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Lost Art of Time Travel


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Audio CD, September 23, 2008

Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 23, 2008)
  • Original Release Date: 2008
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Progressive Rock/Mvd
  • ASIN: B001DGSGSI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #550,806 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. The Mind Machine
2. Thieves
3. You're Alive
4. One Tradgedy at a Time
5. Im Not Blind
6. Easy Tomorrow
7. Haze

Editorial Reviews

An immense supporter of the early works of Yes, Kansas, and Genesis (among others), Metal Church guitarist Kurdt Vanderhoof sought to create a project that reflected his predilection of that era and he has undoubtedly achieved that objective with Presto Ballet.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Robert M Briggs III on November 22, 2008
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This CD featured a serious shakeup from the lineup on their debut, "Peace Among the Ruins". Only leader/founder Kurdt Vanderhoof and lead vocalist Scott Albright remain from the original lineup. Basically the same pieces are in place here, with the arrangements being more cohesive and less.... hard rock? The nods are all there: Styx, Kansas, Yes, Genesis, name your prog poison.
Unlike the first CD, tho, there is not a single "meh" number on this CD. My personal favorite track is "One Tragedy At a Time". And coming in at just over 14 minutes long, it's quite a jamfest, with a chorus that just won't quit. "I'm Not Blind" is quite a rant, while "The Mind Machine" and "You're Alive" are seriously proggish.
A whopping 4.5 stars.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Graeme P. Swallow on March 18, 2009
Format: Audio CD
I was much looking forward to this disc after Presto Ballet's debut "Peace Among the Ruins". But if you have "Peace..." and you buy this disc, put all your expectations on the shelf. The very first thing that jumped out at me was the utter lack of bombast (for lack of a better word). This CD is definitely lighter-duty than "Peace...". As someone who prefers the heavier side of prog rock (i.e., Dream Theater, Shadow Gallery, etc...), my initial reaction was disappointment.

HOWEVER... I have listened to the disc straight through 5 or 6 times now, and I will say it is growing on me. After all, it is still Presto Ballet. There are certainly very intriguing chord progressions, rhythms, and so on. There is a lot to appreciate about this disc once you accept it as it's own entity and throw away your expectations based on the previous disc.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donald L. Garrison Jr. on November 14, 2009
Format: MP3 Music
Wow, I had heard good things about this Kurdt Vanderhoof band and it was correct. This album sounds like it could have been written in 1975. I have always loved Metal Church, but this is 100% different. Sounds like Kansas, Gentle Giant or Genesis. The synth player sounds a lot like Rick Wakeman. Kurdt's playing is solid. The drummer Bill Raymond is very good.
Excellent price for this 7 song album. These are long songs though. Get this today.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tnahpellee on June 8, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Although their first album from 2005 is a highly enjoyable piece of art-rock in the style of 70's bands like Styx, full of colourful synths, catchy choruses and big rocking riffs.

On their second album, they have gone overboard with big long (and unnecessary) instrumentals sections. What are they trying to prove? That they are today's version of Emerson, Lake and Palmer? I was highly disappointed with this release, as it puts their strengths aside and puts their weakness into the spotlight. Sometimes when you listen to a Presto Ballet song you hear a catchy chorus, then your mind kind of wanders as they go for a big long instrumental and then when you hear the chorus again ten minutes later you're like 'It's still the same song?'

Now I have nothing against big long instrumentals, but this band is NOT as talented as Emerson Lake or Palmer, Yes, Genesis, etc. and anyway it's not necessary for them to prove their prog muscles by making big fifteen minute anthems. In short, their long instrumentals don't come up with a lot of good ideas, not enough to keep it interesting.

There are some good tracks here, the first song actually is pretty good for the ten minute duration, and then 'You're Alive' is a beautiful song and the rocking 'I'm not blind' is classic stuff. But the rest is hit and miss at best.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mark Gatzke on November 6, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Like Presto Ballet's debut, Peace Among the Ruins, The Lost Art of Time Travel is a solid piece of work that embraces the finer elements of classic hard rock and progressive rock. Where it differs from the first CD, however, is in the presence of occasionally superfluous prog. While Peace Among the Ruins holds indulgence neatly in check and keeps a healthy balance between prog and straight ahead rock, Time Travel opens things up for more elaborate production and a mildly trying reliance on intense or moody repetition rather than creative substance. The two longest songs, 'The Mind Machine' and 'One Tragedy at a Time', run a little long for my taste. It doesn't necessarily make the ride less enjoyable, but I'm just the tiniest bit grateful when they finally end.
On the scale of things, it's a minor quibble. Presto Ballet are very, very good at what they do. There are few bands like them to be found these days except for their aging forerunners who are, for the most part, regurgitating what they did long ago. Even so, while their sensibilities lie firmly in the past, Presto Ballet sound very much like a modern, energetic band with plenty of ideas to spare and to come. I look forward to their next effort.
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