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The Lost Gate (Mither Mages Book 1) [Kindle Edition]

Orson Scott Card
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (371 customer reviews)

Kindle Price: $8.99
Sold by: Macmillan
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Book Description

Danny North knew from early childhood that his family was different, and that he was different from them. While his cousins were learning how to create the things that commoners called fairies, ghosts, golems, trolls, werewolves, and other such miracles that were the heritage of the North family, Danny worried that he would never show a talent, never form an outself.

He grew up in the rambling old house, filled with dozens of cousins, and aunts and uncles, all ruled by his father. Their home was isolated in the mountains of western Virginia, far from town, far from schools, far from other people.

There are many secrets in the House, and many rules that Danny must follow. There is a secret library with only a few dozen books, and none of them in English -- but Danny and his cousins are expected to become fluent in the language of the books. While Danny's cousins are free to create magic whenever they like, they must never do it where outsiders might see.

Unfortunately, there are some secrets kept from Danny as well. And that will lead to disaster for the North family.


Books In This Series (2 Books)
Complete Series


  • Editorial Reviews

    From Publishers Weekly

    Card's newest series opener can't decide whether it's a thought experiment featuring a nifty magic system, a YA urban fantasy, or a series of fantasy interludes, so it settles for performing all three tasks satisfactorily, if not spectacularly. Danny North, descendant of exiled mages from another world, is taken aback when he comes into his true powers as a gatemage. He could reconnect his people with their long-lost home world, but gatemages are usually killed to maintain a fragile peace among the exiled clans. Fleeing his home, Danny finds refuge and slowly explores his potential, planning to open the first Great Gate in 14 centuries. Meanwhile, on the far-off world of Westil, a young gatemage named Wad finds love, conspiracies, and betrayal in a remote castle while struggling to recall his hazy past. Though occasionally uneven and meandering, this ambitious tale is well crafted, highly detailed, and pleasantly accessible. (Jan.)
    (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

    From Booklist

    Teenager Danny North has always suspected he was different from other members of his family, and you should know right off the bat that the members of Danny’s family are, or rather used to be, gods. Danny’s immediate relatives were formerly known as Odin, Thor, and Freya. For the past 14 centuries, ever since Loki closed the space-time gates that linked the planet Mittlegard (otherwise known as Earth) to far-off Westil, the once-powerful gods have existed as shadows of their former selves. But that could be about to change because Danny discovers that he possesses that rarest of gifts: he can create gates. Problem is, Danny’s family and the other families have a long-standing agreement that any “gatemage” will be killed immediately, to keep any one family from having the power to create gates and return to Westil (and regain its full powers). So Danny goes on the run, hiding among the drowthers (ordinary humans), but a mage as powerful as Danny can’t keep himself hidden for long, and soon he’s locked in battle with a powerful and dangerous opponent, with the fate of humanity at stake. Card has a lot on his plate, here: he’s creating not just a fictional world but also a mythology and an internally consistent magic system to go with it. But that’s the sort of thing he’s so very good at, and his legion of fans—especially devotees of his classic novel Ender’s Game, which also features a boy discovering his unique gifts—should enjoy this similar tale immensely. --David Pitt

    Product Details

    • File Size: 2458 KB
    • Print Length: 464 pages
    • Publisher: Tor Books; Reprint edition (January 4, 2011)
    • Sold by: Macmillan
    • Language: English
    • ASIN: B003OUXECO
    • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
    • X-Ray:
    • Word Wise: Enabled
    • Lending: Not Enabled
    • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,562 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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    Customer Reviews

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews
    116 of 125 people found the following review helpful
    Format:Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
    In truth, I am not an avid reader of fantasy material and my forays into sci-fi territory generally tend to run to the darker side, but I've been aware of Orson Scott Card's reputation in the genre for many years (I've ALMOST bought "Ender's Game" dozens of times). I do know that OSC has done quite a bit of work in the realm of mages and mysticism in recent years, so I eagerly jumped on "The Lost Gate" as it promised to be the first of an announced "Mithermages" series. With "The Lost Gate," OSC has created an enjoyable adventure and coming-of-age story appropriate to both the adult and the young adult marketplace. Filled with likable characters and mildly dangerous scenarios, "The Lost Gate" kept me fitfully entertained and pushing through the pages.

    "The Lost Gate" really tells two stories set in alternate worlds. The bulk of the book is devoted to Danny North who hails from a once powerful clan of mages living on a rural compound in contemporary America. Thought useless by most of the family, Danny soon starts to understand that he does have a power--the power of gatemaking. This is an outlawed resource, however, as the power to make gates (which grant you the ability to move almost anywhere in the simplest terms) can be exploited in the wrong hands. "The Lost Gate" presents a complicated history in which forces have eradicated ALL gatemakers and closed all existing gates. Danny is soon on the run as his ability starts to become apparent which leads him to others who seek to alternately help and/or harm him. In the parellel plane of Westil, we meet another young man with gating ability. His mysterious past keeps him aloof--but as an underling in the realm's royal workforce, he soon becomes entrenched in court politics and intrigue.
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    78 of 91 people found the following review helpful
    Format:Hardcover
    Danny is an almost orphaned child raised in a family of magical adepts, while he himself lacks the skills and talents that set his family apart from humanity. Instead, he focuses on his academic studies, absorbing history, languages, and learning at a voracious rate. One day, almost by accident, that all changes when he realizes he unexpectedly inherits magical powers long thought to be lost from the world. This discovery is a death sentence in his family, and he does the only logical thing--he runs, narrowly escaping certain death.

