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Lucifer Vol. 1: Devil in the Gateway Paperback – June 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (June 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1563897334
  • ISBN-13: 978-1563897337
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.4 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #595,897 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Or at least, as the most interesting character.
MWebb
In the first graphic novel of the Lucifer series we find him playing piano... in the most exclusive club (Luxe), in the city of angels, Los Angeles.
Merlin63
If you've read Sandman and liked it, there's a good chance this is up your alley.
Drektath

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Glen Engel Cox on January 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
It takes some arrogance, worthy of the Prince of Lies himself, to claim, as this book does, that the book is based on characters created by Neil Gaiman, Sam Kieth, and Mike Dringenberg. I would think that, at the very least, John Milton might have some prior claim on the creation of Lucifer, the fallen angel, but in the legal shenanigans of the comic world, what that claim is actually revealing is that this graphic novel is a spin-off from Gaiman's incredibly popular Sandman series. As such, it shares a lot in common with Gaiman's re-envisioning of mythology. In Sandman: Seasons of Mist, Lucifer resigned from his post in Hell, had his wings cut off by Dream, and "retired" to host a nightclub called Lux in a distorted reflection of Rick's from Casablanca, although in Lux, Lucifer plays his own piano. This book and series picks up where that left off, opening with a visit from an angel of the host to Lucifer to offer him a job for whatever price Lucifer will name. Thus begins the wheels-within-wheels that is the hallmark of this series.

In his introduction, Gaiman states that whenever another comic writer would ask him what he thought should spin-off from Sandman, he always told them "Lucifer," which is likely not what any of them wanted to hear, instead hoping for dream assignments (pun intentional) like Death, Desire or Destiny. But, as in most things relating to his comic, Gaiman was spot on. He had already covered the possibilities with the Endless, while Lucifer was the perfect protagonist: extremely flawed yet ultimately intriguing, charming and deadly, full of pride but also hubris. Lucifer is the character you don't want to like, but you can't help yourself from doing so because, unlike the throne of Heaven, Lucifer is much more like us.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
I thought it was great, just great.
Carey functions within Gaimen's world, yet he goes way beyond stale imitation. Weaving together eclectic mythological influences, he makes a series that is very much uniquely his own. This series contains many elements I don't think many authors could make work. How do you build up, ehem, sympathy for the Devil? With a main character of such incredible skill and power, how do you put him in suspenceful situations. Similarly, how do you get him out of those situations without it looking like a silly Deus Ex Machina?
I've only read this first trade paperback of the series. Sure, there a lot of open questions, but that's the way it should be. This is, on the whole, a darker series than Sandman, it's mostly about despair and imprisonment, whereas Sandman conveyed a fair bit of hope and freedom. But you have to consider the main character.
Overall, the only comic to make me want to stick with the Sandman Universe.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Tin Pham on January 26, 2004
Format: Paperback
Well I am a huge Sandman and HellBlazer fan and the Morningstar was definitely one of my favourite supporting characters.
I did not have much trouble jumping into this trade with all my background knowledge from Sandman and my reading of mythology.
Readers new to the Vertigo line of comics may find this series at first confusing.
So please bear in mind that things are really explained in the next two trades. After careful readings "Lucifer: The Divine Comedy", "Lucifer: Children and Monsters" and "Lucifer: Inferno" you really appreciate the intricate weavings of the story.
Going back to this first trade, I found myself going, "oh that is what he was talking about". After all, Lucifer has an almost cosmic awareness and it is an interesting twist that he sees and hears more than even the reader.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Arthur M. Bullock on July 22, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It's been over a decade since Sandman #23, in which Lucifer closed up Hell, had his wings cut off, and (as we later learned) opened a night spot in L.A. Now he stars in his own saga, under a new team of writer and illustrators. The result is the most successful to date of the various attempts to keep the Sandman franchise going since the climactic events of Sandman #69. As is usually the case with compilations from an on-going series, "Lucifer: Devil in the Gateway" leaves too many loose ends to entirely succeed as a stand-alone graphic novel. Nevertheless, the cast of characters and original stories are very much worthy of its progenitor. The stories in this collection aren't really dependent on familiarity with the Sandman series to understand what's going on. Still, Gaiman's Sandman is a classic and the keystone of DC's Vertigo line to which "Lucifer" belongs, so I would recommend reading at least the collections "Preludes and Nocturnes" and "Season of Mists" first. Those who have done so are very likely to enjoy following these new tales of Lucifer.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By R. Benardes on July 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
Positive reviews makes me curious about any comic book and I picked this one up with high expectations, after I finished I was a bit dissapointed because it didn't filled up all my expectations.
Lucifer series is a bit slow moving and vague for my taste but I heard that it gets better and I'm looking forward to read the next issues.Carey's writing is stylish and erudite and his main caracther is well developed.The art of Chris Weston is very good ;unfortunately he left off after issue 3 and was replaced by Peter Gross(Books of Magic).
In some parts Lucifer lacks narrative drive and demands attention because Carey loves cryptic sentences.Overall a good comic book but a little overated too.
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More About the Author

Mike Carey got into writing through comic books, where his horror/fantasy series Lucifer garnered numerous international awards and was nominated for five Eisners. From there he moved into novels and screenplays, while still maintaining a presence in the comics world (he is currently writing two of Marvel's flagship titles, X-Men and Ultimate Fantastic Four). His movie Frost Flowers, an erotic ghost story, is currently in production with Hadaly/Bluestar Pictures. He lives in London, England, about as far as you can get from the centre of the city and still have access to the London Underground train network. His wife, Linda, writes fantasy for young readers under the pseudonym A.J. Lake. They have three children and an implausibly beautiful cat.

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