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Lost: Signs of Life - Book #3 (Lost (Hyperion)) Mass Market Paperback – January 1, 1900


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A Spool of Blue Thread
The story of the Whitshank family told in Anne Tyler's hallmark setting—Baltimore. Read the full description | Learn more about the author
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Grade Level: 5 - 9
  • Series: Lost (Hyperion) (Book 3)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion; First Edition edition (January 1, 1900)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786890924
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786890927
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,315,387 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Frank Thompson is an author, filmmaker, and film historian with a lifelong interest in the Alamo. Among his previous twenty books are two on the subject: The Alamo: A Cultural History and Alamo Movies. He has also written many articles on the Alamo for publications ranging from Texas Monthly magazine to The Philadelphia Inquirer. As an Alamo authority, Thompson has appeared in the television documentaries The Alamo (the History Channel, 1996) and History vs. Hollywood: The Alamo (History Channel, 2001). As a producer, he prepared the current video releases of Martyrs of the Alamo (1915), With Davy Crockett at the Fall of the Alamo (1926), Heroes of the Alamo (1937), and The Alamo: Shrine of Texas Liberty (1938). For the latter film Thompson also wrote, produced, and narrated a documentary, The Alamo: Shrine of Texas Liberty . . . Lost and Found (2000).

Customer Reviews

2.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 61 people found the following review helpful By K. Falanga on April 20, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
These things are just getting worse. Why do I buy them?

The first hint should be that the back of the book names the main character as "Nick Hadley" and throughout the actual novel the main character's name is "Jeff Hadley". Is the publisher paying any bit of attention to these books?

The book is about a man who is stranded on an island after Oceanic Flight 815 crashes there. The characters names are the same. However that is where the simularity with the show of Lost ends. None of the characters act or talk like themselves and the author can't decide if the caves are somehow an evil place where no one goes or if some of the castaways live there.

There really should be a rule that if you write a Lost novel you need to actual watch the show. It's a popular show, how hard can it be to find a halfway decent author to write these things?

I don't recommend buying this book. The only reason why they can get away with such poor quality is because they stamp the word "Lost" on it and stupid fans like me buy it. Don't be like me.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Nina Matthews on April 26, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am not sure why there are so many spinoff books of the show like this, or better yet why they get published. This book kept me fairly interested in the beginning, but it just fell very, very flat.

The ending is extremely STUPID, and absolutely corny.

Don't bother with this book, it wont fulfil your need for the show between episodes.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By H. Marker on March 20, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
To begin with, this book pales in comparison to the previous installments, both written by Cathy Hapka. The author this time around, Frank Thompson, writes as if he has never seen an episode of the show, and is going by CliffsNotes given to him. Cathy Hapka was clearly a fan of the show, because she got the nuances down pat, and every bit of dialogue she put in, you could clearly imagine the character saying it. Thompson's dialogue is off, and the characters' dialects seem to have become distinctly more British, with phrases that you would be hard-pressed to hear an American say.

In addition, Thompson's story completely contradicts the Lost universe. Without giving away the plot, what happens in the story significantly changes the characters (and their relationships) that live in the Lost universe, including Hurley, Michael, and Locke. Hapka's novels, while they did involve the main character interacting with familiar Lost-aways, stayed within the bounds of the universe established by the television show, and except for the main character, the characters were the same at the end as they were in the beginning.

The one good part about Thompson's novel is that it is faithful to the 'nature' of the show, in that it involves a person forced to re-evaluate himself on the island. But because the dialogue just doesn't ring true for the characters, and because Thompson takes so many liberties in dramatically changing the relationships between familiar Lost-aways, this book comes off as more of a rough draft for an episode that was never made.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By R. Bryant on June 17, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is one of the worst books I have ever read, the author has no idea what's going on in LOST the portrayal of the characters is so off the mark that's it laughable I was so disappointed in this book that I actually threw it out in the rubbish bin. If you like LOST and need something to do in-between seasons or episodes bang you head against the wall it would be a far better use of your time
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Sutton on August 20, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book is a nice filler between seasons, but there are a few things that don't necessarily follow the storyline from the show. A major event and location is discussed in this story that, to believe, the location should have been "in" the show. The caves that are mentioned in this book are not the same as the caves the survivors live in as another reviewer stated, but they had a profound effect on some of the regulars like, Locke, Michael, and Hurley, that you would think that we would know more about this place.

