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Louder Than Words: A Mother's Journey in Healing Autism Hardcover – Bargain Price, September 17, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton Adult; 1 edition (September 17, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525950117
  • ASIN: B003F76DPG
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (393 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #405,528 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Jenny McCarthy takes us on journey of a mom dealing with her son’s Autism diagnosis and treatment. We learn what it is like to be a parent and have your dreams shattered. We learn about a disease and about how others dealing with similar circumstances can aid one another. We learn about alternative approaches that seem promising. We learn about healing, hope, and faith."
—David Feinberg, from the foreword, MD, MBA
Medical Director, Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA

“Jenny has done an incredible job retelling the story of Evan, who also was forced to make the perilous journey through Autism. Autism is not a dead end diagnosis. It is the beginning of a journey into faith, hope, love, and recovery.”
—Jerry J. Kartzinel, from the introduction, MD FAAP

Review

"Jenny McCarthy takes us on journey of a mom dealing with her son’s Autism diagnosis and treatment. We learn what it is like to be a parent and have your dreams shattered. We learn about a disease and about how others dealing with similar circumstances can aid one another. We learn about alternative approaches that seem promising. We learn about healing, hope, and faith."
—David Feinberg, from the foreword, MD, MBA
Medical Director, Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA

“Jenny has done an incredible job retelling the story of Evan, who also was forced to make the perilous journey through Autism. Autism is not a dead end diagnosis. It is the beginning of a journey into faith, hope, love, and recovery.”
—Jerry J. Kartzinel, from the introduction, MD FAAP

More About the Author

Jenny McCarthy is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Belly Laughs, Baby Laughs, and Louder Than Words, among others. The former host of MTV's hugely popular dating show Singled Out, McCarthy began her career as a Playboy model, before launching a high-profile comedic television and film career. She has been featured everywhere, from Time magazine to the cover of Rolling Stone; has appeared on virtually every television talk show, from Larry King Live to Howard Stern; and is a frequent guest on the Oprah Winfrey Show. She has also served as a spokesperson for Weight Watchers.

In addition to her work in the world of healing and preventing autism, she is the co-creator, with practicing speech/language pathologist Sarah Clifford Scheflen, of Teach2Talk, a series of DVDs for children.

Born in Chicago, McCarthy currently resides in Los Angeles, California, with her son, Evan. You can follow her on Twitter @JennyMcCarthy.

Customer Reviews

The book was a very easy book to read and to understand.
Happy
So the child starts looking your way and you celebrate that by having a look of excitement on your face and saying something like, "Wow, thank you for looking at me!"
Frank and Nicole Seidel
Thank you Jenny McCarthy...now PLEASE use your celebrity to fight for all the children with autism.
Susan Goewey

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

99 of 116 people found the following review helpful By H. Michaelsen on November 23, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I too have a child who has autism and I was disappointed in Jenny's book. If you can get past the swearing (I'm not sure why she has to cheapen her experience with expletives), she definitely writes from her heart. However, as a non-celeb mom trying to find ways to deal with autism and not go bankrupt in the process, I had a hard time identifying with Jenny's journey since she seems to have a lot of money to put towards her son's treatment, and other help like nannies and cleaning ladies and such. Further, Jenny did seem to find a treatment that worked for her son, but I feel that all kids on the spectrum are so different and respond differently to the various treatments out there. She seems to advocate that this is "the only way". I think there are better books out there from a parent dealing with autism. Look at Susan Senator's Making Peace with Autism for starters. I appreciate the awareness Jenny has brought to autism with her TV appearances, but sadly, I thought her book was a little disappointing.
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63 of 74 people found the following review helpful By J.C. on September 24, 2008
Format: Paperback
I am so deeply disappointed by this book that I feel ill. I had purchased the book as a gift for my Mother's birthday hoping she would find comfort in it's pages. My youngest brother was diagnosed with Autism nearly 2 decades ago when very little was known about the disorder. My other brother was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome in the last few years. I was excited at the thought of her finding solace in a good book, unfortunately it will not be found in this one.

