Buy New
$39.70
Qty:1
  • List Price: $49.95
  • Save: $10.25 (21%)
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $1.69
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lost Maritime Cultures: China and the Pacific Hardcover – March 31, 2007


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$39.70
$39.70 $71.39

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 219 pages
  • Publisher: Bishop Museum Press (March 31, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 158178063X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1581780635
  • Product Dimensions: 12.4 x 9.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,214,758 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Judith Goldsmith on June 11, 2008
Format: Hardcover
[...]

Archaeologists Find Evidence of Origin of Pacific Islanders
By Heidi Chang / Honolulu, Hawaii / 31 March 2008

The origin of Pacific Islanders has been a mystery for years. Now archaeologists believe they have the answer. As Heidi Chang reports, they found it in China.

The excavation of the Zishan site (Zhejiang Province) in 1996, where many artifacts from the Hemudu culture have been found China had a sea-faring civilization as long as 7000 years ago. Archaeologist Tianlong Jiao says, one day, these mariners sailed their canoes into the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, and stayed. He points out, "Most scientists, archaeologists, historical linguists and human biologists agree that today's southeast China, Taiwan and Northern Philippines, the whole region is the ultimate homeland of the Austronesian people." The Austronesians include today's Polynesian, Micronesian, Melanesian, and the indigenous people in Philippines, in the Southeast Asia archipelago, and in Taiwan.

Jiao, who was born in China, is chair of the Department of Anthropology at the Bishop Museum in Hawaii. He says understanding how seafaring technology developed in prehistoric China 3000 to 7000 years ago is critical in understanding the origins of Pacific heritage. "These people did not have a writing system, so they didn't record their own history, they had an oral history, but over many thousand years, the oral history is easily lost."

To prevent this history from being lost, Jiao has been coordinating the first joint research project with archaeologists from China, Taiwan and the United States. They are documenting evidence of the ancient seafaring civilizations that once flourished in southeast China.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
The book is a pictorial catalog of cultural artifacts found on the southeast China littoral which some interpret as ancestral to later Polynesian cultural development. The description and pictures of the archaeological finds are excellent, but the links to later Austronesian developments are a little thin, it seems to me. Would like to have seen more development of this theme.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images