Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy New
$10.05
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $4.94 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
I Love Yous Are for White... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

I Love Yous Are for White People: A Memoir Paperback – May 12, 2009

4.4 out of 5 stars 74 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.05
$5.83 $0.01

Must-read biographies
A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius
A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius
A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius
$10.05 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • I Love Yous Are for White People: A Memoir
  • +
  • Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People
  • +
  • Asian American Studies Now: A Critical Reader
Total price: $58.79
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

Moving. . . . Anyone who wonders what obstacles an immigrant must overcome will be fascinated by this assimilation story; Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior complements it nicely. (Library Journal)

About the Author

Lac Su received a master's degree and Ph.D., A.B.D., in industrial-organizational psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology. He is vice president of marketing for TalentSmart, a global think tank and management consulting firm, and he lives in San Diego with his wife and three kids.

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 79%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.
For thousands of qualifying books, your past, present, and future print-edition purchases now lets you buy the Kindle edition for $2.99 or less. (Textbooks available for $9.99 or less.)
  • Thousands of books are eligible, including current and former best sellers.
  • Look for the Kindle MatchBook icon on print and Kindle book detail pages of qualifying books. You can also see more Kindle MatchBook titles here or look up all of your Kindle MatchBook titles here.
  • Read the Kindle edition on any Kindle device or with a free Kindle Reading App.
  • Print edition must be purchased new and sold by Amazon.com.
  • Gifting of the Kindle edition at the Kindle MatchBook price is not available.
Learn more about Kindle MatchBook.


Image
Interested in the Audiobook Edition?
If you’re the author, publisher, or rights holder of this book, let ACX help you produce the audiobook.Learn more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; 1 Original edition (May 12, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061543667
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061543661
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (74 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #253,915 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
What impressed me most about this book is how even as a middle-class, white, small town midwesterner with a cynical bent, I so deeply related to the plight of a Vietnamese refugee family plunked down into the ghetto of inner-city L.A.

Beginning with his family's harrowing escape from Communist Vietnam amidst a backdrop of gunfire and grenade explosion into an ill-equipped fishing boat that nearly sinks under heavy Pacific storms, the story truly begins with a bang. After being rescued at the very last moment by a reluctant Hong Kong military crew, Su and his family eventually make their way to the "Promiseland" in the ghettos of L.A.

With just the right amount of description--never revealing too much to put the reader at an all-knowing distance, nor too little to prevent you from truly feeling what Su felt in each moment--the writing made me feel as though I was the author's shadow. I saw what he saw and experienced what he experienced--from his adolescent stealing and subsequent selling of his parent's food stamps in order to feed a bullying peer's video game habit in the desperate hope of being accepted, all the way to the cold feeling of a gun barrel jammed into my cheek.

Perhaps the most interesting character is Su's father. He is a dejected shell of a man struggling with the loss of his position as a respect-commanding figure in Vietnam to a veritable Nobody in the U.S. Not knowing the language or the customs and without any formal education (he himself was orphaned and left to fend for himself as a hustler on the streets of Da Nang as an adolescent), he desperately clings to his dignity as we slowly and tragically watch it slip away.
Read more ›
3 Comments 131 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lac Su's heartfelt memoir, I Love Yous Are for White People, could not be more timely. This book is about the difficulties a first-generation Vietnamese-Chinese child who comes to America as a refugee faces. Lac Su is forthright about the obstacles: poverty, difficulty learning a new culture and language, violence, bullying at home and at school, the allure of gangs in order to fit in, the allure of crime for seemingly "easy" money. Yet this story is a triumph--despite the truly horrific experiences that Lac Su describes, he has grown into a well-adjusted, successful, loving father, husband, entrepreneur and writer. I wish this book were available in all American high schools. It could really help kids who feel they are alone because of their perceived differences, and it shows them that they can overcome the violence and misunderstanding that they may face in the present.
Some of the most heart-breaking passages involve the great violence that Lac Su's own father inflicts upon his son (and Lac's mother). Sufferers of domestic violence will find that Lac Su's memoir helps to give them a voice. (Also Lac is very honest about the sexual abuse he suffers due to a cousin.) However, the father is no two-dimensional boogeyman. Lac shows why he still loves his father, always loved his father--a man who worked hard for his family but did not understand how to express his frustrations at life and its obstacles except through violence.
The subject matter might make the book seem depressing, but in fact the plot moves along quickly and the tone is not at all self pitying. The author's empathy, ability to draw distinct portraits with his prose, and his basic humanity shine through.
Comment 40 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition
So, many years ago I was in a library and started reading "A Child Called It" just because it was there, having no priors of what it was about. That book messed me up so bad (leaving the library with it and lots of tears).
"I love yous" is very close to that.
I read "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mom" recently and someone recommended this book to me. After finishing it I am still not sure why. This is not the same kind of book as "Tiger Mom" at all.

How is it not "Tiger Mom"?

The similarity is that both books are about immigrant parents using certain parenting techniques, wanting their children to be successful.

The differences?

The parent in "Tiger Mom" (Amy Chua) is a second-generation immigrant. She and her husband are Yale professors. Her dad (first gen immigrant) is also PhD educated and is a professor at Purdue (or similar). Her idea of success is like performing at Carnegie Hall when 14 or training with world-class violinist. She spends HOURS and HOURS each day personally coaching her children. And OK her parenting techniques (verbal abuse, no playdate, hours of practices) perhaps may likely be frowned-upon by western parents.

The parent in "I love yous" (Lac Su's dad) is a refugee who identifies himself as "boat people". He has no formal education, doesn't know English, is on disability and depressed. His idea of success is to go to ANY college, to perhaps own apartments to rent, and maybe, if you are really super-smart, to become a doctor. His parenting techniques are almost definitely not approved by humanity.
Pages after pages things keep happening to little Lac. Each chapter begins with adorable pictures of Lac or his sister. Then the text hits you with various kinds of unfortunate and terribly awful things.
Read more ›
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

I Love Yous Are for White People: A Memoir
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
This item: I Love Yous Are for White People: A Memoir