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39 Reviews
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Loved it, didn't hate it
If he's not more careful, Jeff Pearlman's going to get a reputation as the Kitty Kelley of baseball. First, the John Rocker interview in "Sports Illustrated". Next, "The Bad Guys Won!" -- a book about the hard-drinkin', coke-snortin' '86 Mets. Now, Barry Bonds is revealed in all his misanthropic, beef 'roid injectin' misery.

I'm not sure if "Love Me, Hate...
Published on May 1, 2006 by Jason A. Miller

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Save Your Money...Unless You Hate Barry Too
If you don't like Barry Bonds, you will love this book. I happen to like him and didn't like how he was portrayed at all. Barry is the greatest baseball player I have ever seen, with or without performance enhancing assistance. I will admit he may not be the nicest guy in the world, but at least he is real. Far too many athletes today kiss up to the media in hopes that...
Published 5 months ago by Fontana


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best sports themed books out there!, March 27, 2009
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The author, Jeff Pearlman, did his homework on this tour-de-force. I'm a GIANTS FAN, so I take exception to jabs thrown at my hometown's hero. But this book is sooo well written, it's hard to not begin to see Barry in a different eye. But whatever. He's hell to handle, but dude was/is/forever will be a MONSTER HITTER and the greatest of this generation, steroids or not. The 'roids don't help you make contact.. if so, all those drug using ballplayers would have smashed records previously owned by the baseball immortals. But this book shows that Bonds is a catalytic force. His physical achievements will be forever challenged and his reputation did him more harm than good. But all in all, an excellent portrayal of a Bonds I never knew existed, and I've lived in San Francisco my entire life. Great great book.

Also, quick, the seller rocks. Sent it quick and in excellent condition.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars my new favorite, April 24, 2006
By 
Ari (Danville, Illinois) - See all my reviews
I loved this book in a way I love few biographies. It is just a fascinating story about a misunderstood baseball player. I read "The Bad Guys Won" and thought it was too silly and, often, stupid. But this time the author hits a home run. It's an excellent biography, and not just as a sports book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What the fuss was about, December 17, 2011
By 
WDX2BB (New York State) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Love Me, Hate Me: Barry Bonds and the Making of an Antihero (Paperback)
A complicated man, this Barry Bonds.

A man who wasn't satisfied with merely being the best all-around player in baseball. He wanted more, in the form of slugging immortality.

A man who often treats people badly, yet only respects (some of) those who stand up to him.

A man who can be rude at one moment, kind and generous a few moments later.

That's the man profiled in Jeff Pearlman's biography, "Love Me, Hate Me." Relatively current athletes often don't have enough history to make for an interesting book, but Bonds certainly is the exception to the rule.

This is something of a psychological study. Bonds is the son of Bobby Bonds, the former major leaguer who had a ton of natural talent and who for a while was considered the next Willie Mays. That's some heavy emotional baggage for anyone, and Bobby didn't handle it well, turning to alcohol for relief.

Speaking of emotional baggage, it's never easy to be the son of a major celebrity, especially one as gifted as Barry and who was headed into the same career. He was spoiled in many ways growing up, but he never knew who his true friends were. In fact, he still may not.

Pearlman talked with more than 500 people who had stories to tell about Bonds. The contradictions about him have gone on for years. Some of the best stories center on his high school and college days, where he knew he could get away with the proverbial murder ... and did. It's easy to guess that people needed to stand up to him then, but didn't ... which led to a major leaguer who thought the usual rules never applied to him.

The author goes through Bonds' life year by year, including his stop with the Pittsburgh Pirates before arriving in San Francisco. There Bonds put together much of his Hall of Fame-level career. There are stories of astonishing accomplishments, albeit mixed with rude behavior. Yet Pearlman reports that Bonds was jealous of Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa for their 1998 run at the home run record ... and Bonds decided he needed to join them. So Bonds allegedly turned to chemical help in the form of steroid.

In the end, Bonds becomes a pathetic figure in a way. Yes, he has fame and more money than he can spend. Yet he's somewhat trapped in a lie about his use of steroids. He caught Hank Aaron for the all-time home run record, but did it while being convicted of obstruction of justice.

Pearlman talked to so many people that the book feels a little "overstuffed" at times. But it still is amazing that so many people were willing to go on the record to talk about one man's bad behavior.