It is nice to find out a little background about some of the other survivors of the flight, I just hope that the stories do not stray too far from the main theme and that as more information is released in the series, it coincides with these books as well. (i.e. descriptions of where people sat on the plane, names of passengers, and locations listed.)

Nice attempt at a story, but I think more research and closer ties to the series may be needed. If this is just a way to make some dough with the LOST stamp on the cover...then Bravo.

Overall, I would rate the overall story "ok" with a "needs improvement" in the relate to the series category.
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More About the Author

Frank Thompson is a filmmaker, comedy writer and film historian, the author of 38 books.

His most recent television work includes "Southern Fried Stings" (truTV, 2010), "High School Reunion" (TV Land, 2009), "Stringers: LA" (Tru TV, 2008-2009), "Party Heat" (Tru TV, 2008-2009), "Dance Machine" (ABC, 2008), "Speeders" (Court TV, 2007) and "Bandits vs. Smokies" (CMT, 2007). He wrote and directed a special for American Movie Classics: "The Great Christmas Movies" (1998). Other television credits include "The Bachelor: Paris" (ABC, 2006), "Blind Date" (1999-2003), "The Fifth Wheel" (2003), "Fast Food Films" (FX, 1998-99) "Reel Wild Cinema" (USA Network, 1996 - 1997), "Hollywood Babylon" (syndicated, 1992) and others.

He has written hundreds of introductory scripts for American Movie Classics hosts Cher, Alec Baldwin, Jodie Foster, Winona Ryder, Billy Bob Thornton, Roddy McDowall, Kim Hunter, Stefanie Powers, Morgan Fairchild, Phyllis Diller, Brendan Fraser, Shirley Jones, Ali MacGraw, Kirsten Dunst, Lesley-Anne Down, Patrick Wayne, Lesley Ann Warren, Sean Young and many others.

He wrote and co-produced "Frank Capra: A Personal Remembrance" (VidAmerica, 1992), and "The Making of 'It's a Wonderful Life'" (Republic Pictures, 1991), both of which appear on the DVD and Blu-Ray releases of "It's a Wonderful Life."

Thompson has contributed to several film encyclopedia and has written for magazines such as American Cinematographer, American Film, Film Comment, The Big Frame, The Hollywood Reporter, The Disney Channel Magazine, Sight and Sound, Tower Pulse! and Texas Monthly.

He has also written for many newspapers, notably The Atlanta Journal & Constitution, The Miami Herald, The Philadelphia Inquirer, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Boston Globe, The San Antonio Express News.

He served as Guest Curator for a major museum exhibit called "Hollywood Comes to South Carolina: A Century of Filmmaking in the Palmetto State" which ran from January through October, 2008 at the South Carolina State Museum in Columbia SC. This was a follow-up to his exhibit "Texas Movies" which ran in 2005 at the Bob Bullock State History Museum in Austin, Texas.

In 2004 he had a cameo appearance in "The Alamo" and also wrote two books that tied in with the film: "The Alamo: A Novel" (2004, Hyperion) and "The Alamo: The Illustrated Story of the Epic Film" (2004, Newmarket).

He has written and/or produced several videos and have contributed audio commentary to more than a dozen classic films, notably "Wild Boys of the Road" (1933), "The Time of Their Lives" (1946), "McLintock!" (1963), "Hondo" (1953) and "Track of the Cat" (1954).

And he appears onscreen in many documentaries, most recently on the Blu-Ray release of "The Day the Earth Stood Still" (2009).

Frank Thompson lives in North Hollywood, California with his wife Claire McCulloch and their dogs Maggie and Jake.

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