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49 of 52 people found the following review helpful
on September 6, 2004
Jeremy finally falls in love.... I read "A Loving Scoundrel" in about 5 hours; couldn't put in down, really. Yes, it was predictable. Yes, the girl is always beautiful and ends up being really obnoxiously rich. Yes, the danger never really seems threatening. But it still was a bloody good read. I think I like Danny the best of all the Malory novel heroines (even better than Georgina, who is such a feisty girl). First, Danny is a street urchin, a thief who talks like gutter trash and keeps a mouse as a pet. This is no pampered princess here. Danny actually works hard to survive; plus, she has goals that very few romance novel heroines ever have. Where most heroines just go about the book wanting to marry and live happily ever after, Danny wants to marry AND help other orphans by running an orphanage. I found this to be sweet and commendable, as well as most happily un-heroine like. Danny is also blunt, which is nice, since she becomes quite the challenge for young scamp Jeremy, who has gads of girls falling all over themselves trying to get his notice. Having read about Jeremy for at least the last 15 years, I feel like I've grown up with him, and so it was fun to see him, near my own age, in his own story and struggling with romance. I loved how Danny denied him ... that boy was never denied anything before! Speaking of denying, there are a few reviews distastefully likening Danny and Jeremy's first night together as date rape. If you read more carefully, you would have noticed how much Danny was dying to have him since the moment they first met; on the night in question, yes, she was tipsy, but she had also made up her mind (was "tired of fighting it") to be with Jeremy ("Was he afraid she'd stop him? Not a chance, when she had such an amazing urge to feel his naked body against hers"). That is quite MORE than willing, thank you very much. Anyway, as Malory novels go, this one was fun, especially since it revolved around servants rather than aristocrats. Thankfully, this one also had the least amount of back-story and Malory family reunions (sacrilegious, I know) than the past few novels in the series, which was refreshing, really, since it allowed us to concentrate on the lovers and not family shenanigans. Some people may also harp on how unrealistic maid-turned-lady may be (dare we suggest they read "Pygmalion"?), but it worked for me. All in all, I enjoyed "A Loving Scoundrel," but would suggest reading it after you read the 6 other Malory novels that proceed it (starting with "Love Only Once"), just to find out why we Malory fans LOVE Jeremy and to know all the history of the unforgettable Malory family.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on May 12, 2004
Our beloved Malorys are back. We all waited in anticipation for the newest installment and Lindsey doesn't disappoint. Jeremy is now 25 years old and moving into a home of his own. Following in the footsteps of his father and uncles, Jeremy is taking the ton, namely the ladies, by storm. However, Percy, Jeremy's & Derek's bumbling friend, in typical fashion, has found himself in a bit of trouble and Jeremy comes to the rescue. Percy has lost two family heirlooms to a rather unscrupulous person and it is up to Jeremy to get them back. Only a Malory would think of using a thief to rob a thief. But this is where the trouble begins. Who would have thought Jeremy would choose a pickpocket who has been masquerading as a boy for 15 years? Danny, the pickpocket is an interesting character and doesn't give in easy to the charming and lovable Malory scoundrel.
I was a bit disappointed that there was not more interaction with his family, but overall it was a wonderful book and I look forward to the continuation of the Malory saga.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on July 29, 2004
The first Johanna Lindsey novel I ever read, probably when I was about 13, was Love Only Once, the first in the Malory family series, and it remains my one true favorite of Johanna Lindsey. I can't even count how many times I have read it since that first time. In A Loving Scoundrel: A Malory Novel, the author brings us back to that wonderfully fun, romantic and exciting family that produces more brave,flawed and sexy rakes and intelligent, independent and beautiful ladies than any family has a right to. What I love about Lindsey is she doesn't just write novels from the womans perspective as the main character, but also from the mans, such as she did in A Loving Scoundrel, where she gives Jeremy his chance to shine on his own. While there is always intrigue,romance,antagonists and some delicious love scenes, she also fleshes out characters you feel you know, novel to novel and can genuinely care about. I haven't loved every novel. Some of her more recent works have felt like she rushed through them, but I truly enjoyed this one, as I felt she got back to her Malory roots. I read this book in a day, and as is typical when I read, little else got done. When I read, I look to be entertained, its my favorite form of escapism, and Lindsey delivers in this novel. If you are a Lindsey fan, pick this up soon! If you haven't read her before, I highly recommend beginning with Love Only Once and then reading all the novels in the Malory family. Once you start with Johanna Lindsey, you are compelled to read them all. Not all her novels are based on the Malory family, but I admit, these are my favorites. Set aside some time, as Jeremy and Danny will demand your undivided attention!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on May 2, 2004
Jeremy Malory's book is finally here! As an avid fan of Ms. Lindsey's work, I've been disappointed in her more recent work, but this book lives up to every expectation. Jeremy Malory has all the charm of Anthony and James but has an added depth and compassion which work to make him a very appealing character. Johanna Lindsey does an excellent job of creating Jeremy's perfect mate. Danny, as a pickpocket who grew up in the London slums, fits Jeremy and his own childhood to perfection. It's such a treat to read a book about two people with such a capacity to love! It is my favorite book of Ms. Lindsey's since Tender Rebel and Gentle Rogue!
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
on August 24, 2005
I have read almost all of JL's books. I have thoroughly enjoyed most of them, especially the Malory series. I loved Jeremy when he was a teenager in all the previous books so I could hardly wait for him to get his own story.

