Love, Amalia and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.99
  • Save: $1.80 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: This copy appears to be in nearly new condition. Free State Books. Never settle for less.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Love, Amalia Hardcover – July 10, 2012


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, July 10, 2012
$14.19
$1.50 $0.01
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books


Frequently Bought Together

Love, Amalia + The Chicken Doesn't Skate
Price for both: $19.90

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle FreeTime Unlimited
Free one month trial
Get unlimited access to thousands of kid-safe books, apps and videos, for one low price, with Amazon FreeTime Unlimited. Get started for free. Learn more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 940L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers (July 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1442424028
  • ISBN-13: 978-1442424029
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,787,796 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 3-5-Amalia is upset when her best friend announces that she is moving from Chicago to California. When Martha leaves, Amalia turns to her grandmother for comfort. It is in her kitchen and at her table that the child learns not only about her family and her Mexican heritage, but also about herself. As Abuelita shares her Christmas-card ritual with her granddaughter, Amalia is given glimpses of her aunts and uncles and her mother, and notices the care that Abuelita takes in her communication and responses with everyone. It's quite the the opposite of how Amalia treated Martha at the time of her move. When her grandmother dies suddenly, the child feels lost. Her extended family, whom she has heard so much about, is suddenly around, but instead of making her feel better, she feels worse. Through flashbacks, readers see just how close Amalia was to Abuelita and how much she relied on her for comfort and advice. Over time, with the help of the cherished Christmas-card box, she begins to heal, and by recalling Abuelita's words and deeds, she begins to reach out to her family members, and to Martha as well. This story utilizes a special intergenerational relationship to introduce Mexican culture and traditions within the themes of changing family and friendships. Spanish words and phrases are woven into the text. While it does not break new ground, this quiet story may provide a different perspective on the loss of a loved one.-Stacy Dillon, LREI, New York Cityα(c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Review

“Ada and Zubizarreta (Dancing Home, 2011) reunite to focus on a young Latina girl coping with loss…. The authors tackle issues of love, loss and familial ties with a sympathetic, light hand and blend Spanish words and Latino music and recipes into Amalia’s tale. A charming story, especially for children facing the loss of grandparents.”

Kirkus Reviews, June 1, 2012

“With sensitively drawn characters and a low-key story moving between present and past, the authors construct a portrait of a multigenerational immigrant family. The Latino culture of the family is reflected in the cooking the two do together, the memories Abuelita passes on, and all the letters she has kept from distant loved ones.”

Horn Book Magazine, July/August 2012

“Ada and Zubizaretta’s (Dancing Home)…collaboration focuses on the deep bond between Mexican-American sixth-grader Amalia and her grandmother…. The authors successfully depict family love and closeness across generations and distances…. In the final chapters…the book…takes on an authentic emotional poignancy, bringing a closing richness to this story of a girl’s first experience of loss.”

Publishers Weekly, May 28, 2012

“Amalia is upset when her best friend announces that she is moving from Chicago to California. When Martha leaves, Amalia turns to her grandmother for comfort. It is in her kitchen and at her table that the child learns not only about her family and her Mexican heritage, but also about herself…. This story utilizes a special intergenerational relationship to introduce Mexican culture and traditions within the themes of changing family and friendships. Spanish words and phrases are woven into the text…this quiet story may provide a different perspective on the loss of a loved one.”

School Library Journal, August 2012

“Latina sixth-grader Amalia is so upset by her best friend Martha’s move from their Chicago neighborhood to California that she can’t even say good-bye. When her beloved abuelita passes away suddenly a few days later, she doesn’t even have the chance to say good-bye….Sprinkled with Spanish words and phrases, this quiet story charmingly emphasizes the importance of both friendship and intergenerational relationships. It concludes with simple recipes for making some of Abuelita’s favorite desserts.”

Booklist, August 1, 2012

“A touching portrayal of love and loss…. The emotions ring true, with Amalia’s raw pain of loss and resentment respectfully and vividly depicted.” (The Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books, September 2012)

