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Lost Masters: Sages of Ancient Greece Kindle Edition

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Length: 235 pages

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Linda Johnsen is a leading author in the field of Eastern spirituality. She has a master's degree in Eastern studies and philosophy. She is the author of numerous boooks including Daughters of the Goddess: The Women Saints of India, Meditation is Boring?, and A Thousand Suns: Designing Your Future with Vedic Astrology.

Product Details

  • File Size: 421 KB
  • Print Length: 235 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0893892602
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Himalayan Institute Press (September 17, 2009)
  • Publication Date: September 17, 2009
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002PK14OY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #655,492 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Linda Johnsen is a long-time student of religious philosophy and spirituality and an initiate in the Shaktavaita Tradition. She holds degrees in Eastern and Western Psychology, and has post-graduate training in theology and Sanskrit. She has traveled to India and lived with women saints. She is a writer for several spiritual magazines and a contributor to several anthologies, including The Divine Mosaic: Women's Images of the Sacred Other. Linda is also author of Yes Publishers' Kirtan: Chanting as a Spiritual Path, A Thousand Suns: Designing your Future with Vedic Astrology, Daughters of the Goddess: Women Saints of India, which received Midwest Business Association award for "Best New Age Book of the Year" and The Living Goddess: Reclaiming the Tradition of the Mother of the Universe.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Curtis Steinmetz on December 1, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Linda Johnsen's book on "Greek Sages" is almost too good to be true. There are, in fact, lot's of good books to read about Greek philosophy that more or less accurately convey its spiritual content - but most of those books are fairly or even extremely demanding of the reader. Three good examples of what I'm talking about are Pierre Hadot's "What is Ancient Philosophy?", Robert Lamberton's "Homer the Theologian" and Gregory Shaw's "Theury and the Soul." Those just aren't books that I can recommend to most of my friends - not because my friends are stupid, but because to tackle those books you have to already have a pretty high level of interest and motivation - which most people don't have when it comes to the "boring" topic of Greek philosophy. But Johnsen has a Goddess-given gift for not only communicating her infectious enthusiasm, but also for making things as simple as possible - but no simpler (as Einstein advised).

Reading "Lost Masters" is like "taking the red pill" in the Matrix - the veil isn't just lifted - it is rent in two and you see what was there all along, but which had been invisible before. The artificial barrier between "East" and "West" dissolves and you realize that the great wisdom of the Pagan sages could never be extinguished, because it's origin was Divine.

You see, the great Sages of both Greece and India were both in touch with the same Divine source of Wisdom. And not only that, but there certainly were direct human contacts between "East" and "West".
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By tepi on April 17, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
'Lost Masters' is a popular and not altogether reliable treatment of a fascinating but complex subject. If, however, it leads you to Plotinus your time will not have been entirely wasted.

Those who may prefer a somewhat more objective and thoroughly documented scholarly account of the relations between Early Greek and Indian thought might find their needs better served by Thomas McEvilley's recent and more comprehensive study, details of which are as follows:

Thomas McEvilley, 'The Shape of Ancient Thought: Comparative Studies in Greek and Indian Philosophies.' New York: Allworth Press, 2002. ISBN 1581152035. Hardback, 731 pp. Illustrated with b/w plates, maps, and with a detailed bibliography and index.

The Shape of Ancient Thought: Comparative Studies in Greek and Indian Philosophies

And for more on Plotinus see my Listmania List: 'Why not let Plotinus guide you Home?
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By L. Brownell on August 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
I initially picked up the book because I was curious about the relationship between western and eastern cultures and practices. Other books I've read on the great Greek thinkers such as Plato stopped when it came to spirituality. The author did a nice job of presenting the material. This was one of the best books I've read this year.
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Many years ago I bought a used book that included the surviving texts of Epicurus, Epictetus, Plotinus, and Marcus Aurelius. Having long been interested in Indian philosophy, I was constantly struck by the similarity between these thinkers and Indian/Yogic ideas (including Advaita Vedanta). Later I read Peter Kingsley's books about Parmenides and Empedocles and was again struck by the connections between these men and the study of consciousness (India).

"Lost Masters" is an excellent introduction to the holistic, practical philosophies of the ancient Greek and Mediterranean world, and how well they integrate with ancient Indian thought. I call these philosophies practical because they addressed how man might best live his life so as to achieve wisdom and peace.

Like she says in her introduction, Greek philosophy is often presented in very boring ways. Partly this is because such a small subset of the Greek books survived to our times. Also, Christianity (not any Jesus but the Roman church started by Constantine) led to the dumbing down of Europe and the Dark Age prohibition of philosophical investigation. Even the Renaissance took place in a Christian political culture that eschewed or punished truly open philosophical discourse.

Though we grew up with the world view that most sophisticated human studies were pretty recent, common sense, the reading ancient Greek and Indian texts, and continuing archeological discoveries (Gobekle Tepe, etc.) indicate that serious human knowledge of many sorts is probably extremely ancient, and that various cataclysmic events probably wiped out entire cultures. There is also increasing evidence that the ancients traded ideas as well as goods over vast distances.

"Modern" culture is temporally provincial.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gary McS on October 8, 2007
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This book is a treasure and contains a fresh approach to the sages of Greece. I am using the book as an aid in my middle school classroom - really quite fascinating and well-written.
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