Sadly, there is nothing special about it. Perhaps it's just that I have grown so used to JL's style, that nothing she writes could ever surprise me anymore. And I am sorry for that.

I loved Danny, in a sort of way. I loved the way she was decided and determined about her life. But really... violet eyes and silver blond hair? Come on... and she was so beautiful and yet almost nobody could see through her disguise for soooo many years? And the bad guy who only wanted the fortune and the title... sooooo one-dimensional. And the girl-disguied-as-boy was so perfectly done in Gentle Rogue, I would not have attempted a reuse here, it was clear from the beggining that it will not work!

Jeremy was the biggest disappointment. He came across as nothing special. The gorgeous blue-eyed, dark-haired rake will always be his uncle Anthony. Jeremy really didn't stand a chance from the beggining. It felt like JL reused some of her descriptions of Anthony, but diluted and unconvincing.

The love scenes did not "sizzle" in any way. And it is not plausible that someone like Danny, in that century, would be contented just to be Jeremy's mistress. I know she did not expect much from life, but still... she seemed more principled than that.

The only good part was Regina's involvement in her transformation, and the scene between James&co with that horrible girl's father.

Oh well... I guess I'm back to re-re-re-reading Gentle Rogue or Angel again.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Johanna Lindsey takes us back to Regency England in another romantic farce starring the Malory clan. The story begins when London's most handsome and eligible bachelor, Jeremy Malory, hires himself a thief to help a friend recover some jewelry he was cheated out of. The thief Jeremy forcibly hires is 20-year-old Danny, who is really a woman masquerading as a man. When she was 5, Danny's home was broken into, and everyone in it but her and the nurse she escaped with was murdered. Danny has no memories of anything before she was rescued by a young prostitute in an alley after her nurse died, and has been masquerading as a man to avoid a fate of prostitution for herself. Jeremy, a seducer of women, notices right off that she's no man, and it's simply in his nature to try to talk her into bed. Danny escapes his clutches, but winds up coming to him for a job when she gets kicked out of the house where she's been living. Jeremy sees it as his opportunity to seduce her, and is quite perplexed when she refuses to become his mistress, preferring to work as a maid instead.

Jeremy has vowed to never get married, and finds himself in a fix when a young debutante schemes to get him to the altar. Danny saves the day by dressing up and posing as his fiancée, and soon after, she falls into bed with Jeremy, though she still refuses to become his mistress. Her one appearance at a ball with Jeremy has put her in danger, though, because she looks so much like her mother that the man responsible for her family's murders takes note and decides to have her done in for good. Jeremy saves her, of course, and falls in love with her, too, since she's so much different than any woman he has ever known. Danny also finds out who she really is in the end, too, and everyone lives happily ever after.

