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96 of 102 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon March 18, 2010
If you've read "What Every Body Is Saying," then you can safely skip past the first four chapters of this. If you've got a little bit of common sense with regards to whether or not facial tattoos and dirty sneakers are professional looking, make it the first six chapters. The best part of this book focuses on practical applications of what was learned in the author's previous works, and it starts in the 7th chapter. This is unfortunately the second-to-last real chapter in the entire thing, so consider reading it in the store and buying the other one instead; it's a lot more interesting.

I must also disagree with some of the author's preferences in what constitutes good customer service--do you really want an overzealous dedicated greeter pretending that you are the most important person in the world every time you walk through a door? I go out of my way to avoid places like that, personally, but my interest in this subject matter is rooted in a desire to spot and name these manipulative tricks they teach you in MBA programs rather than to employ them myself, so I'm probably not its target audience.
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51 of 56 people found the following review helpful
on September 8, 2010
I was excited to see that Navarro had written a second book, so of course I purchased it.

Then, I began to feel some serious dejavu. Some of the sections are word-for-word from his first book, "What Every BODY is Saying". Do not purchase both books, or you will be disappointed!

If you are a fan of Paul Ekman's or Daniel Goleman's books, you will only be annoyed by the simplicity and inaccuracies of Navarro's books. Rather than wasting your money, just go back and re-read the Ekman books you may already own!
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
on September 8, 2010
I found this book to be very informative and entertaining in general until I got to the part where the author says when you meet a person of Asian descent, you should bow. He thinks it makes the Asian person feel more comfortable. (It could work if you are "surrounded" by Japanese or Korean people visiting the U.S.) I personally feel that it is rather rude to single out a person, and greet in such a way that "stereotypes" the race that you assume that person belongs to. I have experienced this a few times in my life, and I felt very uncomfortable and even offended and hurt. Therefore, I felt that some of the advice on this book should be applied with great caution.
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
I love this book for a quite a few reasons but to start with it starts out and sets up the explanation that everything counts, all of you interactions, your clothing, your attention to detail or lack of, and your interpersonal communications skills. In a noisy world with many choices some of yours are made without really understanding why, that also goes for your clients. I read just about every book that comes out on body language and this one is great and not just a rehash of the last one that came out a few months or years ago.

In a very stimulated visual society we gravitate to symmetrical beautiful objects or people, and that is a lesson in itself. People also pick up on verbal communication skills just as much as looks, sloppy speaking or pronunciation will also lose a deal. Mirroring physically to gain comfort and rapport is just as important with verbal cues as it is for your vocal tones and words.

The book does a great job of explaining how people will make their opinions based on your behaviors and that determines their buying decisions.
The section on comfort vs. discomfort is discussed and explained and will give you an aha moment and give you some powerful insight on non verbal communication and is worth buying the book in itself.

This book is very well written, thought out and in depth book, I wouldn't say that it is an easy read but more of an important anthology of non verbal communication you need to have in your library because of the knowledge you will gain. There are so many good things in this book that I am sure that reading a few times I could pick up some valuable tips that I passed over the first time.

Buy some copies for you sales staff or anybody that talks to your clients.
As you read this book you will question how many mistakes you make on a daily basis and find the fixes to change them for the better.

So just how much money or clients have you lost in the past year, month or day? You will only know by reading and studying the book.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on July 5, 2011
This is a slight modification of the author's first book "What everybody is saying", with better illustrations and adaptations for common working class. For those who had not read any book about body language before, this will give them some helpful and practical tips. For those who had read books of the same genre and were attracted by the ex FBI background of the author, I am afraid they will be disappointed.

