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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A classic genre brought alive again through e-books.
I first read this book when I was in grade school. I happened across it recently 40 years later and fell in love with it all over again. There is something about late Victorian era adventure tales - specifically English ones - that have always appealed to me. Doyle, Kipling, and others with their characters that dash off across the British Empire, etc, etc. While the...
Published 10 months ago by Harley

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic adventure, questionable science
Outside of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's most famous creation is the scientist and adventurer George Edward Challenger. Professor Challenger starred in three novels and two short stories, beginning with The Lost World, first published in 1912. Edward Malone, a journalist of athletic build but timid demeanor, seeks an interview with Challenger,...
Published 20 months ago by Karl Janssen


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A classic genre brought alive again through e-books., November 20, 2013
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This review is from: The Lost World (Kindle Edition)
I first read this book when I was in grade school. I happened across it recently 40 years later and fell in love with it all over again. There is something about late Victorian era adventure tales - specifically English ones - that have always appealed to me. Doyle, Kipling, and others with their characters that dash off across the British Empire, etc, etc. While the charaterizations in the book are sexist, racist, and twelve other "ists" as compared with modern thinking, there is a certain classic form and content to the story telling of this era that started my wanderlust as a boy and brought fond memories to an aging man. If you never read Doyle, Welles, Kipling, or Burroughs as an adolescent then you may not want to start now as the books will feel old fashioned and hoplessly out of place in today's world; but if you grew up with these authors they are worth another visit for a glimpse back into a time where adventures ruled, the guy always got the girl, and the characters had simple and clear values and beliefs (albeit often narrow minded and bigoted).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic adventure, questionable science, January 2, 2013
By 
Karl Janssen (Olathe, KS United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Lost World (Kindle Edition)
Outside of the Sherlock Holmes stories, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's most famous creation is the scientist and adventurer George Edward Challenger. Professor Challenger starred in three novels and two short stories, beginning with The Lost World, first published in 1912. Edward Malone, a journalist of athletic build but timid demeanor, seeks an interview with Challenger, hoping the eccentric misanthrope might provide some good copy for his paper. Though at first Challenger is hostile to the reporter out of a general hatred for those of his profession, he soon takes a liking to the young man. The relationship between the two characters is very similar to that between Holmes and Watson, except that Challenger is a bigger jerk than Holmes and a far less intriguing character. Challenger reveals to his newfound confidant that in the Amazon rain forest he has discovered a remote plateau where prehistoric creatures that have long been thought extinct still thrive. When Challenger makes his findings public before a meeting of the Zoological Institute, he is confronted by doubters. To test the veracity of his claims, an expedition is hastily organized, consisting of Dr. Summerlee, a rival scientist; Lord John Roxton, an aristocratic sportsman, and Malone, who volunteers for the journey in hopes not only of finding a good story but also of adding some much-needed adventure to his life.

Malone is the narrator of the tale, and most of the book is written in the form of letters sent back to his newspaper. This makes for an awkward construction, as it becomes clear that at the end of every chapter Malone is going to be safe in camp scribbling his account, while some overly convenient method will be contrived for an Indian to carry off his letter to the civilized world.

The Lost World is the prototypical tale of a team of scientists venturing into unknown lands, upon which Jurassic Park is just one of hundreds of descendants. In typical Conan Doyle fashion, the story starts out at a rather slow pace, with secrets being revealed gradually over time. Though this challenges the attention span of the 21st-century reader, there is a charming freshness to the sense of wonder expressed when remarkable discoveries are finally made. Dinosaurs live! It should come as no surprise that the expedition eventually reaches the plateau and finds the prehistoric creatures in question. The fact that the adventurers are not travelling back in time, but rather visiting an area of evolutionary stagnation, allows Conan Doyle to indulge in some evolutionary anachronisms. In this world, unlike in prehistoric reality, dinosaurs coexist alongside prehistoric mammals, ape-like humanoids, and modern Native Americans. One of the book's disappointments is that it does not spend enough time on the dinosaurs, but brushes by them rather quickly in order to focus on the apemen, at which point it becomes just another white-man-conquering-the-savages story. Throughout the book, the expedition members seem less concerned with practicing science than they are with invading a new territory. Towards the end of the book, the expedition team makes a choice that no scientist would ever make, a choice to destroy rather than to preserve. The overall message of the book, rather blatantly stated, is one of the superiority of man over nature, and, less obviously, of white European men in particular.