    On his journey, he explores his new and strange magical powers, as well as the non-magical world he has been hidden from his whole life. He is a mage, descendent of the gods and goddesses man worshiped in ancient times, but he travels among normal people, finding his way among the beggars and thieves in the underworld of Washington, D.C.

    Even as he does, he is hiding from his family, the descendents of gods. You see, the ancient pantheons in the Greek, Nordic, Roman, or Hindu world are really visitors to Earth, mages whose powers were amplified by their journey through magical gates between their world and Earth. Those gates were lost many centuries ago, stranding them here and weakening their powers. Now, Danny is about to find himself at the center of an ancient struggle to get back to their world, renew their powers, and regain control of the Earth as gods and goddesses. His very existence will reignite a power struggle between the modern descendents of the pantheons for the control of the gates, and he will be at the center of it.

    While not an entirely original story, it is clever and creative.
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    45 of 54 people found the following review helpful
    Format:Hardcover|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
    Orson Scott Card is one of those rare authors who is not only prolific but continues to write incredibly creative and fascinating science fiction and fantasy. His latest book, The Lost Gate, continues in this tradition. Card has done it again: he has created a whole new world and populated it with incredibly interesting characters. When you combine this with the fact that Card is a masterful story teller, it is no surprise that this book is a real page turner. This is definitely a stand-alone book, but is clearly the beginning of another successful fantasy series for Card.

    Card is at his best when he writes about children, and The Lost Gate is no exception. The Lost Gate is the story of a boy named Danny North. Danny grows up on a commune in rural Virginia where he and all of his family members are the descendants of Norse gods. But unlike his relatives, Danny doesn't seem to have any special, magical knack. In spite of being far more intelligent than his friends, Danny's ends up being the target of his peers derision and a disappointment to his parents. But just when you think that the book will turn into a sort of reverse Harry Potter, Card turns things around. Danny does have special powers--he is a gatemage, able to make tunnels across space and time. Because Danny has the potential to outstrip even the most powerful magicians in his community, Danny is now seen as a threat. Once Danny discovers that he is a gatemage,he is in a race against time; he must escape his community and learn how to use his powers to protect himself, before he is hunted down and killed by his own kind.

    Card is an expert at building up suspense while moving the story forward at a rapid pace.
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    Most Recent Customer Reviews
    5.0 out of 5 stars Cana not wait for book two!
    A different approach to Magic, the old gods, and what became of them set for the most part in our generic time. This creates more pressing questions than it answers. Read more
    Published 2 days ago by Beoceol
    5.0 out of 5 stars Orson Scott Card is one of my favorite authors and this story is up to...
    Orson Scott Card is one of my favorite authors and this story is up to par with Seventh son with I enjoyed. It is not that far behind Ender's Game. Read more
    Published 7 days ago by HECTOR VERA PEREZ
    4.0 out of 5 stars Ok
    This book was a decent read. I not sure if I like it or not. Some things in it just jump to fast. I will buy the next one and hope it will be better.
    Published 16 days ago by Scott Pantall
    4.0 out of 5 stars Worth a read
    An interesting and rather original concept. I hate finding spoilers in reviews so I will not go into the details of the story. Read more
    Published 16 days ago by Koenig888
    5.0 out of 5 stars Great book
    Every Card book is worth reading. One of the best authors living, if not all time. His depth of characterization if flawless, his stories good to great. Read more
    Published 18 days ago by clclark
    1.0 out of 5 stars What a disappointment
    Having enjoyed Ender's Game some twenty years ago, I imagined an Orson Scott Card story involving magicians would be entertaining and possibly ground-breaking. Read more
    Published 29 days ago by John Twohill
    5.0 out of 5 stars but intelligently woven into the fabric of something much larger
    One non-science fiction reading person I asked had heard of Card. NO sci-fi reader I have asked doesn't say "Oh yeah! Card? One of the greats". Read more
    Published 1 month ago by Sheepdog
    4.0 out of 5 stars Great Magic
    Good novel approach to magic that is quite engaging. It has a distinct character to it that is not the usual fantasy magic approach. Read more
    Published 1 month ago by Rico
    5.0 out of 5 stars Orson Scott Card never disappoints
    Wasn't quite sure what to expect with this. I read mixed reviews, but had to give it a shot. I had a hard time putting this one down. Read more
    Published 1 month ago by Scott
    1.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyed them. I prefer Sci-Fi Fantasy
    I never got past the first few chapters. I am an ad vide reader and will read any type of book. I have even read all of Orson Scott Cards woman of the bible books. Enjoyed them . Read more
    Published 2 months ago by Dave Tuggle
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    More About the Author

    Orson Scott Card is the bestselling author best known for the classic Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow and other novels in the Ender universe. Most recently, he was awarded the 2008 Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in Young Adult literature, from the American Library Association. Card has written sixty-one books, assorted plays, comics, and essays and newspaper columns. His work has won multiple awards, including back-to-back wins of the Hugo and the Nebula Awards-the only author to have done so in consecutive years. His titles have also landed on 'best of' lists and been adopted by cities, universities and libraries for reading programs. The Ender novels have inspired a Marvel Comics series, a forthcoming video game from Chair Entertainment, and pre-production on a film version. A highly anticipated The Authorized Ender Companion, written by Jake Black, is also forthcoming.Card offers writing workshops from time to time and occasionally teaches writing and literature at universities.Orson Scott Card currently lives with his family in Greensboro, NC.

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    Xanth?
    Writers often borrow from one another. Take, for instance, the books called "Beauty". One came out in 1992 and was reissued in 2005 and the other came out in 2005. Both with the same name, same premise, some of the same characters, but each very different stories.

    Beauty:... Read More
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