Customer Reviews


1,750 Reviews
5 star:
 (1,450)
4 star:
 (215)
3 star:
 (48)
2 star:
 (25)
1 star:
 (12)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


394 of 408 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The gods have gone silent...
When I first heard that Rick Riordan was setting another series in the same universe that he had created for Percy Jackson, I was both excited and a little wary. Excited because I had enjoyed that world and felt it had lots of potential for new adventures; wary because I feared the new series might not meet my expectations and that, if it didn't, it might somehow cast a...
Published on October 13, 2010 by Mary Kate

versus
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Conflicted....
This 2nd series doesn't look very promising.. The originality is there, yes, with the brilliant twist of Greek and Roman counterparts. The use of actual mythology as well. However, if you've read the Percy Jackson series, you must have been endeared with the masterful 1st-person point-of-view of Riordan. You could feel the weight of Percy's decisions while second guessing...
Published 9 months ago by Rocketem


‹ Previous | 1 2175 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

394 of 408 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The gods have gone silent..., October 13, 2010
By 
Mary Kate (Wisconsin, USA) - See all my reviews
When I first heard that Rick Riordan was setting another series in the same universe that he had created for Percy Jackson, I was both excited and a little wary. Excited because I had enjoyed that world and felt it had lots of potential for new adventures; wary because I feared the new series might not meet my expectations and that, if it didn't, it might somehow cast a pall over my affection for the Percy Jackson books. I need not have worried. The Lost Hero, the first book in that new series - the Heroes of Olympus - managed to meet all of my expectations and did so in a style that made me glad Riordan had gone ahead with the idea. While having read the Percy Jackson books is not a pre-requisite for enjoying The Lost Hero, I do think those who have done so will be able to immerse themselves in this world much more quickly and will enjoy the book more than those unfamiliar with Percy's story.

The Lost Hero introduces three new main characters - Jason, who has no memory of his life before page one of the story, Piper, a girl with "kaleidoscope eyes" (all together now - Lucy in the sky-yi with diamonds...) who has the gift of persuading people to give her things and Leo, whose clever and creative hands need to be always busy. As the story begins, the three are part of a group from a school for troubled kids on a field trip to the horseshoe shaped Skywalk that curves out over the Grand Canyon. Since the very existence of this Skywalk in real life kind of freaks me out (seriously, have you seen the pictures of it?), I wasn't particularly surprised when freaky occurrences ensued almost as soon as our new heroes stepped onto it.

Readers are pitched head-first into one of the first forays in a new battle the demi-gods will soon find themselves embroiled in. In short order we learn that the gods have gone silent and that Percy Jackson is missing. Jason, Piper and Leo are all having visions, dreams or reawakened memories, many of which revolve around Hera who, we discover, is being held prisoner. Along with a new Great Prophecy (Seven half-bloods shall answer the call/To storm or fire the world must fall/An oath to keep with a final breath/and foes bear arms to the Doors of Death), a new quest must be undertaken by the trio of newbies to find and free Hera.

I appreciate that Riordan continues to give us both strong female and ethnically diverse characters and that he seems able to hit many of the right notes in depicting teenage language, actions and emotions. For me, he has a knack for making his characters seem real and believable and, in The Lost Hero, he once again succeeds in making me care about them. My sympathy for and interest in the trio builds as details of their lives are revealed in the early chapters of the book (each chapter is told from either Jason, Piper or Leo's third person POV) and by the time they head off on their quest, I'm fully invested in seeing them through their adventures.

One of my favorite aspects of The Lost Hero is the inclusion of Roman mythology with the Greek that was the focus in the Percy Jackson series. I found the discussions of the subtle differences in the gods from one culture to the other really interesting and reading about them made me want to learn more about both.

Lastly, for those dying to know, Percy Jackson definitely plays a role in this series. How significant that role will be remains to be seen. Next up in the series is The Son of Neptune, due in the fall of 2011.

Highly recommended. Riordan has laid the groundwork here for another fun and exciting series and I'm already looking forward to the next book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


78 of 89 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Lost Hero: Riordan's Best Book Yet?, October 19, 2010
Rick Riordan's son told him that The Lost Hero, the first in the author's new Heroes of Olympus series, was his best book yet, even better than break-out sensation Percy Jackson and the Olympians. He was absolutely right. In May, I said The Red Pyramid, the first in new Egyptian series The Kane Chronicles was Riordan's best book yet. I loved the way he had come into his own as an author with a distinguished voice all his own. Unlike with PJ, you weren't comparing things to other popular series such as Harry Potter. This was a Rick Riordan book. It was HIM. I'll say the same thing about The Lost Hero. Riordan has really become a talented storyteller.