I read Jenny's Belly Laughs book even before I was expecting and recommended it to many others. I enjoyed her humor and perspective, how candid she was about her pregnancy. I had hoped that Ms. McCarthy would have brought that same humor and enlightenment to her new circumstances. I have been her cheerleader and called friends when I knew she would be on a talk show. I wanted everyone to hear what she said. I was grateful she was so open and willing to talk about Autism. I couldn't wait to read and share her book. What I found was fact covered in a pile of vulgarity, profanity, tantrums, and narcissism. I was continually amazed at how poorly she treated others from her husband to hospital staff. Even her own father couldn't stay with her because he was blind in one eye (he still had another eye how much could he hinder her!) and she couldn't handle 2 special needs people in her house at that time.

I am thrilled that Ms. McCarthy was able provide the desperately needed services for her son. For those of us in reality we will never have the ability to purchase or muscle our way into the places that can help 'cure' our Autistic loved ones.
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137 of 170 people found the following review helpful By Reggie Dunlop on October 27, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
You can summarize most of the book by "Mommy Instinct" and "Google University".

As a person with a Masters in Biochemistry, it pains me that surfing around on Google now qualifies as "research" worthy of printing in a book. I'm sure the true autism scientists who get up every day painstakingly working toward some answers, must cringe that Jenny McCarthy is now their spokeswoman. I suppose any press is good press, and with media coverage comes grant money... so perhaps Jenny may be helping them out somehow.

As a person who is a now a physician, I think Jenny should understand that the doctors she bashes for the first 50 pages of the book did not go to medical school, and work 90 hours a week during their residency, and incur huge debt, just to come to work and give her bad advice. Doctors are human, and actually do care (especially the new ones), yet they must handle situations as they are taught. True, the outcome (or lack thereof) might be frustrating for a parent... but I wish she would accept that the people at the time were likely trying to do their best... and doctors are not God... they sometimes do not know all the answers for a situation that falls outside of the norm.

As a parent of a four year old with autism, I do feel that Jenny accurately conveyed the joys, frustration, fear, tears, more frustration, confusion, and even more frustration that is associated with a parent's discovery and subsequent acceptance that their child has autism. Herein I think is the value of this book. It may give some insight to friends and families of those with autistic children... what goes on in our homes when we are alone. Her best line was to the effect of... "please offer to babysit for these parents so they can go out to dinner.
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26 of 32 people found the following review helpful By autismreality on September 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I was very disappointed to read this vague, abstract book. As a mother with a severely autistic son, I found it more than difficult to believe her story. In fact, I think it's a case study in deceptive publishing. I would have had more respect for her had she written a book about seizures in children, as that is what her son's primary diagnosis was, and where the etiology of his regression began. That is not true autism. Very misleading book.
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51 of 67 people found the following review helpful By WitchyRN on September 24, 2008
Format: Paperback
That's right folks! I said a story about an "I know everything" bare-my-boobs celebrity. Notice I didn't mention that this book was about a boy's struggle with autism and how a mother "healed" him, because that IS NOT what this book is about. I came across this book when a friend of mine showed it to me saying that she had bought the book to give to her mother. She had never read the book (and I use that term lightly), but she had an adult brother who had been previously diagnosed with autism and thought maybe her mother would be able to relate to the topic. After reading HALF of the book, my friend decided she could not give this book to her mother. After reading it, I can completely understand why. This book is judgemental, offensive, neurotic, and blantantly self-centered.

Where to begin?? I started reading the book with the intention of skimming it. Seventy pages later, I found myself disgusted with what I had read thus far. When I say disgusted, I mean that if Jenny McCarthy were standing right in front of me, I would have hit her over the head with this piece of trash and asked her what the hell she was thinking when she thought she was "the voice of autism". Are you kidding me??

First off, let's evaluate WHO we are getting this story from: a woman who's made her fortune (and I do mean fortune) by exploiting her body and acting like a ditzy blonde (anyone remember MTV's Blind Date?). It makes me sick that she's now making a fortune exploiting her son. A son she seemed to be ashamed of in the beginning. Case in point: after her son was diagnosed with autism, McCarthy went to the bookstore to find books on the subject. Keep in mind she didn't want to ask an employee to direct her to the section because she was "too scared to ask anyone for fear of being recognized".
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