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Luke Cage Noir Paperback – August 18, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Noir
  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel (August 18, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785135456
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785135456
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #471,997 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 11 customer reviews
P.S. In truth, I could imagine Bogart in this movie.
Andrew Kuligowski
In all, I felt this was a wonderful book with artwork and story interesting and nuanced enough to be worth repeat reads.
Talvi
The black and white art is absolutely gorgious and perfect for the tone and time period of the story.
S. M. Vennema

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Talvi TOP 100 REVIEWER on January 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
I've never been a fan of noir (it can be a little too cliche'd) and am not steeped in the history of Luke Cage or the Marvel Universe. So I came into this graphic novel with a clean slate and without expectations.

I greatly enjoyed this graphic novel. The artwork is beautiful and captures beautifully in earthen tones of browns, beiges, and blacks, the world of 1920s Harlem. The refined art is matched by excellent storytelling and writing. The lingo of the era (Harlem - not just "noir") is nicely captured to further enhance the mood and feel. The main character can be introspective without being over the top pretentious like so many noir works. If anything, the Luke Cage of this story is a quiet and simple man and he thinks/acts/feels that way. It's a nice change from noir's prototypical anti hero - the 'down on his luck but intelligent sad sack" who spouts unbelievable dialogue and burps existential thoughts about 'dames' and life.

What I liked most about the story is that the author and artist were restrained in their depiction of late 1920s Harlem. Characters don't hang out at the Cotton Club, for example. They frequent the little local areas they know so well.

In all, I felt this was a wonderful book with artwork and story interesting and nuanced enough to be worth repeat reads.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Sherman on October 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Marvel's "Power Man" is reborn in the Noir universe thanks to Mike Benson and Adam Glass, and brought to life by Shawn Martinbrough. Collecting Luke Cage Noir #1-4, the comic takes place in Prohibition-era Harlem, where Cage returns after 10 years in Riker's. While regarded as a living legend by his peers, Cage gets anything but a hero's welcome when he's hired to investigate the murders of both a white socialite and his former lover. Out of the other Marvel Noir comics I've read so far, I can honestly say I've enjoyed this one the most. Though alternate continuity comics like this usually garner unfair expectations and criticisms, this is a straight-forward, action-packed murder/mystery pulp story and a worthy entry in Cage's franchise. Included is a concept gallery by Martinbrough and a variant cover gallery by Dennis Calero.

This comic is unrated: Violence, Adult Language, Adult Situations.
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Format: Paperback
My usual definition of "noir" involves "can I picture Humphrey Bogart playing one or more roles in the movie version". After reading Luke Cage: Noir, I may need to amend that definition slightly.

The basic plot: Luke Cage is released from prison (for a crime he did not commit) after allegedly agreeing to undergo a series of medical experiments. He arrives back in New York City and must decide how to put the pieces of his life back together and what to do with all of the tomorrows to come. (This overview may sound familiar to readers of the modern day "Hero for Hire".) Cage is hired by a Randall Banticoff to investigate the murder of his young wife. Before addressing the "whodunit" aspect of the situation, the first part of the mystery is: why was a white woman found dead in Harlem, of all places? The second: why was she killed? Then, maybe, we can address identifying the culprit.
Benson and Glass re-imagine the modern day super-hero Luke Cage as a man inhabiting New York City in the 1920s. They successfully use this tableau to view and comment upon racial non-equality of the period, and how prohibition caused much social upheaval than simply whether or not one could buy a drink legally.

Perhaps my only quibble with the work is that the limited use of existing Marvel Universe characters redefined in a new environment seemed to actually distract from the material, rather than instilling a bit of fun in it as did Gaiman's Marvel 1602. Then again, from a marketing standpoint, this move was probably a necessity - I, for one, probably would have passed by this work on the shelf had the tie-in to Luke Cage not caught my eye.
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Format: Hardcover
My usual definition of “noir” involves “can I picture Humphrey Bogart playing one or more roles in the movie version”. After reading Luke Cage: Noir, I may need to amend that definition slightly.

The basic plot: Luke Cage is released from prison (for a crime he did not commit) after allegedly agreeing to undergo a series of medical experiments. He arrives back in New York City and must decide how to put the pieces of his life back together and what to do with all of the tomorrows to come. (This overview may sound familiar to readers of the modern day “Hero for Hire”.) Cage is hired by a Randall Banticoff to investigate the murder of his young wife. Before addressing the “whodunit” aspect of the situation, the first part of the mystery is: why was a white woman found dead in Harlem, of all places? The second: why was she killed? Then, maybe, we can address identifying the culprit.

Benson and Glass re-imagine the modern day super-hero Luke Cage as a man inhabiting New York City in the 1920s. They successfully use this tableau to view and comment upon racial non-equality of the period, and how prohibition caused much social upheaval than simply whether or not one could buy a drink legally.

Perhaps my only quibble with the work is that the limited use of existing Marvel Universe characters redefined in a new environment seemed to actually distract from the material, rather than instilling a bit of fun in it as did Gaiman’s Marvel 1602. Then again, from a marketing standpoint, this move was probably a necessity – I, for one, probably would have passed by this work on the shelf had the tie-in to Luke Cage not caught my eye.
Read more ›
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