One thing I love about Riordan is the way he uses mythology, a genre that's always been dear to my heart. One thing that made The Kane Chronicles so fantastic was the fact that I learned so much about Egyptian mythology. I already knew a lot of the Greek mythology emphasized in PJ and it wasn't as detailed. With The Lost Hero, even though Riordan is delving into Greek mythology once more, he's taking the time to focus on little-known details and facts. There's a lot more information on the Romans, for example, as well as little-known gods and goddesses such as Khione, the goddess of snow.

The new book feels very tight and detailed. By the time the five-book series reaches its conclusion, there will be an epic tale for readers to return to. I like the way Riordan made the decision to split the book into the viewpoints of three different demigods, much as he did with The Kane Chronicles. It really allowed you to get into the head of everyone on the quest, not just one of the heroes. You could see the way they each struggled to come to terms with their new powers and immortal parents in their own way. I anticipate that every book will be this way as we are introduced to each of the seven demigods revealed in the Great Prophecy. I also feel that there's a good chance the next book will feature characters we haven't met yet and that the heroes we've encountered in this volume either won't appear at all, or not until the finale. If this proves to be the case, it will further solidify Riordan's merit as an extremely talented writer; breaking your characters up between volumes writers can make the writing process harder, as seen by struggles that have delayed authors such as George R. R. Martin from releasing material more frequently.

As with his other books, Riordan creates a fast, nail-biting pace from the get-go in his new series and introduces new characters for his readers to fall in love with. There's Jason, whose name brings back memories of one of the greatest heroes of old, Piper, who takes everyone by surprise by having such powerful gifts, especially given her parentage, and finally Leo, a son of Hephaestus with a wicked cool toolbelt and a penchant for fire-breathing dragons. We're also given updates regarding the new of what has become of our favorite heroes and heroines from the first Camp Half-Blood series. The nice thing about The Lost Hero is that you don't have to read the PJ series in order to get into this one. The two series complement one another and work together, but for a first-time reader, things will still make sense.

The series is designed to keep readers on their toes. If you're astute and know your mythology, you'll probably realize who the main villain is early on. Given enough clues, you'll probably realize the truth about Jason as well. There's also a good chance that you may figure out the truth revealed in the final chapter (and the reason Riordan wouldn't reveal the name of the next book at the live simulcast launch party on Tuesday). At the same time, you may be blown away with each new discovery. I tend to be one of those readers who reads too many books for her own good and learned how to read with a critical eye, which makes fooling me harder than most. At the same time, I still thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Some of my theories were very wrong and proven to be from almost the beginning, others developed as the novel progressed and I had an "Ah-ha!" moment, pleased with myself when my suspicions proved true. I was so involved in the novel and fate of all the characters. I wish I had the next book in my greedy little hands already. Scratch that. I wish I had the next two, if we don't get to see these characters again until book three.

If you liked Percy Jackson (or even disliked it due to its similarities to other novels, like some people I know) or enjoy mythology, this book is one of this fall's must-reads. My only hope for the rest of the series is that a closer eye is paid to the editing process. You could tell the book was rushed to press; I'm one of those annoying readers that can be pulled out of the moment when there's a word or comma where there shouldn't be (or something glaringly missing, too). These books are too good to let such neglect mar them and allow for criticism in the future.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


60 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Welcome Back!, October 13, 2010
By 
Tiko (small town, MN) - See all my reviews
First, I highly recommend reading the Percy Jackson books first (but don't bother with the movie -- it kinda sucked). It's not essential for understanding the story, but that way you're able to jump right in and enjoy.

Lost Hero takes place a few months after Last Olympian. Enter Jason, a boy with no memory, and his friends Piper and Leo. They make their way into Camp Half Blood, and are granted a quest to rescue a goddess. But this isn't simply a rehashing of Percy Jackson, for there are surprising complications, and of course, new monsters to face. We briefly get to see Annabeth, who is fiercely searching for Percy Jackson who is missing. And Rachel makes an appearance, and a prophecy or two. This was a fun read, with great characters, and just different enough that you don't feel like you're being told the same story as last time.

Fair warning: Lost Hero is the first in the series, so by reading this, you are setting yourself up for a long wait. This story wraps up one story arc, but throws out teasers of what's to come.

As an aside, I miss the awesome chapter titles from the Percy Jackson books.

These are also great books to listen to. Jesse Bernstein did a great job of narrating the Percy Jackson books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stay up all night!, December 29, 2010
A Kid's Review
So many kids have already discovered Rick Riordan, author of the Percy Jackson series and Kane Chronicles. He has created a new exciting book just as epic as his other books. It's called, Heroes of Olympus, Book 1, The Lost Hero. The book is about three demigods, Jason, Leo, and Piper, all age 16. Only, Jason has lost his memory. He doesn't remember who he is, where he came from, or anything from his past. All he knows is that he woke up one day on a bus with Piper holding his hand. In this book, Jason, Leo, and Piper must go on a quest to release a godess from her prison. What they didn't know is that there are greater forces, more powerful than any of them have ever faced, challenging them. Not only that, but Jason realizes that he is a danger to his friends, and may just bring the downfall of Oylmpus.

