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I Love Dick (Semiotext(e) / Native Agents) Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: Semiotext(e) / Native Agents
  • Paperback: 279 pages
  • Publisher: Semiotext(e) (July 14, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1584350342
  • ISBN-13: 978-1584350347
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,821 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A clever, finely crafted crossover between life, love and cultural studies." -- Peter Beilharz, The Australian



"A little masterpiece of late twenieth century literature." East Hampton Star



"Devastatingly funny and sublime... a new classic." The Seattle Stranger



"Ever since I read I Love Dick, I have revered it as one of the most explosive, revealing, lacerating, and unusual memoirs ever committed to the page... I Love Dick is never a comfortable read, and it is by turns exasperating, horrifying, and lurid, but it is never less than genuine, and often completely illuminating about the life of the mind." Rick Moody Post Road



"Tart, brazen and funny... a cautionary tale, I Love Dick raises disturbing but compelling questions about female social behavior, power, control." The Nation



"The biggest art revelation of the year." The New Zealand Listener



"Unexpectedly riveting." BookForum

About the Author

The author of four novels, the most recent of which is Summer of Hate, and two books of criticism, Chris Kraus was recently described by the New York Observer as "the art world's favorite fiction writer." She teaches at European Graduate School and lives in Los Angeles.

Eileen Myles, named by BUST magazine "the rock star of modern poetry," is the author of more than twenty books of poetry and prose, including Chelsea Girls, Cool for You, Sorry, Tree, and Not Me (Semiotext(e), 1991), and is the coeditor of The New Fuck You (Semiotext(e), 1995). Myles was head of the writing program at University of California, San Diego, from 2002 to 2007, and she has written extensively on art and writing and the cultural scene. Most recently, she received a fellowship from the Andy Warhol/Creative Capital Foundation.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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I didn't like the characters.
LA
Reading this was PAINFUL, but I managed to get 2/3 of the way through it before I couldn't take it anymore.
LS
I promised myself I would attempt 100 pages becauseI was reading it for a book club.
Keri

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 26, 1998
Format: Paperback
Although it bogs down some in the middle, overall this is a fascinating/infuriating/perplexing/upsetting view into Chris Kraus's mind. The books worked least for me when Kraus's sense of inferiority was most palpable, because then she comes across most (as one of the other reviewers points out) as a desperate, pathetic woman who you really don't want to be reading about, but on the whole, i found it a deeply engaging, well-written, very honest look at the not very uncommon phenomena of obsession and fastasy.
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26 of 33 people found the following review helpful By brigid.shadbolt@excite.com on January 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
This intriguingly titled volume is authored by Chris Kraus, a New Zealand-born alternative film-maker and teacher, now based in LA and New York. Married to Sylvere Lottringer, progenitor of the Semiotext(e) publishing house and cult intellectual, Kraus is concerned to prove that she has a fierce intellect of her own. Obviously a fan of experimentation, Kraus has produced a book which consists of a pastiche of letters, old art reviews, travelogues, essays and philosophical pronouncements. I Love Dick begins with a crush and develops into a full-scale reworking of the epistolary novel. Ostensibly, the narrative arises from Kraus' pursuit of her husband's academic colleague named Dick. With her husband's somewhat hesitant blessing, Kraus constructs this affair then views it as a text and attempts deconstruction. This story of manufactured desire also delivers a vivid portrait of Kraus' life to date. This involves intimate insights into her chequered past including descriptions of her Crohns disease and anorexia as well as providing glimpses of various sexual encounters, public humiliations and minor triumphs. In fact, much of the book is devoted to the project of reclaiming her past and making sense of it. She says she aims to 'avenge the ghost of her former self' by putting down the 'dirty, murky and complex' elements of her experience in writing. I Love Dick attempts the near impossible task of dealing with dumb infatuation in a brilliantly self-reflexive way. For Kraus, Dick is an object of affection, a sounding-board, a symptom of malaise and despite his indifference to her advances, a solution of sorts.Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By cfrields@pacbell.net on June 29, 1998
Format: Paperback
I Love Dick is a terrific ride - order it, read it and pass it along to your best girl or guy friend, leave it on a train or plane or your doctor's office. This is a road story criss-crossing the terrain of academia, art, sex and love (and much , much more!) at 70 miles per hour.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Grainger on May 7, 1998
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is my favorite book of 1997. It deconstructs the romance narrative to which we are accustomed, and does so with great wit, intellectual acumen, and artistic vision. Kraus' book reads as a performance piece/treatise on love/feminist theory, as well as a (slightly screwy) novel.
_I Love Dick_ is intellectually and emotionally provocative. I highly reccomend this book to anyone interested in thinking rather than simply being passively 'entertained.' Oh, and the cover photo is a work of art, too.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 30, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is a brilliant book. Like Proust, it is a narrative of the writer's sexual pursuit of a vacant love object, the pursuit of which is primarily to enable the writer to dwell on her emotions during the pursuit. Second, it is a commentary on the the connection between failure in the market-place and society's belief that such failure justifies debasement ("we hate your movie"). By making the hippest, most Marxist segment of society-- cutting edge academia and avant garde artists -- the upholders of market values is genius. Thrillingly, but incompletely, it seeks to indict society for diagnosing physical ugliness and economic failure as mental illness. Lastly, and of least interest, it seeks to establish a roster of unknown elites -- David Rattray, Alice Notley , Liza Martin , Ann Rover-- who will someday be the subject of intnese academic study by the Dicks of our children's generation. You'll hate Dick, but love Chris Kraus.w
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 26, 1999
Format: Paperback
Okay, it's not a perfect book. It's scary and self-indulgent and could have been trimmed. Yet ... it sticks with me like few things I've read this year. I heard it set off a firestorm n the art world, and I can see why. It's rare to see female anger come out so real, so raw. I bet most men hate this book.
There's a party scene in this book that is the most honest thing I've ever read about female humiliation -- always being the "plus one" of some guy, or ignored for the prettier girls.
I think it's a little too real and that scares people (men and women alike).
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By The Art Book Review on December 22, 2013
Format: Paperback
" The book itself functions in a similar way to 70s early video art in which the performer would perform only to the camera in isolation, but aware of a potential future viewer. Does that character of Dick actually matter or could his character be replaced by anyone? Are we Dick?"
--Paul Pescador on Chris Kraus' "I Love Dick"

Part of his series of reviews titled "The Women"

Read them all here:
[...]
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Natutanatuta on August 27, 2013
Format: Paperback
I loved the book thats why i bought one for me and one for my friend! We both enjoyed it!
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