More About the Author

Alma Flor Ada, Pro­fes­sor Emerita at the Uni­ver­sity of San Fran­cisco, has devoted her life to advo­cacy for peace by pro­mot­ing a ped­a­gogy ori­ented to per­sonal real­iza­tion and social jus­tice. A for­mer Rad­cliffe Scholar at Har­vard Uni­ver­sity and Ful­bright Research Scholar she is an inter­na­tion­ally re-known speaker and the author of numer­ous children's books of poetry, nar­ra­tive, folk­lore and non fic­tion. Her books have received pres­ti­gious awards; among many: Christo­pher Medal (The Gold Coin), Pura Bel­pré Medal (Under the Royal Palms), Once Upon a World (Gath­er­ing the Sun), Par­ents' Choice Honor (Dear Peter Rab­bit), NCSS and CBC Notable Book (My Name is María Isabel). She is also the author of a book of mem­oirs, Vivir en dos idiomas, two nov­els for adults, En clave de sol and A pesar del amor, and sev­eral pro­fes­sional books for edu­ca­tors, includ­ing A Mag­i­cal Encounter: Latino Children's Lit­er­a­ture in the Class­room, as well as a wealth of edu­ca­tional mate­ri­als. Her work, in col­lab­o­ra­tion with F. Isabel Cam­poy in pro­mot­ing author­ship in stu­dents, teach­ers, and par­ents is the con­tent of their book Authors in the Class­room: A Trans­for­ma­tive Edu­ca­tion Process. Alma Flor Ada has been awarded the Amer­i­can Edu­ca­tion Research Asso­ci­a­tion [AERA] His­panic Issues Award for Research in Ele­men­tary, Sec­ondary and Post­sec­ondary Edu­ca­tion and the Cal­i­for­nia Asso­ci­a­tion for Bilin­gual Edu­ca­tion [CABE] Life Long Award.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
Abuelita fills her kitchen with amazing meals, and shares with Amalia her love for cooking and baking.
Stella M Villalba
Love, Amalia is a very thoughtful account of a child that was hurting due to the loss of her beloved grandmother and her best friend that moved away.
Heidi A. Butkus
Love, Amalia is a story of a young Latino girl who is discovering the lessons of loss, friendship and love of family.
broncofan07

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kristi Bernard on October 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Amalia had been going to her grandmothers every Friday since she was very small. Her friend Martha had been going with her since they were in the fourth grade. But now Martha is moving away to California. Her father has a new job and she won't be able to spend time with Amalia any longer. Amalia is sad and hurt by this abrupt news. What will happen to her when Martha leaves?

Amalia remembers the fun that she had with Martha. They would hang out at the park together. They rode bikes on the weekends, visited the library, played soccer and fun word games. Together they shared a lot of interests and learned from each other. Amalia is now left with a feeling of abandonment and anger. Her Grandmother explained to her the value of friendship. She told her the story of how she would write cards and letters to family and friends and the ones she received she would keep. She advised Amalia to consider keeping in touch with Martha by sending her letters.

Grandmother shares a family history and traditions which were woven throughout her lifetime and provided a loving warmth and inspired in Amalia a longing to learn more. But, Amalia experiences more pain, her grandmother passes and she is devastated. Amalia was left a box filled with letters that her grandmother had kept over the years. She learned so much about her family. Now she must decide if whether or not she will follow in her grandmothers footsteps and connect again with Martha.

Alma Flor Ada has created another tremendous story of family and tradition. The Hispanic culture is full of glorious traditions and tasty foods. Young girls will come to love Amalia. A quick fun read, this story and its colorful journey will have young readers wanting to connect with their own families.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Liz Lantigua on October 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Love, Amalia by Alma Flor Ada & Gabriel M. Zubizarreta, is a sweet book for young readers about loss, relationships, and the importance of family. Although, the book is about a Hispanic family in Chicago, young people of all ages and ethnicities can identify with this story. Great for Book Clubs! Kids can discuss the book while savoring one of the deserts prepared with the recipes included. This book is sweet in more ways than one!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joan Schoettler on September 13, 2012
Format: Hardcover
In Love, Amalia, Alma Flor Ada invites us into a well-crafted world of a young girl struggling with the double loss of her best friend and of her grandmother, internal strife, and growing up, all the while, learning through fine examples, family support, and tender love how to overcome difficult situations in life. The influence of family, love, and patience weave through chapters like a tightly woven blanket. The story unfolds within a rich Hispanic setting where the demonstration of the importance of family, preparation and sharing of meals, and retelling of stories is integral. Amalia's relationship to her grandmother develops on Friday afternoon visits, over cakes and cookies baked together, and through conversations across the dining room table. Abuelita's unwavering love, even when Amalia shares her deepest secret of stealing, presents a strong and powerful example of integrity, honesty, and support. One of the greatest gifts Abuelita left was showing Amalia how important it is to let others know how special they are and how much they mean to you. Abuelita's treasured box of family cards, a unique tool to share backstory and demonstrate the power of words, reveals the importance of people in Abuelita's life. Amalia holds firmly to Abuelita's final words to her. "You will find a way to stay close to Martha." Amalia's letter to Martha on the last page reveals Amalia's growth as she reaches out to her friend.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By broncofan07 on August 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Love, Amalia is a story of a young Latino girl who is discovering the lessons of loss, friendship and love of family. When this delightful book begins, Amalia is facing a problem with her best friend and shares it with her grandmother. The tender bond and relationship that exists between Amalia and her grandmother is one she will soon understand as she embarks on a journey of self-discovery within life and within herself.

The authors, who write from their hearts, do an exceptional job of creating a story that will help parents and caregivers approach the subject of grief and loss with all children. Love, Amalia will also teach the valuable lesson of why people are important and, most importantly, why we ourselves are truly special.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?