p.s. Below please find some of my favorite passages for your reference.
A loudmouth and a fast talker stand out negatively not because of what they say but how they say it. Conversely we appreciate the reassuring quality of the considerate and deliberative talker, but feel impatient with someone who talks too slowly. Pg10
Steepling (finger tips touching) demonstrates confidence and focus. It is one of the most powerful displays we can use to convince others of our confidence. Pg60
When it's time to go, one foot will point away in the direction of travel. Look for this when conversing: It's an accurate "I have to leave" intention signal. Pg44
Head tilt communicates effectively. "I'm listening, I'm comfortable, I'm receptive, I'm friendly". We reserve exposing our necks for friendly individuals and environment. Pg66
Healthy individuals maintain their good grooming. We preen ourselves (fixing a tie, picking off a lint) to perfect our appearance so others will notice us (birds also do this). This is something I teach attorneys to do, especially, when the jury walks into the room. By positively preening (by pressing their clothes against body, pulling up on their belt), they are transmitting: I care. Pg77
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on March 30, 2010
I was stunned at how accessible and convincing this book was. It takes a lot of thought and work to make it seem so easy. The guy knows his stuff backwards and forwards and it is very easy to read (maybe thanks in part to the co-author). I find myself saying "oh, yeah, I always do that when I feel such and such a way." I expected not to find much of value but every page is full of real tips that are easy to absorb. And he is not worried about being politically correct. He gives specific advice that men and women each need to hear (men - clean your fingernails, for example, it matters). The book is geared to help you present your best self from your appearance, tone of your voice, posture, etc, whether applying for a job or just making a presentation. He uses a large amount of empirical data and personal anecdotes from his vast experience to convince you about the importance of presenting yourself properly. I was really impressed when he said, "sure its not fair to judge people on their appearance but life isn't fair". We all make judgments every second based on appearances whether we want to or not. So if you are ready to hear some straight talk and want to improve how you come off, I can't recommend this book highly enough. Let me reiterate that I found this book easy to read and absorb. I really think it will be of use to me. I can't remember another book on this topic that compares.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on August 9, 2010
This book can do more for your business, both internally and externally, than perhaps any ad could do. This is because when it comes down to it, your business is assessed upon first impressions. Ads or campaigns may draw people to your business, but it is the first impression clients and customers get from their first few minutes of experience within your walls or with your employees that ultimately makes or breaks whether they will continue to spend money or work with you. Joe Navarro teaches you everything from what to wear to how to arrange your office, all in order to achieve the goal you wish to attain, namely a great, successful, and above all, approachable business. Heed his words for though nonverbals may be simple or subtle, they make a difference between a sealed deal and a walk out.

This book is especially beneficial to those job hunting. An effective HR employee interviewing potential candidates will know that only 50% of the information you are acquiring from an interview are simply the answers to your questions. You will gain just as much information, if not more from their behaviors. Therefore, those out in the labor market trying to obtain a job would find this book immensely valuable.

Overall, this book is essential, whether you are a staunch business man or just someone who wishes to improve their social behavior and effectiveness. It is a must-have.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 2011
After reading "What Everybody is Saying" and generally applying the skills in that book to my career, I bought Navarro's new book and it was about what I expected.

It is true that the first few chapters, and many points throughout the book, are found in his first book. I didn't really mind reading through this, as it helped reinforce those skills and Navarro did make some good connections to the world of business. If you are looking for a book on body language, get "What Everybody is Saying" instead. Some of the points are a bit biased based on the author's prior experience, but as with any book you take what you can from it and make your own decisions.

There is good, original material in "Louder Than Words". I found myself reading a few paragraphs and thinking "this is pretty common sense stuff", but then realizing how many times I'd been a customer and had been turned off by the nonverbals of a particular business. Or how many job candidates didn't quite live up to nonverbal expectations. Just because it is common sense doesn't mean you and your company meets the standard and cares about not sending everyone and their money elsewhere.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on April 5, 2010
Once again Joe Navarro's easy writing style conveys pearls of wisdom of how the most subtle of non-verbal signals that we are constantly transmitting are perceived by others.

The book does recap some of the material from Joe's previous book (What Every BODY is Saying: An Ex-FBI Agent's Guide to Speed-Reading People) and then goes on to expand on them in various scenarios such as business meetings, job interviews etc. many of which are illuminated with examples garnered from Joe's own experience (e.g. his father driving past as hardware store because the windows are dirty - `If they don't take care of their windows - they're not going to take care of you').

The book has plenty of pointers on what to look for in non-verbal communication in others as well as how to enhance your own message using this hidden language.

I've got at least three things from this book that I'm emailing to my CEO about how our company can be better perceived; changes of behaviours that are small, simple and inexpensive, but which could have a huge difference - thanks Joe!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 17, 2012
I read this book very quickly and reviewed all of it twice. It takes some very intuitive material and makes it easy to use. The biggest problem i see is i now over-analyze what other people aren't saying or what they are saying about the words that are coming out of their mouth. I also used some of the ques in my medical school interviews and it probably helped me get my acceptance to school this fall. The book is a very useful tool and very informative.
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