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Lost Twin Cities Paperback


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Lost Twin Cities + Twin Cities Then and Now (Minnesota) + Once There Were Castles: Lost Mansions and Estates of the Twin Cities
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 346 pages
  • Publisher: Minnesota Historical Society Press; 1 edition (October 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0873512731
  • ISBN-13: 978-0873512732
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 9.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #449,492 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

As this book makes abundantly clear, many of the memorable buildings in Minneapolis and St. Paul have been lost to the wrecker's ball. Millett's carefully researched book is a valiant effort to reconstruct, in words and illustrations, this rich architectural legacy. The author ( The Curve of the Arch , Minnesota Historical Society, 1985) presents an impressive sampling of the vanished buildings of the Twin Cities, tracing their history and including information on who the owners and architects were, how these structures were used, why they were torn down, and what occupies each site today. Lost Twin Cities makes us mourn for the richness that has been lost but also makes us appreciate how much has survived. Highly recommended for anyone interested in urban history.
- H. Ward Jandl, National Park Svce., Washington, D.C.
Copyright 1992 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Publisher

Winner, 1993 American Institute of Architects International Architecture Book Award

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 5, 1999
Format: Paperback
Larry Millet, who also writes a series of wonderful Sherlock Holmes mysteries, has created a gem here. In fact, it's the best book on lost architecture to come along since Constance Grieff's "Lost America." Fantastic and beautifully reproduced black and white photographs take us on a heartbreaking tour of all the places now gone forever from the Twin Cities. You'll be treated to views of lost mansions, train stations, churches, hotels and schools (including my personal favorite, the Minneapolis Central High School). This is also a must for fans of Victorian architecture (some of the finest examples ever built can be seen here) or folks who've read Millet's Sherlock Holmes novels and would like to see some of the places mentioned (such as James Hill's Second Empire mansion). The price is a real bargin for a book of this quality, and I wish there was a similar volume for every city in the U.S. The only way to get a better glimpse of the historic architecture of the Twin Cities would be to build a time machine.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By I. Westray on April 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
Reading Lost Twin Cities feels like you've found that great uncle or aunt who can explain all the black and white family photos. This is a great example of the historian's art, a real case in which an author, by choosing a particular way to frame a set of information, calls a past world back to vivid life. It's a bittersweet pleasure to relive the life span of each historical building. Millet's approach is anecdotal, like that old relative's conversational voice.
Indirectly, this book also raises some natural questions about our country's urban development. The demise of the Twin Cities' streetcar system is particularly well described, for example. I could see a creative professor, teaching a lower level course on urban development, assigning this book as a text. (The same professor would also have students view "Chinatown.")
The book was also adapted for television by the local (Minneapolis and Saint Paul) public station. The program is quite entertaining, and catches the tone of the book pretty well.
Larry Millet has written a few Sherlock Holmes mysteries, largely as an excuse to present much of this same historical information in a livelier way. If you're considering which approach to take, stick to this. The mysteries are awful, extremely flat-footed and despiriting for an Arthur Conan Doyle fan; this is a wonderful book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jacquelyn Lavaque on January 1, 2009
Format: Paperback
It's most fitting that the cover photo would feature the amazing interior of what's perhaps Minneapolis's most famous "lost" building, the Metropolitan Building. Such a shame that magnificent edifice was brought down-- it was still mostly occupied and in good shape despite its age when the city decided to wreck it. So many buildings in downtown Minneapolis's Gateway District were torn down from the 1950s to the 1980s, and it's only in the past few years the resulting empty lots are finally starting to see condos, shops and hotels going up on them again. No doubt, the Gateway District needed cleaning up, since it was well known as Minneapolis's "skid row" since the 1930s, but I still question the city's wisdom in ripping down so many historic buildings wholesale just to "clean out" the area. This award-winning book is a wonderful addition to the collection of anyone interested in the history of Minnesota, the Twin Cities, or pre-20th century urban architecture.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have a newer version of this book, and I just wanted to say that it is a very, very interesting book. Even if you arn't originally from the Twin Cities this book is still very interesting to look at to see how things have changed over the years such as the cars, the billboards/advertisements, and the way people dressed. I think that this is definetly worth every cent, and I look forward for another edition to come out with different photos of streets in the Twin Cities.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After thoroughly enjoying the LOST TWIN CITIES television specials on TPT2, I decided to order the book from Amazon. I am thrilled with what a large, beautiful volume it is. Much more extensive than what I expected --a genuine "read" as opposed to mere coffee-table decoration. Full of photographs and memories --happy ghosts. Thank you, Larry Millet. I suspect I rather would have liked being an architectural historian.
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