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I Love My Hair! Paperback – September 1, 2001


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I Love My Hair! + Big Hair, Don't Care + I'm a Pretty Little Black Girl! (I'm a Girl! Collection)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 6 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 1
  • Lexile Measure: 900L (What's this?)
  • Paperback: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (September 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316523755
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316523752
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 0.1 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (144 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,729 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"In this gracefully told story, a young African-American heroine celebrates her lovely head of hair as part of her heritage," wrote PW. Ages 3-8.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 2?A young African-American girl describes the familiar mother-daughter nightly ritual of combing the tangles out of her hair. When she cries because it hurts, her sympathetic mother tells her how lucky she is to have such beautiful hair. Imaginatively, the woman goes on to say that she can spin it into a fine, soft bun or "plant rows of braids" along her scalp, prompting her daughter to think of other wonderful things she likes about her hair. The superb watercolor illustrations move from the intimacy and security of Keyana's bedroom to the neighborhood streets and finally to the whole world as her mother's imagery becomes reflected in the art. Keyana's hair is spun on a spinning wheel, becomes part of rows of plants in a garden, and merges with a globe of the whole world. The child's favorite style, however, is two ponytails that flap like wings on each side of her head, and the final picture is of Keyana triumphantly flying free against the blue sky. Pictures and text reflect the expanding horizons of the child's world as she learns to be proud of her distinctive hair and her heritage. Carolivia Herron's Nappy Hair (Knopf, 1997) and Alexis De Veaux's The Enchanted Hair Tale (HarperCollins, 1991) treat the same subject well, but this book has a simpler text that can be used both as a read-aloud to a group or on a mother's lap. A very special book about self-acceptance.?Judith Constantinides, East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library,
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Natasha Anastasia Tarpley is the author of the best-selling picture book I Love My Hair!, Princess Tiana and the Royal Ball, and other acclaimed titles for children and adults. Her children's books are on the recommended-reading lists of school and library systems worldwide. A former reporter for Fortune magazine, she is the recipient of numerous awards, including a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship. Ms. Tarpley is the founder of Voonderbar! Productions, LLC, a multimedia children's entertainment company. She lives in Chicago, Illinois.

Customer Reviews

Beautifully illustrated watercolor paintings.
Christina
This book promote the messages of accepting and loving one's self and accepting other peoples differences.
Johnston Carmel
I bought this book for my 2 year old daughter and I know she will love this book for years to come.
kristi

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

71 of 73 people found the following review helpful By Johnston Carmel on December 1, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Roethler, Jacque. "Reading in Color: Children's Book Illustrations and Identity Formation for Black Children in the United States." African America Review 32.1 (1998): 95-104. Tarpley, Natasha Anastasia. I Love My Hair. Illus. E. B. Lewis. Canada: Little, Brown and Company 1998. In I Love My Hair, the author reflects on a little girl's experience of her mother fixing her hair. Although Keyana's experience of getting her hair fixed is not always pleasant, the outcome is always pleasing. While Keyana's mother fixes her hair, she tells Keyana how beautiful her hair is and that she is lucky to have the kind of hair that she does. Once when Keyana's mother fixes her hair in an afro, the kids at school teased her, but then her teacher told her that she should be proud of her hair and that the afro style is a statement of pride in her African heritage. Through her mother's and her teacher's encouragement, Keyana learns to appreciate and love her hair as well as herself. I like this book for various reasons. First the main character is Afro-American. During my childhood, I was not exposed to books in which the main characters and illustrations reflected African American culture and values. The beginning of I Love My Hair depicts a situation that is so familiar among African American communities: Keyana sits between her mother's legs, squeezing her eyes together as her mother combs her hair. I became nostalgic while I read that page. I believe that literature containing African Americans as central characters is vital for African American children. This view is also shared by Jacque Roethler who, in her article "Reading in Color: Children's Book Illustrations and Identity Formation for Black Children in the United States" declares that children are sensitive to illustrations.Read more ›
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64 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Demeter on February 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
As the cacausian mother of an African-American daughter, I am grateful for this book. My daughter hates having her hair combed. She has always cried and begged me not to do it. So I bought this book. Now she looks at the pictures and reads about Keyana and her hair while I comb through her own. It not only gives her something to do, but she doesn't feel singled out any more! Thank you to the makers of this title.
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Mazza HALL OF FAME on November 20, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Natasha Anastasia Tarpley's "I Love My Hair!" is a children's book that combines an easy-to-read text with colorful illustrations by E.B. Lewis. The text represents the first-person reflections of a little Black girl named Keyana. After describing the hair care ritual she goes through with her mother, Keyana reflects on the different styles in which she can wear her hair: cornrows, an Afro, a bun, etc.
The appealing illustrations blend fantasy and reality as Keyana thinks about each hairstyle. For example, her two ponytails become wings that allow her to fly. The text is also fun. Sample line: "I love my hair because it is thick as a forest, soft as cotton candy. . ." This is an especially empowering book for Black girls, but the imaginative elements in the book also make it good for a broader audience.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By bibliophil29 on July 29, 2002
Format: Hardcover
"I Love My Hair" by N.A Tarpley is a lovely book for children about self-acceptance. The story effectivly portrays a positive side of African American culture that is often ridiculed - Black hair. Through internalized racisim and negative media images the ugly seeds of self-hatred and shame often take root in many young African American children. These negative images about their Afrocentricity often lasts far into adulthood. Tarpley did a wonderful job reversing such negative images. Kudos to E.B. Lewis! His creative artistic talents tell a story about African American idenity, beauty and acceptance. His illustrations stood alone in successully describing the story just as effectivly as the author's words. My daughter was elated when I presented this book to her. Imediately upon viewing the illustration of the little brown skinned girl with braided hair on the cover of the book, she looked up at me with joy in her eyes and a smile on her face and said, "Oh, Mommy she looks just like me!"
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By BeatleBangs1964 VINE VOICE on October 17, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The narrator of this tale is a bright, beautiful little girl who is proud of her naturally thick curly Black hair. She, like most folks find combout sessions quite painful, but her very wise mother tells her why she is lucky to have such beautiful, thick, naturally curly hair.
Keyana, the child narrator describes the care her hair requires; her mother rubs coconut oil into her scalp to help the comb glide through it. Her mother applies rich poetic descriptions to Keyana's hair; she tells Keyana every time she corn rows it, it is like planting a beautiful garden; when she combs it out into a big, beautiful Afro, it is a globe as round as the world that contains everybody; she tells Keyana she can spin it like silk the way their ancestors spun silk on a loom. Each description is accompanied by a lovely picture showing the mother's vision; for example, when she applies the silk comparison, Keyana is drawn with her beautiful hair being spun on a loom.
Keyana herself celebrates her natural beauty, hair and all and takes pride in the myriad of hairstyles her thick, curly hair will allow her to try. I like the way she said that the hair styling sessions were a time of mother-daughter bonding and the illustrations are first rate.
This is a book all parents and educators will want to use to promote self pride among all children, particularly children who are black. This book celebrates the beauty of being human. It is for everybody. I love this book!
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