What kids love about this book is that it has humorous parts in it. Every page something exciting happens that pulls you to the next page and next page. You'll be up in your bed with a flashlight reading it. I especially love how the book takes you into Leo's dream, then he wakes up and he's plumetting down. I also thought it interesting how Rick Riordan takes you to a differnt kid's point of view every chapter, so you could hear everyone's point of view. Want to find out more, you'll have to read the book. I know you'll love it, because everyone I have suggested the book to has loved it. You will too, but make sure you read the other books first.

Sophie Lebowitz age 12
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Conflicted...., October 5, 2013
This review is from: The Lost Hero (Heroes of Olympus, Book 1) (Paperback)
This 2nd series doesn't look very promising.. The originality is there, yes, with the brilliant twist of Greek and Roman counterparts. The use of actual mythology as well. However, if you've read the Percy Jackson series, you must have been endeared with the masterful 1st-person point-of-view of Riordan. You could feel the weight of Percy's decisions while second guessing the other character's hidden thoughts. This Heroes of Olympus first book does NOTHING to get your mind thinking. It shifts from one point of view to another and this really lets out too too much information. Can't these information be discovered slowly? Cause it felt like a mass of indulgent information that tried too hard to draw readers in.

The romance factor. In the original series, love was present but not a blindingly obvious factor of the story. Sure you could SOMEWHAT assume Percy liked Annabeth. But you couldn't sure about anything. Like if Annabeth liked him more than a friend at all. This second series (I have read the second book) is nonstop about couples. I swear.. if I hear another 'oh they should just get together already,'...... I would like to think readers can figure out the romantic interests. It doesn't have to be pointed out. In the original series, it was teased. There were more important priorities than thinking about 'just get together already!' Like c'mon.... My girlfriend this, my boyfriend that. Yeah yeah we get it.

There was also an emphasis on appearances. Saying someone is 'good looking' or if that person is not good looking, then he or she is a redeeming 'cute' like a teddy bear. DOES EVERYONE HAVE TO BE GOOD LOOKING?

The wonderful Riordan sarcasm was missing as well. It appeared faintly in Leo but the 3rd person POV really eliminated the closeness we felt with Percy when he was directing the story. Sure we see more sides of the story, but in turn, a reader really does feel distant from the plot and characters.

If you bothered to read this, Thank you. I'm not a writer and this is just an opinion. I can go on and on about my dissatisfaction... but I'm fervently hoping Riordan somehow switches back to 1st person POV, gives Jason some character flaws, and ends all this couple talk. I mean who didn't love the start of Percy and Annabeth's relationship in the Last Olympian? I did. But they earned it. There was no hints that they would actually get together. This series is all about the obvious.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Continuation of Camp Half Blood Story!, December 6, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
People who liked the Percy Jackson books will love this first installment of the new companion series. It follows three new heroes and is set in the same world as Percy Jackson, a couple of years later. Riordan makes a switch from the first person view of Percy to a third person rotating POV featuring the three new heroes: Jason, Piper, and Leo. I really liked this switch. It worked great with the new characters and made them feel equally important to the story. There are also cameos by some favorite PJ characters which I thoroughly enjoyed. The story in this one was pretty cool, but it is clear by the end that the follow-ups will be pretty epic, and now I can't wait to get my hands on them.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Start for the Series, November 30, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book starts a new series of tales about the Ancient Greek Gods and their modern half-blood children. This series continues the story where the Percy Jackson series ended, and many of the same characters are in it, but so are some new ones. The main addition, Jason, will apparently be the lead character for this series. He enters this story with no memory and much of the book has him trying to figure out who he is. Jason, along with the other new additions Piper and Leo are introduced and developed in this book as they go on a quest to free a trapped goddess. As with the Percy Jackson books, this one is full of non-stop action and includes plenty of set-up for the additional books to come.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Riordan does it again!!!!, October 18, 2010
Let me start by saying I LOVE Rick Riordan's books, and I'm not in middle school OR high school. Suffice it to say I bought the Percy Jackson & the Olympians series to read to my son (5 yrs) & I loved the books! I read pretty fast so I constantly found myself having to read passages twice, once just to myself & again to my son (he loved them too).

I was sad when I closed the cover on "The Last Olympian", overjoyed when I saw he had written "The Kane Chronicles" (which is great as well) & truly thrilled when I saw he was working on "The Lost Hero".
I finished "The Lost Hero" today & my biggest complaint is that I have to wait until 2011 to find out what happens after the "cliffhanger" ending. For those who loved Percy & others at Camp Half-Blood, this series will not disappoint!!