Though it was perhaps ground breaking for its time, and it's certainly a step above run-of-the-mill pulp fiction, The Lost World has since been surpassed by many of the imitators it inspired. Those who appreciate classic adventure fiction will find much to appreciate, but it should not be considered a must-read by any means.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good to the last drop, February 3, 2014
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This review is from: The Lost World (Kindle Edition)
I have always been a big fan of the Sherlock Holmes series, especially the full-length mysteries. In this classic, Doyle in no way disappoints. I honestly can't wait to read it again. A wonderful sci-fi adventure with the added bonus of being an incredible period piece.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Still a joy to read, May 25, 2013
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This review is from: The Lost World (Kindle Edition)
I had forgotten what a delight this book is. From the first page on it can do nothing but make you smile. Recalling a time before the sanitised world of the politically correct, it is a delight to remember the supreme arrogance of the English upper class. Not to mention the misguided notions of dinosaurs. Did you know they dragged their tails and used them to hop? Doyle was such a brilliant writer, he nearly makes one forget the advances in science that we all take for granted these days. If you've never taken the time to read "The Lost World", I highly recommend doing so.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Tale of Adventure, January 29, 2013
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This review is from: The Lost World (Kindle Edition)
I rate this one five stars. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was a master of his craft. He builds his tale as the plot unfolds, and he maintains a steady and constant pace from start to finish. Fans of H. Rider Haggard will recognize the Lost World premise from his novels such as King Solomon's Mines and She. When Haggard wrote those tales, Africa was still a vast wilderness of unexplored lands, unnamed rivers, and unknown peoples. Alas, when Doyle wrote The Lost World, the map of Africa was no longer covered by blank spaces, so, it is to the vast jungles of the Amazon basin that he takes us to find this Lost World. Long familiar with his stories of Sherlock Holmes and the staid and reserved narratives of Dr. Watson, I was pleasantly surprised by Doyle's fluid and descriptive prose displayed in this bold tale of adventure delivered through the voice of a new narrator. Indeed, I am left to wonder; what other surprising tales might we have had from his pen if he hadn't found such an admirable, and valuable, literary vehicle as his famous detective?

You may think you know the story, but, I assure you, if you haven't read it, you don't know it. I highly recommend this to anyone that loves a great tale of adventure.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Engrossing Vintage Thriller, October 11, 2011
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This review is from: The Lost World (Kindle Edition)
When it first came out almost two decades ago, "Jurassic Park" (the movie) was a huge sensation. Steven Spielberg marshaled Hollywood's technical wizardry in order to create the closest that we'll ever be to seeing the actual dinosaurs. Spielberg's adaptation of Michael Crichton's novel by the same name was revolutionary in many respects. However, the distinction of creating and popularizing the "modern man meets dinosaur" sci-fi subgenre belongs to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Almost a century ago he wrote "The Lost World," and imaginative and suspenseful novel that tracks an expedition of European scientists, journalists, and adventurers deep inside the South American jungles where they explore a hitherto undiscovered plateau that seems to have been cut-off from the rest of the world for millions of years, and where some dreadful prehistoric creatures still roam.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is best known for creating Sherlock Holmes, one of the most famous literary characters of all time. Sherlock Holmes was based on an actual person, a university professor that Doyle knew, and was characterized by cold, calculating and brilliant abilities of deduction. "The Lost World" has seen the introduction of Professor Challenger, a character that Doyle used for a few more of his subsequent works. Challenger is no less brilliant than Sherlock Holmes, but in every other psychological (and physical) trait is the exact opposite of the famous sleuth. Where Holmes is cold and aloof, Challenger is passionate and physically confrontational. In terms of appearance, Challenger is stocky and exceptionally strong, and sports a long black beard. Challenger continues Doyle tradition of strong-minded characters that use wit and ingenuity to solve even the problems where the brute force may seem to rule the day. Personally I found the scenes of disputes between scientists and academic particularly amusing: it seems that very little has changed in the last hundred years.

The creatures in this story are a bit of a jumble of dinosaurs and some more recently extinct plants and animals. A few scenes in the book are worthy of any action movie, and have been well orchestrated. In today's terms it is quite unrealistic to believe that over millions of years certain species have persisted (and others had joined them), but if you can suspend disbelief on this point then you will certainly enjoy this book.

Doyle is a masterful storyteller, and aside from a few linguistic and historical peculiarities that reveal its age, "The Lost World" could easily go head-to-head with anything that Michael Crichton or some other modern sci-fi/thriller writer could come up.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Early macho fiction, August 18, 2014
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This review is from: The Lost World (Kindle Edition)
Conan Doyle wrote much more than just the Sherlock Holmes mysteries; for example a masterful memoir of his time in South Africa during the Anglo Boer war. This is a reasonably well-known work, filmed a few times. There is a certain amount of humour, and some great imaginative and descriptive writing, and the action never ceases. It surprises me that it hasn't been re-filmed in modern times. Maybe it's because, although the narrator gets involved to impress a girl, there's no sustained Hollywood love interest. ACD was very much a man's man. He was a real adventurer as well as an author-no little women on this safari! As with the S H writing, characters are exaggerated, but it's fun. Naturally, like many British authors of the time, he expresses an inbred assumption of the superiority of the race, especially in descriptions of other races and nationalities, which jars a bit on modern sensibilities, but it was reflective of the era. Still a decent holiday read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars good but nostalgic, September 4, 2014
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This review is from: The Lost World (Kindle Edition)
Looks like Murakami goes back to novels like Kafka on the Shore. The peek he gives of Haida it's not detailed or deep enough and the
Whole rape/dreams episodes have the potential to complicate that mystical realism than Murakami manages so well.

Disapointed becouse it was so short and felt like a short story elongated to a novel length and feel some situations were left in the air nethertheless magic comes from his pen and as always he dreams for me and make feel I am the one dreaming. Translation done by him is impecable.

Looking forward to another of his books and highly recomend it specially to people new to him
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fun, fun, fin, July 11, 2014
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This review is from: The Lost World (Kindle Edition)
Hard to swallow, but I didn't care. Pure fun and adventure. Better the all the movies based on it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, July 7, 2014
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Amazon Customer (Wooster, Ohio, US) - See all my reviews
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Hey Doyle is a classic. Old style writing and setting but it is always enjoyable.
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The Lost World
The Lost World by Arthur Conan Doyle
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