers and luminariesGore Vidal, Isak Dinesen, and Andre Gide among them. This useful supplement to the standard biographies and criticism is recommended for collections specializing in modern literature. Michael J. Esposito, formerly with the Special Libs. Assn., Washington, D.C.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Twisted Bamboo on March 31, 2009
Format: Paperback
I thoroughly enjoyed this. It's filled with details that bring to life what it must have been like to be a (gay) man of letters from the 1940's to the 1980's (and Windham, at 90, is still kicking it in 2009).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Aram Saroyan on December 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
Windham is fascinated by his two literary friends who achieved a level of success that eludehd him and eludes most writers, Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams. He knew both so well that the reader sees both figures in the round--something that doesn't happen in conventional biographies of both figures. He also probes at the heart of how success can derail an artist's journey. This is a wonderful book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By W. Carter VINE VOICE on July 7, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Despite my admiration for both Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams, this book did them little justice. It appears to have been more for the author to talk about himself rather than trying to get into his subjects. I've read another book by Mr. Windham and did not find this to be problematic. The other issue I had with it is that as the book went on, the author started writing these long, convoluted sentences that he may have thought seemed Proustian but, in reality, made little sense--if not completely contradictory. I was not impressed.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 8 people found the following review helpful By C. L Wilson on January 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
I only read the half about Truman Capote. Windham really revealed more of himself than of Truman - seems to me to be the archtype of a gay man - too, too sensitive to remarks about himself, either verbal or in print. Actually uses the phrase "conspiracy against me". I think a very biased portrait of Capote.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?