Though it's been awhile since I last read a Lindsey novel, I still wouldn't say this was one of her best. It wasn't awful, but it was pretty light reading. The idiosyncratic speech of the characters in the book is laid on a little thick, probably because it's the only thing besides the occasional mention of a coach ride to give this novel a sense of going back in time. Nobody seems to have an inner monologue, choosing instead to discuss their innermost feelings with whoever happens to be present at the time. While we have plenty of time with Danny's thoughts and feelings, Jeremy is a one-dimensional character whose sole purpose in the book is to marry Danny at the end. It seemed like Lindsey was far too busy making sure every Malory in existence put in some kind of appearance than developing the characters this book was supposed to be about and, as a result, it lacked depth. It's been years since I read the other Malory books, but I seem to remember them having more intricate plots, and being a little less...well...silly.

If you're looking for deep, moving, classical literature, keep looking. If, however, you enjoy a light romantic farce heavy on colloquialisms, this could be the book for you.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on June 15, 2004
I gave the book three stars because I was actually able to finish reading it, but all the way through, Jeremy Malory creeped me out. He showed no real feeling for Danny, just a consistent need to get her between the sheets. His seductive powers seemed to consist only of a lowered voice and burning glances. He comes off as a somewhat churlish frat boy when he takes advantage of Danny's overindulgence to literally trip her up into his bed. (What finesse!) Don't forget this little trick is played while she is his lowly maidservant. With cruder dialogue and more graphic imagery, this could be a letter to a men's magazine. Jeremy's gift of a puppy and a kitten didn't even show any romance, but seemed more like afterthoughts tossed in to make him a nicer guy. There just didn't seem to be any real feeling between Danny and Jeremy to make the physical passion meaningful. I think Jeremy would have been a better character if he'd displayed more empathy for Danny's upbringing, especially in light of his own past. I had trouble believing Danny would throw off her long held principles just because Jeremy was "so bleedin' handsome."
Something else interfered with my enjoyment of the book, and that was the artificial nature of the social background. The descriptions of the lower class people rang somewhat more true, but I don't think the society people of those times would blithely mingle their female relatives and their mistresses and their maids. The whole "let's dress the maid/mistress up in a ball gown" business just struck a false note. Instead of being a cherished Cinderella, Danny seemed to be a convenience, someone easily used.
In reading back over this review, I decided three stars was too many. I enjoyed most of the other Malory books, but this one was a disappointing two star effort.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on April 20, 2006
I have never been a romance novel reader, however, I've always been a fan of any books taking place in historical England. I recently was "turned onto" Johanna Lindsey's books and low and behold, I was sucked into them. This is the 3rd of her books that I've read, and this was, by far, the best! It's a wonderful story line with an excellent plot, and totally believable characters of the time period. Given were distinctly and vividly written descriptions of each of the characters...so much so that you can easily picture them in your head as you read. Of course, another happy ending. I had a hard time putting this down and finished it in 2 days. I would recommend this to anyone.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 28, 2006
I have been reading Malory novels since I was 16 and still in High School, I'm 28 now and I still love them just as much now as I did then. I don't read romances as much as I did when I was a teenager, but authors like Lindsey keeps making me come back.

I thought this storyline was unique, the fact that it did revolve around servants. In a way it reminded me of the movie "Ever After" where Drew Barrymore's character was forced into a servant life but was not born one, same with Danny.

Jeremy is also my favorite Malory man, so I loved that he was paired with such a fiesty and seemingly unlikely partner.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on July 15, 2005
I truly hope this book marks a new beginning for all of JL's fans. I was starting to get worried that we had lost her.

Both Jeremy and Danny were fabulous. I believe that one of the reasons that I love the Malory series so much is because JL has a way of bringing in all her characters without drowning out the two main characters. (Ahhhh, but I do love James. I can read Gentle Rogue every day.)
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