Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $5.82 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used, good condition book. Average cover wear. Pages may have writing, underlining, highlighting and/or notes. Otherwise, pages remain in good condition. Exactly as pictured. Fast shipping from Amazon's fulfillment warehouse!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lovecraft Unbound Paperback – October 13, 2009


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.13
$3.93 $0.82
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Lovecraft Unbound + Lovecraft's Monsters + The New Annotated H. P. Lovecraft
Price for all three: $52.02

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 424 pages
  • Publisher: Dark Horse Books (October 13, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595821465
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595821461
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 1.2 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #600,461 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. The 16 new and four reprint stories Datlow (Poe) assembles for this outstanding tribute anthology all capture what Dale Bailey praises as horror master H.P. Lovecraft's gift for depicting the universe as inconceivably more vast, strange, and terrifying than mere human beings can possibly imagine. Bailey and Nathan Ballingrud, in The Crevasse, evoke this alien sensibility through an Antarctic expedition's glimpses of an astonishingly ancient prehuman civilization preserved in the polar ice. Laird Barron's Catch Hell depicts a Lovecraft-type backwoods community in the grip of a profoundly creepy occult mythology. Selections range in tone from the darkly humorous to the sublimely horrific, and all show the contributors to be perceptive interpreters of Lovecraft's work. Readers who know Lovecraft's legacy mostly through turgid and tentacled Cthulhu Mythos pastiches will find this book a treasure trove of literary terrors. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

The 16 new and four reprint stories Datlow (Poe) assembles for this outstanding tribute anthology all capture what Dale Bailey praises as horror master H.P. Lovecraft's gift for depicting the universe as inconceivably more vast, strange, and terrifying than mere human beings can possibly imagine. Bailey and Nathan Ballingrud, in The Crevasse, evoke this alien sensibility through an Antarctic expedition s glimpses of an astonishingly ancient prehuman civilization preserved in the polar ice. Laird Barron's Catch Hell depicts a Lovecraft-type backwoods community in the grip of a profoundly creepy occult mythology. Selections range in tone from the darkly humorous to the sublimely horrific, and all show the contributors to be perceptive interpreters of Lovecraft's work. Readers who know Lovecraft s legacy mostly through turgid and tentacled Cthulhu Mythos pastiches will find this book a treasure trove of literary terrors. (Starred Review - Oct.) --Publishers Weekly

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

All the stories are good.
bumdhar
With LOVECRAFT UNBOUND, Ellen Datlow has proven herself yet again as one of modern horror's finest and important editors.
Wilum Hopfrog Pugmire, Esq.
The best is the Caitlin Kiernan tale.
NEOPROG RAN

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Kelly C. Shaw on October 17, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Earlier this week I finished Ellen Datlow's new horror-themed anthology, Lovecraft Unbound (2009), featuring 22 contemporary authors riffing on and personalizing familiar Lovecraft themes and settings: impending apocalypse and cosmic horror, Antarctic quests and ancient cities, isolation and loneliness. Given the subject matter, the tone of Datlow's collection could have easily detoured into overwhelming despair.

Lovecraft Unbound, however, is a very well rounded collection and offers a wide range of stories, from irredeemably bleak personal visions (Laird Barron's "Catch Hell") to comical pastiches. While the majority of the stories tend toward the serious, the likes of Richard Bowes, William Browning Spencer, Joyce Carol Oates, and Nick Mamatas bring much-needed levity to the proceedings, providing the collection with a nice tonal balance.

Who am I kidding, though? I like my horror fiction straight up -- dark, scary, and cold sober. Here are a few brief thoughts on such stories, my favorites of the collection.

* Dale Bailey and Nathan Ballingrud team up for the book's auspicious opening, "The Crevasse," which takes place in Antarctica just after World War I. Told in prose pruned to perfection, the authors use Lovecraft's cosmic emptiness, as well as the barren setting, to amplify and parallel the protagonist's profound personal loss. Allow me this hyperbole: "The Crevasse" is Lovecraft by way of Raymond Carver.

* Caitlin R. Kiernan's "Houses Under the Sea" (2007; one of the book's four reprints), the best story in the collection, reinforces Kiernan's place on my list of favorite short story writers. (You disagree? Get thee to her masterful 2005 collection, To Charles Fort, With Love.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Matthew T. Carpenter on November 12, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lovecraft Unbound is an anthology produced by Dark Horse Comics and edited by the respected Ellen Datlow. It is a large trade paperback with a generous 336 pages, and costs a reasonable $19.95. The cover is an appropriate if uninspiring photo of Lovecraft. Production qualities were good; I do not recall any typos. One thing I really liked was at the end of each story there was a brief biography of the author and a comment by them about how HPL influenced them or their story. This should be a model for other anthologies. In many ways Lovecraft Unbound is very important because it is the first anthology of Lovecraftian themed stories edited by a woman, at least that I know about. Ann K. Schwader and Denise Dumars have released single author collections with a fair number of Cthulhu mythos stories, and Caitlyn Kiernan has written novels with Lovecraftian themes and concepts. Back in 1997 Joyce Carol Oates edited a collection of Lovecraft tales for Harper. In spite of this, the Cthulhu mythos has, until recently, been a sort of old boys club. Lately, however, more and more women have taken up the pen and added their names to the ever widening Lovecraft circle. Elizabeth Bear just won the Hugo for "Shoggoths in Bloom." In particular, the Cthulhu Unbound series from Permuted Press had a significant number of women authors. I wonder if either editor knew the other was going to use Unbound in their title.

Certainly this book has gotten more hype online than other titles in this vein; I've even seen on the shelves of local bookstores. It's good but I don't know that it's any better than other mythos books I've read lately.
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Shroud Magazine's Book Reviews VINE VOICE on January 9, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
H. P. Lovecraft's work stands as foundational for generations of writers. His continued influence is everywhere: in movies, television, and role-paying games. Search "Lovecraft" on Google or Amazon and be bombarded by free homage websites and numerous collections of his tales, as well as collections featuring contemporary stories inspired by his legacy.

"Lovecraft Unbound", edited by Ellen Datlow, stands above them all. In a collection boasting the quality one has come to expect from a Datlow-anthology, twenty-two of today's best writers present their visions of Lovecraft, managing to invoke a timeless, nameless dread in new, fresh ways. There's no "weak" story in this collection, but some of the most memorable are:

"The Crevasse", by Dale Bailey and Nathan Ballingrud, in which a doomed expeditionary team discovers something ominous and unearthly deep beneath the icy Antarctic wastes. "Sincerely, Petrified" by Anna Tambour is a tale in which two academics discover the risks of tampering with the power of myth-making. In "The Din of Celestial Birds" by Brian Evenson, a man stumbles down a mountainside with no memory of what's happened to him, and a strange skin aliment, and the certainty that something inside him is clawing its way to the surface.

"Come Lurk With Me and Be My Love" and "In the Black Mill", by William Browning Spencer and Michael Chabon, respectively, are absolutely hilarious, tongue-in-cheek pastiches of Lovecraft that are extremely well written; the first about a doomed suitor who meets the "wrong kind of girl", the second featuring the classic, doomed Lovecraftian scholar whose curiosity outweighs his survival instinct. On the other side of the spectrum, "Houses Under the Sea", by Caitlin R.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?