Riordan introduces 3 new (and very likeable) characters: Jason, Leo & Piper. It's really quite cool how he puts it together with new heroes but still completing the picture with some old favorite's. I'll say no more as I don't want to spoil it if you haven't read this book. The new volume would be okay as a stand-alone book but the imagery will be more vivid & easy to follow for readers of the previous Percy series.

If you liked the world he created for Percy, you will love this! And for those who haven't read Percy, do it now! Young and old, this series is wonderful! My only complaint about anything Percy is that the movie was done so poorly, I'd love to see it play out on the big screen a la' Harry potter, but that wasn't Riordans fault. Damn Hollywood bigwigs!

Also, why aren't Riordans books required reading in schools? The man is a genius & while yes the books may be long they are a thousand times better than some titles I've seen listed for children. Keep up the great work Mr. Riordan! I will be one of the huddling masses clamoring to get a copy of book 2 in 2011!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "And then they will awaken...", October 13, 2010
Rick Riordan has not ceased to amaze me. Ever since I picked up a copy of THE LIGHTNING THIEF in 2008 and read the PERCY JACKSON AND THE OLYMPIANS straight through, I have loved everything Riordan has put out. From his Egyptian offshoot, THE KANE CHRONICLES, to even his entry in THE 39 CLUES, THE MAZE OF BONES, I am always shocked and in awe of his story-telling. And the first outing in the new HEROES OF OLYMPUS series, THE LOST HERO, is no exception.

I debated for quite a while as I read THE LOST HERO whether a new-comer to Riordan could pick up this book and just start in, and I came to the conclusion that if someone hasn't read anything by him, it would be best to go back to THE LIGHTNING THIEF and start there. Otherwise, THE LOST HERO would contain too many references to events and characters which wouldn't make sense to someone who hasn't read the books yet. So if you haven't finished Riordan's first series, PERCY JACKSON AND THE OLYMPIANS, I would say stop reading this review now and go back to THE LIGHTNING THIEF.

The story begins with a boy named Jason, who suddenly appears in a school bus in the middle of the desert sitting beside Piper and Leo, two classmates that he's supposedly been friends with for the past few months at Wilderness School. But Jason can't remember any of that. In fact, he can't even remember his own name or how he got there. I really don't want to say much more than that, because diving too deeply into the storyline will only ruin the experience.

Per usual, the story is action-packed, and coming in at a hefty 576 pages, THE LOST HERO, starts and doesn't slow down until the very last page. As I read, I couldn't help myself from gasping out loud. There was a new plot twist to almost every page I turned. At first, I kept wondering what on earth can Riordan do with the whole concept of Greek gods and mythology that he didn't accomplish in the first five books - and I will admit part of me was a bit afraid that THE LOST HERO was going to fizzle out and not live up to my favorite, THE LAST OLYMPIAN. But Riordan pulls out some unexpected ideas that meld seamlessly with the mythology he's crafted throughout the first series.

The book is told in third-person, which is a bit of a switch from either THE KANE CHRONICLES or PERCY JACKSON AND THE OLYMPIANS, which were both written first-person. THE LOST HERO switches off between Jason, Piper, and Leo, each getting two chapters and then switching to the next. This aids in the character development, which is stronger here than in other novels from Riordan. The things that Piper and especially Leo grow through in the book felt real and done in a way that made sense with the story. The author searched out a lot of the issues that face students today, including abandonment in its various forms. In a way, I think THE LOST HERO is one of his more serious books, and while there was definitely humor to lighten things up here and there, this one definitely came across as a much weightier story, for the characters and the plot.

While the story does center around Jason, Piper, and Leo, there are plenty of familiar faces around to tie things back to the first series. Cameos from people such as Chiron, Clarisse, Annabeth and others definitely were fun and added an interesting dimension to the storyline. Riordan also mines some lesser known myths in the Greek works and gives us some exciting battles with old foes that are just as deadly as anything Percy, Grover, and Annabeth faced - and sometimes, much, much worse.

THE LOST HERO ends up rising above and beyond anything I expected from Riordan, and will definitely get readers excited to revisit Camp Half-Blood and its demigods. And now, we only have to wait until Fall of 2011 for the next volume, THE SON OF NEPTUNE.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent book, December 9, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This book was excellent. It really kept you interested, it makes me wish the next book was already out. I've read my share of literature both classic and modern. In the modern catigory this one definately is a top contender. It is an easy read because it is targeted for a younger audience but still, excellent. I have to admit though I should have seen the ending coming -- it's so easy to forget details in that book that it isn't even funny. I really enjoy the humor that is mixed into the book as well. I would rate it right along side his first series.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2175 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The Lost Hero (Heroes of Olympus, Book 1)
The Lost Hero (Heroes of Olympus, Book 1) by Rick Riordan (Paperback - April 3, 2012)
$9.99 $8.06
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.