"Love Me, Hate Me" was somewhat overlooked when it was released, as "Game of Shadows" received most of the attention for its bombshell story about steroid use. Pearlman's book deserves a bit more attention. It's as close to a good look at this enigmatic star as we're likely to get.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Superb Book About A Genuine Superstar and a Real Jerk, June 18, 2010
I'd like to start with the only part of this book I wholeheartedly disagreed with: the derisive comparision of Bonds to superstars in other sports when talking about the Giants' epic end-of-World Series failure in 2002 specifically and the notion that Bonds didn't "lift" his teammates to greater performances in general. Say what you will about Barry Bonds, but the teams he was on won a lot more with him than without him, and honestly baseball is the kind of game where you can't simply carry a team as a position player in the way that someone in basketball or football can. The only exception to that on a consistent basis has come from starting pitchers, and I'm quite certain Jeff Pearlman isn't taking Bonds to task for never trying to become one of those!
Having said that, this is simply a superb book. I didn't want to even riff through it at B&N because what I knew about Barry Bonds was either A) material that'd already come out in other outlets or B) enough to make me sure that knowing more about such a jackass would be unbearable. Yet this book is the furthest thing from a chore to read; it has smarts, good anecdotes, fairness, a sense of time and place, and it moves like lightning. You might not like Barry Bonds more at the book's end than you did at the beginning, as I didn't, but you might be able to logically comprehend WHY he is the way he is: the genuine superstar, and the real jerk. This work surges on the weight of truth, and if you are a fan of baseball and/or recent American history, it's a must-read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting read, July 10, 2007
By 
Amazon Customer (New Jersey United States) - See all my reviews
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This is quite simply one of the best sports biographies I have ever read. It is written in a very readable and interesting manner. Very highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Save Your Money...Unless You Hate Barry Too, July 28, 2014
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If you don't like Barry Bonds, you will love this book. I happen to like him and didn't like how he was portrayed at all. Barry is the greatest baseball player I have ever seen, with or without performance enhancing assistance. I will admit he may not be the nicest guy in the world, but at least he is real. Far too many athletes today kiss up to the media in hopes that the media will like them and write positive things. Barry didn't care what you wrote about him, so he didn't kiss up. So now these same scribes will keep him out of the Hall of Fame as a way to show him. Without Barry Bonds in the Hall of Fame, you might as well not have one. Look at his stats and compare them to anyone. From the title of the book, it seems like you will get both sides of his story, but it is almost all negative. I had hoped for better.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Kitty Kelly, Sports Division, April 3, 2013
By 
D. B. Rosett (Guadalajara, Mexico) - See all my reviews
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This is a tough book about someone who pathologically invites such treatment. His defensive contempt of nearly everyone he came in contact with as a player is quite sad, as much as if not more than his absurd need to gild the lilly of what is otherwise a brilliant baseball career by cheating with steroids.

That said, Pearlman clearly enjoys writing this kind of biography, and that should give one pause. The Kitty Kelly of the baseball world (he has also published a book revealing the stinky qualities of the great 1986 N.Y. Mets team) couldn't wait until Bonds's career was over to publish his sordid tale. No, in fact, Pearlman couldn't wait until Bonds actually broke the homerun record, so as to delegitimize it even before the event occured. .
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars an ax to grind?, September 6, 2012
Sounds like to me this 'author" has a personal vendetta against Mr Bonds. It felt like I was reading a tabloid. While he certainly is entitled to write a book that doesn't mean he should. And to top it off he never once talked Bonds himself.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding!, April 27, 2006
Outstanding book, loved it. Considering how huge Bonds is, it's surprising there hasn't been more books about his life. This seems to be the first one to really get inside and give a true picture of who he is. It's a fascinating read in that the author kind of gives you a front row seat from birth to age 41 on how a prima donna (or pick your adjective) is made, so it goes well beyond being just another baseball book. Plus there's a great balance between the baseball/on the field passages and the behind-the-scenes stories of how big a jerk Barry can be to the people around him.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I knew Barry Bonds, April 21, 2006
By 
Sun Devil (Flagstaff, Arizona) - See all my reviews
We went to Arizona State University together. He played baseball when I was working as a scorekeeper. I will always remember how not nice he was to many of us. It's not that he was the only jerk on the team (these were baseball players, after all), but he always reminded us that we were smaller than he was. So I have to say, Pearlman's book captures this 100%. The way he still treats peiple brings me back to my college years. Pearlman nailed the attitude and sense of entitlement. Thank God someone else feels the way I did.
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Love Me, Hate Me: Barry Bonds and the Making of an Antihero
Love Me, Hate Me: Barry Bonds and the Making of an Antihero by Jeff Pearlman (Paperback - February 20, 2007)
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