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The 'Lost' Second Book of Nicoletto Giganti(1608): A Rapier Fencing Treatise Paperback – October 28, 2013


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The 'Lost' Second Book of Nicoletto Giganti(1608): A Rapier Fencing Treatise + Nicoletto Giganti's The School of the Sword: A New Translation by Aaron Taylor M + The Art of the Two-Handed Sword
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 170 pages
  • Publisher: Vulpes; First edition (October 28, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1909348317
  • ISBN-13: 978-1909348318
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 0.4 x 6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #478,615 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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If you're a rapier fencer, click and purchase.
Pen-and- sword
In the first book Giganti noted in brief how to handle such an opponent, in the second he goes into much more detail.
Richard P. Marsden
The best piece of advice I can give you for this book is to start at the back.
IuchiAtesoro

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Richard P. Marsden on November 21, 2013
Format: Paperback
In a word- Wow! Out of all the rapier manuals, I always found Giganti the easiest to understand, the simplest in form, and the easiest to teach. In his first book he makes reference to the second, and I always assumed it was either never written or was a lost text.

Not so!

Piermarco Termineiello and Joshua Pendragon have brought to life, Giganti's second book. With the help of Vulpes, a division of Fox Spirit press- the book is lost no longer!

Ten pages in and we get some outright advice and contextual clues to the times, written in the clear and easy to understand style of Giganti.

First - He noted that in the first book he taught the basics- but what happens when you fight an inexperienced opponent? Giganti goes so far as to say that most have little skill with the sword and people need to train for that. In the first book Giganti noted in brief how to handle such an opponent, in the second he goes into much more detail.

Second - He mentions to parry not just with the forte but the edge of it. A hotly debated issue, it's nice to have an explicit instruction.

Third - Cutting! The rapier is primarily a thrusting weapon, but Giganti goes into some detail as to why cuts are to be expected, how they are countered and how they are used.

Throw in mixed weapons, dagger-plays, advice about armored or multiple opponents, and Giganti's second book is a great addition to any Historical European Martial Artist's library.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By IuchiAtesoro on November 21, 2013
Format: Paperback
This is an unusual book for me to review. I’ve spent a total of about eight hours fencing in my entire life. I have however dabbled in various martial arts for the best part of two decades (reading this has made my palms start to itch). It should be clear that I know next to nothing about the specifics of European sword play. I have done a bit of Japanese sword work and one thing is clear. The body moves in certain ways and across the world different systems used similar theories to take advantage of the inherent weaknesses of various attacks. This treatise is useful regardless of the art you study as it seems very precise and practical (much more than I’d expected).

The best piece of advice I can give you for this book is to start at the back. The glossary is an essential first read. You may well know what a mandritti is but it never hurts to step back and start from the basics. Make sure you understand the terms as they apply to this work. For instance the word measure. You have probably heard the phrase getting the measure of somebody. That is an old fencing term. The distance or spacing between combatants is an essential part of determining what your opponent’s level of knowledge and style of fighting is likely to be. Pay attention to it. Giganti shows has practical side several times by urging people to fight people of different styles as well as those with none. You can defend what you know a lot better than that which you can’t. Bloody sensible advice if you ask me. This is the kind of usable advice that is often missing from even modern writing on fighting arts.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I found it worthwhile after reading Giganti's first book. The translation was fine. My only issue was it format - I prefer format of the translation of Giganti's first book by Tom Leoni - in Leoni's book, the relevant plates were on the same page as the text as were the footnotes. In this book, plates were on separate pages and the notes were at the back of the book - necessitating flipping back and forth.
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By Frank E. Perry on May 8, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was going to give it 5 stars but gave it 4. The book is excellent but alas the artist who he used for the illustrations wasn't as good as the artist of his first book. At the time, he seems to have been an instructor at the Order of Santo Stefano so maybe he used someone there to do the art work. But though the art isn't up to it the content is. It includes sections on sword with rotella, targa, cape, and buckler as well as sword and dagger. He also covers dagger vs. dagger, sword and spear.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a person interested in learning historical fencing this book is an Excellent reference! I love the format as it is easier to display during practice!
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