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Lucifer at the Starlite: Poems Paperback – January 31, 2011


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Lucifer at the Starlite: Poems + What Is This Thing Called Love: Poems + Ordinary Genius: A Guide for the Poet Within
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 89 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; unknown edition (January 31, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393335259
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393335255
  • Product Dimensions: 0.3 x 5.5 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #507,534 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Addonizio's gifts—clarity, wicked wit and directness about sex—remain on view in this, her fifth, collection, albeit with slightly diminishing returns. The Bay Area poet (What Is This Thing Called Love) extracts humor from headlines, takes comfort in the everyday and manages both to celebrate and to decry her complicated sexual self: My Heart, she says, is That initial-scarred tabletop,/ that tiny little dance floor... That dressing room in the fetish boutique... That funhouse, that horror, that soundtrack of screams. Verse about modern love can push the bounds of the art, or of the unartful: poems try coyly to say things/ disallowed from serious poetry/ and employ instead the lexicon of porn spam. Such work can certainly entertain. Less happily, poems based on fairy tales land too close to their older model, Anne Sexton, and poems about public catastrophes (Hurricane Katrina, the Asian tsunami of 2004, the Iraq war) end up neither funny nor seriously powerful. Some of Addonizio's best poems ought to be popular—a counterpart, as it were, to chick lit fiction (I lost you like that grape jawbreaker/ I'd saved for last) and far better technically than many kindred poets. Fans of Addonizio's prior books will find much to like, but newcomers might do better with earlier volumes. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“Bitter, urgent and unsparing, her poems are also at times jaw-droppingly brilliant.” (San Diego Union-Tribune)

Lucifer at the Starlite sounds like a glam-rock show and holds many poems that hurtle forward, filled with emotion that doesn't spill into sentimentality.” (San Francisco Chronicle)

More About the Author

Kim Addonizio is a fiction writer, poet, and teacher. Her poetry collections include Tell Me, a finalist for the National Book Award, What Is This Thing Called Love, and Lucifer at the Starlite. She lives in Oakland, California.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Chuck Augello on September 10, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Kim Addonizio writes poetry stripped of pretension and fussy sterility. Her poems live in the streets, hang out with questionable characters, and could beat up most other poems without breaking a sweat. Her latest collection moves away from the tortured relationship poems of her earlier collection and lets in more of the world at large. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan bubble beneath the surface of these witty, sometimes painful pieces. Addonizio deserves a wide readership.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John Domini on September 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Kim Addonizio likes a declarative line, & one of the great pleasures in reading LUCIFER AT STARLITE, her latest collection of poems, is to see her bring that line to its sharpest focus, while losing none of her free-swinging American swagger. A number of witty standouts (oh say, "Yes," "You," "Forms of Love," "The Matter") works as strings of brief sentences. Lines can play smart tricks on each other, as in:
"Some men aren't content with mere breakage, they've got to burn you to the ground.
Some men you've reduced to ashes are finally dusting themselves off."
But whatever the interplay between pieces, such poems always amount to a whole; they arrive at a hardboiled wisdom -- hardboiled, & then diced & mixed with mayo & celery & served on chewy rye. I mean that, even when Addonizio turns reflective & serious during LUCIFER's final section, as in "God Ode" or "In the Evening" (a lovely & hurting meditation on taking care of an aging mother), she never strays into the precious. She never betrays the brass-in-pocket worldliness of the woman who seems a model for her, namely, Dorothy Parker. Nonetheless, in LUCIFER this poem's disappointed toughness allows room for a lot of the larger world, more than ever in her career. The opener, "November 11th," riffs side-of-the-mouth & street-smart on all the day's dead, then loses some of its lightheartedness as it meditates on Iraqi & American dead, then abruptly arrives at a loss more chilling because more close to home:
"I almost forgot my neighbor's niece, 16 and puking
in Kaiser Emergency, the cause a big mystery
until the autopsy -- toxic shock syndrome,
of all things -- I thought that was history, too,
but I guess girls are still dying; who knew! I run..."
That "who knew!
Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Erin R. Hopson on December 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This is a classic example of this authors poetry. Absoloutly love this book; every time I read it I find a new favorite!
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By Robert McDowell on November 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
No one today writes with more boldness and verve than this poet. Addonizio sparkles, mining the nooks and crannies of the heart with unflagging courage and tenacity. Her wit is also good company, so climb aboard and enjoy the ride. These poems will take you places you didn't necessarily know you wanted to visit, but you'll be glad you got there. Somehow, she makes you feel better about yourself, too.The More We Get Together: The Sexual & Spiritual Language of Love
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book of free-verse poetry has more line tension/enjambment than Billy Collins’ poetry. Nearly every line has a separate meaning on its own and within the poem… a great way to keep the reader on their toes, anticipating the next dip and rise in her intensely poetic lines. Kim Addonizio’s poetry also inspires me to aspire to book publication, for her poems employ language tricks I implement in my own poetry: tense enjambments, humorous anaphora, prose paragraph efforts, irreverent forms, and, best of all, forays into blending the real world with the imaginative one in our heads. Love her poems!
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