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Love Cry


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Product Details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: Impulse
  • ASIN: B001GAGH82
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,302,578 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Michael Stack VINE VOICE on September 15, 2005
Format: Audio CD
"Love Cry" is an album that is often spoken poorly of as the beginning of the end for Albert Ayler, the point where he started selling out, take your pick. Such accusations are a bit baseless-- the album, recored in two sessions in 1967, is in many ways a reflection of part of Ayler's live shows. The band, consisting of Ayler on tenor and occasionally alto sax, Don Ayler on trumpet (on roughly half the pieces), Call Cobbs on harpsichord (on about half the tracks), and a rhythm section of Alan Silva on bass and Milford Graves on drums, does basic performances of several favorite AYler themes and a few new pieces-- the themes are performed relatively straight with improvisation being predominantly playing in and around the theme from the horns (with a couple exceptions), while the rhythm section freely associates with the leader.

Admittedly, there's very little of that fierce improv that Ayler made his reputation on, but that makes the music no less valid (nor no more commercial), and in fact, while Ayler subtlely twists and turns about his melodies, with either his brother or Cobbs providing counterpoint or framing, the rhythm section is fiercely inventive. Alan Silva, for his part, is probably the best match on bass for Ayler since the early days of Gary Peacock-- not content to play simple counter or rhythm fixture to Ayler, Silva finds ways to engage in constant dialog. Likewise Graves proves a far more engaging fit for Ayler than Beaver Harris, who had played with him for the better part of the previous year-- Graves puts forth techniques and styles totally unique, finding homes and holes throughout the themes and always remaining engaging in the dialog.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Gary Gomes on July 27, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Around a period of about 6 months between the summer of 1971 and winter of 1971 I encountered free jazz in some of its most extreme forms. I actually purchased this recording around Christmas time of 1971.
The sheer power and enthusiasm in thius recording are incredible. I would consider this group (with bassist Alan Silva and drummer Milford Graves) to be Ayler's best and most radical group. All of the players have unique voices, and the catchiness of some of the pieces are that rare thing -- hummable free jazz!
All the players are extraordinary, but I would mention Graves as a special standout. This is a rare chance to hear one of the greatest innovators in drumming in top form. Unfortunately, he abandoned this style of playing in favor of one that was closer to the great Andrew Cyrille's style, but it would have been fascinating to hear how much further he could have gone with this style.
The compositions and arrangements are incredible adventurous too! Just listen to the "skipped" notes by Albert Ayler in Ghosts and other pieces. Amazing!
In short, an essential free jazz recording, and a recording that changed my life, just in terms of what it was possible to do in music.
Gary Gomes
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Dave Stagner on February 3, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Lots of free jazz is great music, but very much an aquired taste. Very little of it makes any sense or brings any pleasure to anyone but the cognescenti who are already into it. This album is an exception - the melodies and arrangements are simple, even catchy, but the rhythms and improvisations are phenomenally deep. You can play this for your square friends and they'll laugh out loud, like they would for, say, really great New Orleans marching-band jazz.
Although all the players are wonderful, drummer Milford Graves in particular stands out. His rolling, childlike pulse here is as far beyond the post-bop stylings of Tony Williams and Elvin Jones as those masters were beyond the swing of Jo Jones and Gene Krupa. It was the future of jazz then, and it's still the future now!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jessamine on January 21, 2009
Format: Audio CD
The album is melodic, rhythmic, chaotic, loose, shocking, emotional, and inspiring. The sound is strange, particularly the tracks where Cal Cobbs plays harpsicord. The harpsichord lends an antique and disjointed sort of feel, like the music is somehow dated and old, yet everything else, particularly Albert's sax and his brother Don's trumpet, screams that this is something new at least during the second half of the album. The album begins with the title track, which harkens to reveille, and it is followed by a series of loose marchs that speed up and slow down at whim, and provide a springboard for very short improvisations. The first six tracks were all recorded at a session in August of 1967, and they all have a very similar feel. I find myself joyfully humming along during the these tracks.

However, the second half of the album is where the real magic happens. These tracks (which include several alternate takes not on the original LP) were all recorded in February of 1968, and feature more extended improvisation and emotion, and Albert's sax is his ragged best - screaming, crying, and and splashing sounds like paint on a canvas. Donald's trumpet is repetitive and hypnotic.

Alan Silva on bass and Milford Graves on drums propel these schizophrenic and swirling marches along, and during the second half of the album provide the Ayler brothers with a template for unbridled improvisation. This is a unique and beautiful album, under-appreciated by many, including some Ayler fans. However, I find it impossible not to get swept up in the these marching medleys and melodies - grinning, screaming and crying all the way.
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