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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fresh in-yer-face bluegrass in a traditional vein, May 7, 2002
This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
Jim Lauderdale is a prolific songwriter in contemporary country music who has penned many hits for artists like Vince Gill, Patty Loveless, Mark Chesnutt, Kathy Mattea, and George Strait. He also has several recordings of his own and has appeared on the Grand Ol' Opry. A North Carolina native and son of a minister/choir director, Lauderdale also has extensive bluegrass roots. When he arrived in Nashville in the late 1970s, he had hoped to pursue a bluegrass career. Instead, he moved into mainstream country. However, Lauderdale has always considered Stanley as "the Mount Rushmore of music," and his love for bluegrass became apparent when he featured Ralph and the Clinch Mountain Boys on his 1997 album, "Whisper." Later, Lauderdale was a guest on Stanley's "Clinch Mountain Country" project, and he in now an honorary Clinch Mountain Boy. Building on the chemistry between these two artists, they collaborated on an album of their own, the Grammy-nominated and highly recommended "I Feel Like Singing Today," (on the Rebel label).
Of the 14 tracks on this latest album, 13 were written or co-written by Lauderdale. Every single piece is a winner that clearly shows that fresh, new bluegrass can be composed today that reflects the power, sentiments and emotions of traditional music. Songs like "Redbird" could have just as easily been written 100 years ago. For six songs, Lauderdale's songwriting collaborators include Candace Randolph, Shawn Camp, and Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter. Some of the songs like Randolph's and Lauderdale's "Quit That" and "I Think Somebody Better Come Back Home" have a Jimmy Martin-like feel that could help make these songs bluegrass standards. Lauderdale's songs and lonesome singing are filled with the typical themes of mountain music: love gone wrong, sorrow, nostalgia for home, and redemption. The band even presents a playful novelty number called "She's Looking At Me." The album's sound quality is excellent with in-your-face singing and picking. From the first notes on, Jim's lead vocals, Ralph's tenor, and the banjo-picking exclaim, "This is hard-driving bluegrass!" This is another landmark album for Lauderdale and Stanley, and if you like fresh bluegrass in a traditional vein, this album will hit the right spot. Lauderdale has found his place, and that is helping new traditional country music and bluegrass to endure. I'm giving a "double five" to Jim and Ralph and the Boys for this latest effort.
--Joe Ross, moderator/reviewer for Nwbluegrass
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a great CD. Wonderful bluegrass music., July 6, 2002
By 
Myra Hill "pigeon lover" (New York City, United States of America) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
As a New Yorker, I used to be only a casual bluegrass music listener. When I heard bluegrass music, the Beverly Hillbillies television series always came to my mind. That was until I met a devoted online friend who lives in the Appalachian Mountains in Virginia, I paid more attention to bluegrass and wanted to learn more about the music. Because I was overwhelmed and undecided on which bluegrass CDs to buy while browsing at a record store, I tried out a couple of bluegrass CDs at listening posts. Then I came across Lost In The Lonesome Pines - Jim Lauderdale/Ralph Stanley. I couldn't help but standing at the post and listening to the CD over and over again. I was so blown away that I was convinced to buy the CD even though I was short of cash. This is one great CD. More New Yorkers should get into bluegrass which is the American icon.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can't Stop, August 3, 2002
This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
I cannot stop playing this CD. It's that good. Uplifting music for a sunny Saturday morning, or anytime really. The tunes are instantly sing-a-long-able.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars + 1/2 stars...Even Better Than the First Collaboration, February 28, 2004
This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
On his second collaboration with Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain Boys (the first was 1999's equally excelent I FEEL LIKE SINGING TODAY), Jim Lauderdale has bested himself. Not only is the playing as stellar as on the earlier effort, but Lauderdale's compositions are even stronger this time out. Chalk it up to experience or confidence (or both), but this is a terrific bluegrass album. This time out all but one of the songs were written or co-written by Lauderdale. The lone exception is the Bill Monroe-penned "Boat of Love."
Once again Lauderdale teams up with Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter on two songs, the bouncy "Deep Well of Sadness" and the mournful "Oh Soul!" Personal favorites include "Quit That," "Redbird," and the comical "She's Looking At Me." The album closes with the a capella "Listen To the Shepherd," a gospel number with Ralph Stanley's haunting lead vocals.
This is one of the finest bluegrass albums released in recent years. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love this CD, July 1, 2002
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This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
I'm no expert on bluegrass, folk, or country music. I'm also not necessarily tapping into the post "O Brother" movement. However this album caught my eye and after listening to a sample, I was hooked. I've listened to it straight through three times since I got it yesterday. So even though I do not have the knowledge base of these other reviewers, just for pure pleasure, get this one.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lauderdale, what a Guy!!!, June 28, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
This is a fantasic CD, I listened to the CD first and was amazed that every song was excellent. Then I read the flyer and saw that not only did Jim Lauderdale sing in almost all the songs but he was a song writer in 13 of the 14 songs!! Talk about talent in being able to write winner after winner and even have the voice to sing them! If that was not enough, you get Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain Boys!!! This is a must-have CD for any bluegrass fan. Oh, the song Lauderdale didn't write was Boat of Love...written by Bill Monroe!!!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars solid, soulful stuff, June 27, 2002
By 
Jerome Clark (Canby, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
Those who complain, foolishly in my opinion, that Ralph Stanley has strayed from the bluegrass straight-and-narrow in his new Columbia CD should get their fix from this splendid, hard-driving disc. This is not, of course, a Stanley recording as such; Jim Lauderdale does almost all of the lead singing, and all but one of the songs are his writes or cowrites. But that's Dr. Stanley in the harmony vocals, and it's his banjo and his band, fashioning a pure, classic bluegrass sound. Lauderdale's songs draw on all of traditional bluegrass' bases -- Appalachian folk music, early country, gospel, first-generation artists such as Flatt & Scruggs and Jimmy Martin -- without ever coming across as merely imitative. Lost in the Lonesome Pines defines the adjective "solid" in a bluegrass context, which means there's plenty of "soulful," too.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Nice, August 16, 2003
By 
This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
It usually takes several listens for me to get into new music. This CD sounded great the first time. It is actually better than their first collaboration (which was nominated for a Grammy).
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4.0 out of 5 stars Very Nice Album, July 30, 2010
By 
Christopher Pike "chrispy50" (Pt. Reyes Station, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
I love the musical family tree, the way musicians are connected ala The six degrees of Kevin Bacon. Here, Jim Lauderdale, who really gets around and everyone seems to like, is playing with the venerable Ralph Stanley, yet some of the songs are co-written with Robert Hunter, who wrote some of the best Grateful Dead songs with Jerry Garcia!
The songs are all current except for one by Bill Monroe, but they all sound authentic, like they rose from the deep roots of Appalachia. They have a great spiritual feeling as well as a good sense of humor. Really nice playing and singing! I can't quite give it five stars, but it's a strong four.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loving the Lonesome Pines, September 13, 2003
By 
Mina F. Rempe (Frederick, Maryland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Lost in the Lonesome Pines (Audio CD)
I am a fairly new fan of bluegrass--but I did get into it several years before the "O Brother Where Art Thou" craze so thankfully I can't be grouped in with the SUV driving yuppie newbies who have just discovered it is cool. I love the fact bluegrass is now getting the recognition it deserves, and this album is so good--it's beyond words. The title song is the best on the album--so hauntingly beautiful. Ralph Stanley's voice brings me to tears. This is a great album for anyone's bluegrass collection.
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Lost in the Lonesome Pines
Lost in the Lonesome Pines by Jim Lauderdale (Audio CD - 2002)
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