Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $1.50 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 11 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Lost Message of Jesus has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Orion LLC
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Some visible wear, and minimal interior marks. Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Lost Message of Jesus Paperback – March 3, 2004


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.49
$1.48 $0.01
$13.49 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 11 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Lost Message of Jesus + Pierced for Our Transgressions: Rediscovering the Glory of Penal Substitution
Price for both: $30.61

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan (March 3, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310248825
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310248828
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.4 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #691,263 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Chalke, a British social activist, broadcaster and author of The Parenttalk Guide to Your Child and Sex and Faithworks, asserts that churches neglect Christ's basic message that "the Kingdom... is available now to everyone through me." Instead, Chalke says, pieces of Christ's message have been overemphasized and distorted. Like a refinisher removing lacquer from antique furniture, Chalke seeks to strip falsity and tradition from the gospel by examining the accounts of Christ's life in their original context. Clear explanations and plenty of anecdotes reveal truths that get little air time in most pulpits. For example, Jesus offered forgiveness outside the temple. In doing so, he brought hope to people the Pharisees had shut out of the temple—and threatened the nation's power structure. Such insights illustrate the immediacy of Christ's message; Chalke says Jesus offered forgiveness " 'right here, right now' and for free." But just as the furniture refinisher risks damaging the original while restoring its beauty, Chalke scrapes the outer boundaries of Christian orthodoxy with questionable treatment of the traditional Western notion of original sin (he cites no scripture in saying Christ emphasized humanity's "original goodness") and of the atonement. Chalke appears to reject the idea that Jesus' death was a sacrifice for sin, maintaining instead that the crucifixion destroyed "the ideology that violence is the ultimate solution." The book's intent—to free the gospel from religious bias and expose its unvarnished power—deserves kudos, but some traditional Christians may greet the specifics with skepticism.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Chalke, a British social activist, broadcaster and author of The Parenttalk Guide to Your Child and Sex and Faithworks , asserts that churches neglect Christ's basic message that 'the Kingdom... is available now to everyone through me.' Instead, Chalke says, pieces of Christ's message have been overemphasized and distorted. Like a refinisher removing lacquer from antique furniture, Chalke seeks to strip falsity and tradition from the gospel by examining the accounts of Christ's life in their original context. Clear explanations and plenty of anecdotes reveal truths that get little air time in most pulpits. For example, Jesus offered forgiveness outside the temple. In doing so, he brought hope to people the Pharisees had shut out of the temple---and threatened the nation's power structure. Such insights illustrate the immediacy of Christ's message; Chalke says Jesus offered forgiveness ' 'right here, right now' and for free.' But just as the furniture refinisher risks damaging the original while restoring its beauty, Chalke scrapes the outer boundaries of Christian orthodoxy with questionable treatment of the traditional Western notion of original sin (he cites no scripture in saying Christ emphasized humanity's 'original goodness') and of the atonement. Chalke appears to reject the idea that Jesus' death was a sacrifice for sin, maintaining instead that the crucifixion destroyed 'the ideology that violence is the ultimate solution.' The book's intent---to free the gospel from religious bias and expose its unvarnished power---deserves kudos, but some traditional Christians may greet the specifics with skepticism. (May) -- Publisher’s Weekly

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Ben Kickert on January 3, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Lost Message of Jesus (TLMOJ) was assigned as a text for a seminary course I am taking on "Kingdom, Church and World."

This book earns a rating of 4 stars because of its straightforward content and overall approachability. Throughout the book Chalke focuses on the biblical concept of the Kingdom of God, which is the dominant message in the life and teaching of Jesus. In doing so, as other reviewers have noted, the tone of the text emphasizes action, love and justice. Readers who might find this book to be "liberal" are probably approaching the TLMOJ from a different angle than the author and this may result in some discomfort. Chalke focuses on Jesus and the message he brings as is recorded in the Gospels. This message is comprised of his words, but perhaps more importantly his actions. Readers looking for the sinner's prayer or emphasis on personal salvation wont find it in TLMOJ because this idea is largely absent from the Gospels. I can't help but think that most of the objections raised by this book will largely be prompted by an American Evangelical reading of the Bible, rather than an honest assessment of Jesus as he lived and taught in the first century world.

As I read the book I kept thinking to myself "I have heard this before" and in most cases I had. A reader searching for a wealth of "original" material in TLMOJ may be disappointed as most of the content and ideas can be found more fleshed out in other sources; the influence of NT Wright is especially noticeable. That being said, the strength of the book is not its originality, rather it is its presentation. Chalke does a marvelous job of presenting a holistic understanding of the Kingdom of God in a book that is easy to read and easy to recommend.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Myers - Writing at TillHeComes on November 7, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you have never read anything by NT Wright, this book would be a good introduction to themes and ideas that are commonly found in his writings. You could almost call this a Layman's Guide to NT Wright and the central message of Jesus and the Gospels.

NT Wright has shown us the importance of love and forgiveness in the message of Jesus, and Chalke and Mann summarize that message here by looking at some of the key texts and themes in the Gospels.

Since I have read a lot of NT Wright, and prefer writing that is a little more academic and detail-oriented, I found this book to be a little repetitive and basic. Also, although the authors frequently made good points and referenced some good book, there were no footnotes to be found anywhere. If I wanted to follow up on something they cited, there was no way to do so.

So if you haven't read much of NT Wright, but are curious about what he says, this might be a good book for you.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Darren Cronshaw on March 31, 2010
Format: Paperback
Steve Chalke and Alan Mann, The Lost Message of Jesus (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2003)

This was a controversial book when it came out in the UK. It is a fresh exploration of the radical, life-changing, world-shaping message Jesus brought. Putting aside our cultural lenses, the writers follow N T Wright in inviting us to see Jesus through first-century eyes to see the revolutionary power of the gospel. `What Would Jesus Do' paraphernalia is popular today, but useless without a grasp of how Jesus acted and related. His cultural vandalism, boundary-crossing and party-going nature undermines a lot of legalistic Christian practice today. Chalke and Mann question starting evangelism with a focus on sin; an important doctrine but not as important nor as inviting as God's unconditional love and his plan and destiny for people. And they critique a narrow gospel that saves people for heaven instead of inviting them also to live for the Kingdom now. Instead of `don't do this and that' or `repent and go to heaven' they suggest starting with `if you could know what God is doing and be part of it, would you want to?' They comment: `The world is full of people who have been told, time and again by the Church, what not to do. What they long to hear about is what God wants them to do. People are desperate for a message that they can buy into, that they can see will make a difference to them and to the world in which they live' (p.117).

Originally reviewed in Darren Cronshaw `The Emerging Church: Spirituality and Worship Reading Guide.' Zadok Papers S159 (Autumn 2008).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If I won the lottery tomorrow and came into a large fortune I would purchase 7,000,000,000 copies of this book and disseminate them to every person on this planet. That's how good it is. That is how important the message is. This is the clearest, most beautiful explication of the Good News that I have ever read. It is truly, truly Good News, for everyone, and unfortunately the Church historic has not presented it in all of its splendor. This book may convince 'unbelievers' to come to Christ, but in addition it may also 'win the won' - those already in the camp may find a Jesus of a dimension they've never before appreciated, and a Heavenly Father who is far from the angry, judgmental caricature presented in pop memes, a Father who is so utterly winsome and lovable that hearts and minds will be revolutionized by the knowledge. Buy this book. Read it and weep for joy!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews