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Lost: The Complete Seasons 1-5

104 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

(2009)

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Lost: Season One

Along with Desperate Housewives, Lost was one of the two breakout shows in the fall of 2004. Mixing suspense and action with a sci-fi twist, it began with a thrilling pilot episode in which a jetliner traveling from Australia to Los Angeles crashes, leaving 48 survivors on an unidentified island with no sign of civilization or hope of imminent rescue. That may sound like Gilligan's Island meets Survivor, but Lost kept viewers tuning in every Wednesday night--and spending the rest of the week speculating on Web sites--with some irresistible hooks (not to mention the beautiful women). First, there's a huge ensemble cast of no fewer than 14 regular characters, and each episode fills in some of the back story on one of them. There's a doctor; an Iraqi soldier; a has-been rock star; a fugitive from justice; a self-absorbed young woman and her brother; a lottery winner; a father and son; a Korean couple; a pregnant woman; and others. Second, there's a host of unanswered questions: What is the mysterious beast that lurks in the jungle? Why do polar bears and wild boars live there? Why has a woman been transmitting an SOS message in French from somewhere on the island for the last 16 years? Why do impossible wishes seem to come true? Are they really on a physical island, or somewhere else? What is the significance of the recurring set of numbers? And will Kate ever give up her bad-boy fixation and hook up with Jack?

Lost did have some hiccups during the first season. Some plot threads were left dangling for weeks, and the "oh, it didn't really happen" card was played too often. But the strong writing and topnotch cast kept the show a cut above most network TV. The best-known actor at the time of the show's debut was Dominic Monaghan, fresh off his stint as Merry the Hobbit in Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings films. The rest of the cast is either unknowns or "where I have I seen that face before" supporting players, including Matthew Fox and Evangeline Lilly, who are the closest thing to leads. Other standouts include Naveen Andrews, Terry O'Quinn (who's made a nice career out of conspiracy-themed TV shows), Josh Holloway, Jorge Garcia, Yunjin Kim, Maggie Grace, and Emilie de Ravin, but there's really not a weak link in the cast. Co-created by J.J. Abrams (Alias), Lost left enough unanswered questions after its first season to keep viewers riveted for a second season. --David Horiuchi

Lost: Season Two

What was in the Hatch? The cliffhanger from season one of Lost was answered in its opening sequences, only to launch into more questions as the season progressed. That's right: Just when you say "Ohhhhh," there comes another "What?" Thankfully, the show's producers sprinkle answers like tasty morsels throughout the season, ending with a whopper: What caused Oceanic Air Flight 815 to crash in the first place? As the show digs into more revelations about its inhabitant's pasts, it also devotes a good chunk to new characters (Hey, it's an island; you never know who you're going to run into.) First, there are the "Tailies," passengers from the back end of the plane who crashed on the other side of the island. Among them are the wise, God-fearing ex-drug lord Mr. Eko (standout Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje); devoted husband Bernard (Sam Anderson); psychiatrist Libby (Cynthia Watros, whose character has more than one hidden link to the other islanders); and ex-cop Ana Lucia (Michelle Rodriguez), by far the most infuriating character on the show, despite how much the writers tried to incur sympathy with her flashback. Then there are the Others, first introduced when they kidnapped Walt (Malcolm David Kelley) at the end of season one. Brutal and calculating, their agenda only became more complex when one of them (played creepily by Michael Emerson) was held hostage in the hatch and, quite handily, plays mind games on everyone's already frayed nerves. The original cast continues to battle their own skeletons, most notably Locke (Terry O'Quinn), Sun (Yunjin Kim) and Michael (Harold Perrineau), whose obsession with finding Walt takes a dangerous turn. The love triangle between Jack (Matthew Fox), Kate (Evangeline Lilly) and Sawyer (Josh Holloway), which had stalled with Sawyer's departure, heats up again in the second half. Despite the bloating cast size (knocked down by a few by season's end) Lost still does what it does best: explores the psyche of people, about whom "my life is an open book" never applies, and cracks into the social dynamics of strangers thrust into Lord of the Flies-esque situations. Is it all a science experiment? A dream? A supernatural pocket in the universe? Likely, any theory will wind up on shaky ground by the season's conclusion. But hey, that's the fun of it. This show was made for DVD, and you can pause and slow-frame to your heart's content. Just try and keep that.---Ellen Kim

Lost: Season Three

When it aired in 2006-07, Lost's third season was split into two, with a hefty break in between. This did nothing to help the already weirdly disparate direction the show was taking (Kate and Sawyer in zoo cages! Locke eating goop in a mud hut!), but when it finally righted its course halfway through--in particular that whopper of a finale--the drama series had left its irked fan base thrilled once again. This doesn't mean, however, that you should skip through the first half of the season to get there, because quite a few questions find answers: what the Others are up to, the impact of turning that fail-safe key, the identity of the eye-patched man from the hatch's video monitor. One of the series' biggest curiosities from the past--how Locke ended up in that wheelchair in the first place--also gets its satisfying due. (The episode, "The Man from Tallahassee," likely was a big contributor to Terry O'Quinn's surprising--but long-deserved--Emmy win that year.)

Unfortunately, you do have to sit through a lot of aforementioned nuisances to get there. Season 3 kicks off with Jack (Matthew Fox), Kate (Evangeline Lilly), and Sawyer (Josh Holloway) held captive by the Others; Sayid (Naveen Andrews), Sun (Yunjin Kim), and Jin (Daniel Dae Kim) on a mission to rescue them; and Locke, Mr. Eko (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje), and Desmond (Henry Ian Cusick) in the aftermath of the electromagnetic pulse that blew up the hatch. Spinning the storylines away from base camp alone wouldn't have felt so disjointed were it not for the new characters simultaneously being introduced. First there's Juliet, a mysterious member of the Others whose loyalty constantly comes into question as the season goes on. Played delicately by Elizabeth Mitchell (Gia, ER, Frequency), Juliet is in one turn a cold-blooded killer, by another turn a sympathetic friend; possibly both at once, possibly neither at all. (She's also a terrific, albeit unwitting, threat to the Kate-Sawyer-Jack love triangle, which plays out more definitively this season.) On the other hand, there's the now-infamous Nikki and Paulo (Kiele Sanchez and Rodrigo Santoro), a tagalong couple who were cleverly woven into the previous seasons' key moments but came to bear the brunt of fans' ire toward the show (Sawyer humorously echoed the sentiments by remarking, "Who the hell are you?"). By the end of the season, at least two major characters die, another is told he/she will die within months, major new threats are unveiled, and--as mentioned before--the two-part season finale restores your faith in the series.

The extras are as well-stocked as a Dharma Initiative food pantry on this seven-disc set. Commentaries by producer Damon Lindelof, show writers, and numerous cast members reveal a whole lot of juicy trivia; plus, the DVDs even provide a subtitle track for the commentary (rarely seen other than on foreign-language director's commentaries) so you won't miss a thing. "Lost Book Club" goes through the parallels between what characters are reading and the show's storylines (The Wizard of Oz and Stephen King are heavily referenced). "Lost: On Location" gives a lot of insight to some of the biggest episodes, and "Lost in a Day" gives a 24-hour glimpse at the drama's arduous production. If you're a Lost fan who gave up during this season, the bonus features alone might lure you back for the next round. --Ellen A. Kim

Lost: Season Four

Season four of Lost was a fine return to form for the series, which polarized its audience the year before with its focus on The Others and not enough on our original crash victims. That season's finale introduced a new storytelling device--the flash-forward--that's employed to great effect this time around; by showing who actually got off the island (known as the Oceanic Six), the viewer is able to put to bed some longstanding loose ends. As the finale attests, we see that in the future Jack (Matthew Fox) is broken, bearded, and not sober, while Kate (Evangeline Lilly) is estranged from Jack and with another guy (the identity may surprise you). Four others do make it back to their homes, but as the flash-forwards show, it's definitely not the end of their connection to the island. Back in present day, however, the islanders are visited by the denizens of a so-called rescue ship, who have agendas of their own. While Jack works with the newcomers to try to get off the island, Locke (Terry O'Quinn), with a few followers of his own, forms an uneasy alliance with Ben (Michael Emerson) against the suspicious gang. Some episodes featuring the new characters feel like filler, but the evolution of such characters as Sun and Jin (Yunjin Kim and Daniel Dae Kim) is this season's strength; plus, the love story of Desmond (Henry Ian Cusick) and Penny (Sonya Walger) provides some of the show's emotional highlights. As is the custom with Lost, bullets fly and characters die (while others may or may not have). Moreover, the fate of Michael (Harold Perrineau), last seen traitorously sailing off to civilization in season two, as well as the flash-forwards of the Oceanic Six, shows you never quite leave the island once you've left. There's a force that pulls them in, and it's a hook that keeps you watching.

Season four was a shorter 13 episodes instead of the usual 22 due to the 2008 writers' strike; nonetheless, the set comes with two discs of extras. One of the best features is "LOST in 8:15," which is a rapid-fire summation of the series thus far in eight minutes, 15 seconds. Narrated by a hilariously droll female, it includes lines such as "Jack meets Kate. Kate stitches up Jack. They bond." and "They see Jack play football with Mr. Friendly. Mr. Friendly throws like a girl." The featurette "The Right to Bear Arms" takes a fun look at the prop masters responsible for supplying the castaways with guns--and keeping track of who has one and who doesn't (best here is Sawyer's (Josh Holloway) assertion that characters often cock their guns just to look cool). Cast members Lilly, Garcia, Yunjin Kim, and Daniel Dae Kim provide a few of the commentaries, and the set even comes with an amusing safety guide for Oceanic Airlines. (Example: "if you notice black smoke emanating from the plane, please alert the captain. It is either a problem with the engines or a mysterious creature.") Finally, for those who bought the standard-def DVD, take a closer look at the front cover after you've removed the O-sleeve; you'll notice the entire cast has been blacked out save for a few: the Oceanic Six. --Ellen A. Kim

Lost: Season Five

Since Lost made its debut as a cult phenomenon in 2004, certain things seemed inconceivable. In its fourth year, some of those things, like a rescue, came to pass. The season ended with Locke (Terry O'Quinn) attempting to persuade the Oceanic Six to return, but he dies before that can happen--or so it appears--and where Jack (Matthew Fox) used to lead, Ben (Emmy nominee Michael Emerson) now takes the reins and convinces the survivors to fulfill Locke's wish.

As producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse state in their commentary on the fifth-season premiere, "We're doing time travel this year," and the pile-up of flashbacks and flash-forwards will make even the most dedicated fan dizzy. Ben, Jack, Hurley (Jorge Garcia), Sayid (Naveen Andrews), Sun (Yunjin Kim), and Kate (Evangeline Lilly) arrive to find that Sawyer (Josh Holloway) and Juliet (Elizabeth Mitchell) have been part of the Dharma Initiative for three years. The writers also clarify the roles that Richard (Nestor Carbonell) and Daniel (Jeremy Davies) play in the island's master plan, setting the stage for the prophecies of Daniel's mother, Eloise Hawking (Fionnula Flanagan), to play a bigger part in the sixth and final season.

Dozens of other players flit in and out, some never to return. A few, such as Jin (Daniel Dae Kim), live again in the past. Lost could've wrapped things up in five years, as The Wire did, but the show continues to excite and surprise. As Lindelof and Cuse admit in the commentary, there's a "fine line between confusion and mystery," adding, "it makes more sense if you're drunk." Other extras include deleted scenes, featurettes, a "lost" episode of Mysteries of the Universe, and commentary from writers Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz on "He's Our You," a reference to Sayid, who tries to change the future by changing the past. --Kathleen C. Fennessy


Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Format: NTSC
  • Studio: ABC Video
  • DVD Release Date: December 8, 2009
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (104 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0021L8FO4
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #77,967 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Cthulhu #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on December 8, 2009
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Everyone should be aware that there is NOTHING in this set that's not in the individual edition. Each of the seasons in its separate box, shrink-wrapped and sealed.

Anyone who already has the individual seasons should have no reason to get this unless they wish to upgrade from DVD to Blu. Those who don't have LOST yet, this should the right set to buy or... wait until the 6-seasons sets become available next year.

To me, LOST is the best TV series of the third millennium, so far. In fact, I am very surprised that a TV series could be made this good these days when cost cutting and declining standards seem to be the norm everywhere else. But, not in the world of television, it seems. Or, rather, LOST and a couple other shows (Heroes is another favorite of mine) happen to be the exception.

LOST employs a cast of dozens to tell a big story. How big the story is? Well... five years and it's still going so... it's big. Slowly, what begins as your run of the mill airliner crash survivors story keeps adding layers on top of layers, expands, branches out in unexpected directions and, episode after episode after episode keeps us mesmerized, guessing, mourning those lost and left behind, surprised, intrigued and always ready for more. 100 episodes later and we are used to expect the unexpected now. I will not reveal the plot but it's probably proper to note that you are going to see peoples struggling to overcome extreme circumstances, stories of friendship, love, solidarity, spontaneous cooperation, the inevitable conflicts between people of many different upbringings, chasing different dreams, sometimes competing for the same rewards.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By V. Rodriguez on December 8, 2009
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
This is a friggin sweet Sci-fi series for any geek. BUT if you haven't watch this series yet, DO NOT watch the video linked above!! It's a Spoiler BOMB! I watched the whole show on ABC.com and they have that video there and my curiosity made me watch it and got spoiled BIG TIME! (and I was just starting season 1) So if you wanna get surprised please do not watch that video!
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What can i say about the show? well it's so addicting that I watch the entire show in 2 weeks, and now i'm re-watching it again with some friends. Every time you re-watch you find more stuff that you never notice and if you watch it with friends then believe me, you're going to have a great conversation for hours with bunch of theories and before you know it, you are so hooked that you will dream about the Island!
This is a must see show and this is a AWESOME deal you don't wanna miss!

(I never write any reviews but I just have to, this deserves to be reviewed :D)
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By LOSTaholic on November 1, 2009
Format: DVD
I don't agree with the first review. It's a lot to easy just to define LOST as an ongoing mystery-TV-show that does not answer questions!

First of all, one of the most important questions "dude, where are we?" that was asked in the pilot, has not been answered yet and this is so for a good reason (we know what happened with TWIN PEAKS when the murderer was revealed...).

Second, LOST has always been from Season 1 about mysteries. Very often answers were given, but the fans sometimes didn't even appreciate the answering of questions (or maybe it was not the answer they expected). Personally, I cannot think of any other TV-show that changes so dramatically from Season to Season. Normally TV-shows are really repetitive and have the same themes everey season. In LOST however, and this is true for all seasons (except maybe the fourth one) the audience can't actually tell when, where and how the show is going to continue. We didn't really know the content of the hatch, we didn't know what would happen to Desmond at the end of S2, how did the Losties get back to the main land? Why did John Locke die (we got the answer to that, but many fans didn't appreciate that answer!), where did the Island go? And now after Season 5: What happened to Jacob? Where did the Losties go? Now if you don't like to think and if you prefer some lame and boring TV-show then LOST is simply not your thing. Quentin Tarantino once said: You don't go to a metallica concert and tell the fu...rs to turn the volume down.

We must not forget that the producers of LOST wanted to tell a very specific story from the very beginning.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Literati on December 23, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is the smartest, funniest, most entertaining show on television. We love having all five seasons on DVD. Buy this set now. Put the first disc in your DVD player. Sit back and let the fun begin. WARNING: Your dishes and laundry won't get done. Your dog won't get walked. Your kids will have to do their own homework. Yes, it's that good.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By AppleTools on February 6, 2010
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
If you like the show and you have Full HD (1080p) on your TV there is not better way to watch the show. I played the discs on my PS3 that is connected to my Full HD Sony Bravia with an HDMI cable to ensure the best possible quality.

I have seen this show on normal TV, DVD, HD Broadcast on TV and on my Mac (iTunes mp4s) and I can tell the picture and sound are far better than anything else. Buying the 5 seasons as a bundle was even cheaper than buying all seasons on iTunes.

I am very happy I can review the whole story at it's maximum quality just before final season starts...
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I want to know this too, and I guess A LOT of people too
Dec 8, 2009 by Pedro Peñaranda |  See all 4 posts
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