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Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy Hardcover – August 11, 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Univ Of Minnesota Press (August 11, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 081667468X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816674688
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,179,712 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Loving Animals should be read by everyone who is concerned about the ethics of our relationship with animals. It provides a philosophical middle ground between extreme views on each side of the animal rights issue."—Temple Grandin, author of Animals in Translation and Animals Make Us Human


"We live in a messy and imperfect world, as Kathy Rudy puts it, where it's often difficult to always do the ‘right’ thing for nonhuman animals or, in some cases, even know what the ‘right’ decision is. People who truly love animals come to the table with different views because of our complicated, ambiguous, and frustrating relationships with other beings. Loving Animals is a wide-ranging and challenging book that deserves a broad readership. Dr. Rudy reviews different schools of thought and argues convincingly that sacredness, spirituality, and love must be central themes in animal advocacy. The work of love allows us to work together and move forward even in the harshest of times. I agree. Read this book and share it widely and I'm sure numerous animals will thank us for doing this."—Marc Bekoff, author of The Emotional Lives of Animals


"In Loving Animals, Kathy Rudy offers a refreshing new perspective on animal advocacy that is intellectually coherent, emotionally satisfying, and beautifully written. Some of Rudy’s conclusions regarding how we should treat the animals in our lives are radical, and yet they make perfect sense. This book is a treat for both head and heart, and parts of it will spin your head around." —Hal Herzog, author of Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat: Why It’s So Hard To Think Straight About Animals

About the Author

Kathy Rudy is associate professor of ethics and women’s studies at Duke University. She is the author of Sex and the Church: Gender, Homosexuality, and the Transformation of Christian Ethics and Beyond Pro-Life and Pro-Choice: Moral Diversity in the Abortion Debate.


More About the Author

Kathy Rudy is associate professor of ethics and women's studies at Duke University. She is the author of "Sex and the Church: Gender, Homosexuality, and the Transformation of Christian Ethics" and "Beyond Pro-Life and Pro-Choice: Moral Diversity in the Abortion Debate."

Customer Reviews

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She is very smug in her beliefs and doesn't really back up anything she writes with any facts, it is a book full of her opinions.
Amazon Customer
Rudy not only defends the confinement and killing of animals for food, ad infinitum, but also laboratory experiments on animals, hunting, zoos, and a whole lot more.
John S. Sanbonmatsu
It must be first noted that Kathy Rudy has absolutely no relevant credentials that give her credibility to write about animal rights or animal welfare issues.
Tom Schmidt

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Constant Reader on September 16, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This very odd book is being marketed as a debunking of an animal-rights position based on "analytical philosophy," one that recommends replacing it with narrative (stories about how we love animals) and an Eastern idea of "connectedness." A couple of things make this strange. One is that she's attacking something of a straw man-- while I think it's the PETA position on pets that is her target (?), the argument for animal rights is far-ranging, and certainly people who have been advocating for decades against factory farms on the basis of environmental damage, or for apex predators because of the roles they play in ecosystems, will be bemused to discover that they need to learn about "connectedness." There are also worrying implications for basing animal rights on the animals we love AND THAT CAN LOVE US-- a problem beautifully portrayed by Jonathan Safran Foer in just a couple of pages in Eating Animals as he describes Germans rallying to save Knut the polar bear-- while eating sausages. What does this do for animals that don't love us back (snakes, frogs)? For animals we have scary stories about (sharks)? Doesn't it make more sense to organize against factory farms by joining animal rights to those concerned about environmental impacts and the treatment of illegal workers, rather than appealing to a love for pigs, which not everyone shares (hey, some of us aren't even fond of dogs)? And didn't we already have this in the 80s with the save-the-panda phenomenon, and leave it behind as animal rights folks clued in to environmentalism and ecosystems?

Rudy certainly is personally engaged and emotionally committed to her positions, and some readers may enjoy the very personal accounts here, but I found that element the most disturbing part of the book.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Alyce on January 4, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Under-researched, over-simplified, sentimental, often factually wrong, often tautological, etc. See Carol Adams's wonderful response to Rudy:

[...]

On the University of Minnesota website, you can read even more misinformation by Kathy Rudy, such as her claim that animal welfare and rights organizations have too many rules and policies for people who care about animals to accept so they're turned off, and she repeats over and over variations on the theme that the major animal advocacy organizations alienate folks by requiring that their employees (and members) all be vegan. This is absolutely not true for major organizations like PETA, HSUS, ALDF, and ASPCA (can't imagine what other organizations she's referring to). Maybe Rudy should read PETA's employment section ("compassion" seems to be the main criterion). Building arguments on patently false information is deceptive and unethical.

Sorry, Rudy, but love is not the answer. Other preposterous claims: Taming wildlife as a way of loving animals? Zoos and confinement as an antidote to extinction? (Has she never read Zoo Underground?) Does she have statistics to prove that animal advocacy organizations have not made a dent in the tragic oppression of animals? (I have lots of evidence they have made more than a dent.) Veganism is too hard and expensive? (She tried it for a while, said it was too hard and so she gave up. Nota bene: it's very true that you can be a vegan and live on Oreos and Fritos corn chips and Vitamin Water. Fact is, as with any "diet," one has to eat broadly and well, stay away from processed foods, and eat "close to the source.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Tom Schmidt on January 16, 2012
Format: Hardcover
It must be first noted that Kathy Rudy has absolutely no relevant credentials that give her credibility to write about animal rights or animal welfare issues. Her background is in feminism and ethics, subjects she teaches at Duke University. She has achieved nothing in the world of animal rights, headed no organizations, lobbied for no laws, nothing. Keep that in mind if you read this poorly written and (yes) dangerous diatribe which is possibly the first of its kind: An attack on the animal rights movement from the left.

There are so many factually inaccurate statements in this book, but probably the most frightening statement she makes is that enslaving animals is actually freedom. Her basic premise is that wildlife is doomed to extinction, so zoos are actually a great thing for the remaining animals. How a college professor can publish such drivel is really astonishing, and it is really a shame that she has a captive audience at Duke to imprint this nonsense on. It's tragic really.

If you are interested in animal rights and animal welfare issues, there are so many great books you can read which are written by the people who have given their lives to the movement and helped shape it. Gene Baur, Ingrid Newkirk, Kathy Stevens are a few names that come to mind. These are the people (and many more) that live outside the ivory tower in which Kathy Rudy resides. They have seen the realities firsthand, and they have gotten their hands dirty in championing animal rights and animal welfare. Listen to them, read their books, hear their stories - and then get involved. There is hope for animals in the future, but only if we all put effort into it. Animals will only have a future in the wild if humans will be their voice against those that couldn't care less about their fate.
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