Love, Christopher Street and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Trade in your item
Get a $0.47
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Love, Christopher Street: Reflections of New York City Paperback – June 1, 2012


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, June 1, 2012
$97.70 $14.90

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 422 pages
  • Publisher: Vantage Point (June 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936467348
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936467341
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 5.9 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,826,547 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"By turns funny, outrageous, poignant, uplifting, incendiary--you name it, it's here. The scope is sweeping, but editor Thomas Keith has done a brilliant job... No matter what your relationship is with New York City, you're bound to find something here to make you smile, laugh or be homesick."
--Jerry Wheeler, Out in Print

About the Author

Thomas Keith has edited over a dozen titles by Tennessee Williams including, Mister Paradise and Other One-Act Plays, The Traveling Companion & Other Plays, The Magic Tower & Other One-Act Plays as well as Williams’s last full-length play, A House Not Meant to Stand, for which he also wrote the introduction. Keith is the co-author of The Histories of Gladys and The Collector’s Guide to Mauchline Ware, the editor of Robert Burns Selected Poems and Songs and the anthology Christmas Poems, the co-editor of The Selected Letters of Tennessee Williams and James Laughlin, and has written articles and chapters for American Theatre Magazine, The Drouth, Studies in Scottish Literature, Fickle Man: Burns in the 21st Century, Tenn at One Hundred, The Tennessee Williams Encyclopedia, and Robert Burns in North America, among others.


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 9, 2012
Format: Paperback
Thomas Keith is the editor and commentator responsible for this outstanding collection of essays by some brilliant writers who have shared their various experiences with living in New York City. Keith himself has lived in the Lower East Side since 1985 and has observed the changes since Stonewall in the activity and maturation of the LGBT population whose center of notoriety has moved form Christopher Street to Chelsea. But this is not a history of Christopher Street, as the title might suggest, but instead this is a collection of love letters from LGBT writers whose vantages are from the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island and whose essays cover the gamut from hilarious to probing and each of the essays Keith has selected is top notch writing.

While there isn't a weak story among the twenty six stories collected here, to sample the differences would be to highlight the story by Vietnamese immigrant Ocean Vuong who details his choice to move to New York to become a writer and finds himself living among the homeless in Penn Station and the influence that had on his subsequent poetry and work. Or there is an hilarious story by Justine Saracen about how as an opera lover she discovers the trouser roles sung by mezzo-sopranos and her obsession to meet the mezzo who plays Octavian in Der Rosenkavalier - one of the famous trio of women who fall in love with each other.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Finnegan on June 24, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is the kind of volume I find it nearly impossible to put down. Each contribution has its own distinctive themes and rhythms. Favorites of mine are Bob Smith's very moving essay on living with ALS,the pseudonymous Justine Saracen's operatic piece on mezzos and pants roles, Penny Arcade's personal perspective on the evolution of the Village and the community, and Brendan Fay's treatise on immigrating to New York from Ireland and finding Jesus (that's Hay-Soos to you!) in the late lamented Oscar Wilde Bookstore. This volume is not limited to views only of the Village or Christopher Street. All boroughs are represented, as is the entire the tri-state area.
Joy, sadness, nostalgia, anger, disenchantment, desire: a whole world of experience flows through these pages. Highly recommended to anyone and everyone, gay or straight, who loves or hates or is simply intrigued by New York City.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Elisa on December 3, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This was a compelling reading. It’s not my first book with a real-life New York setting, if you want to consider your e-reader the modern bedside table, I have Gay New York and Gay Metropolis on my shortlist, plus Eminent Outlaws, another nonfiction I love, is mostly set in this same city, but Love, Christopher Street shift the perspective to more contemporary times, mostly of these stories are about the ’70-’80-’90, pre and post AIDS, with everything it implied. So this was a nice addition to my collection, and another reason to browse some authors I wasn’t aware of. I raise my hand, there are some friends among the contributors: Christopher Bram, Aaron Hamburger, Fay Jacobs, Shaun Levin, Felice Picano and Justine Saracen; I was already aware of the fiction and nonfiction by them, as I said Bram’s Eminent Outlaws is one of my reference texts, and so it’s True Stories by Felice Picano. Moreover there are authors I don’t personally know but admire, Thomas Glave, Jewelle Gomez, Charles Rice-Gonzalez (I was even to a reading of Mr Rice-Gonzalez, his puppy stole the scene at that one) and Bob Smith. For all the other it was a wonderful chance to “meet” them, and I’m sure this will be not the last time I will enjoy their experience.

What is probably the most important thing is that these women and men are not hiding anything to the reader, nor happiness or sadness, nor fears or hopes. There is love and death, mourning and joy, blood families and those built to substitute the ones who didn’t want you (and sometime they are stronger and more important than those made of relatives.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By twp77 on October 12, 2012
Format: Paperback
Love, Christopher Street is an excellent collection of essays from a variety of LGBT New Yorkers. Its strength lies in the inclusion of multiple LGBT voices from a variety of ethnic and religious backgrounds. Overall it paints a real, moving and eminently readable portrait of New York's LGBT community past and present. Whether one is a part of this community or merely an outside observer, Love, Christopher Street is one of those books that will leaving you thinking - and feeling for days and months after you've put it down. An excellent read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search