Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Lully:Atys
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Lully:Atys

8 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
2-Disc Version
Customers also viewed these available items
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Format: Color, NTSC
  • Dubbed: English
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Harmonia Mundi, U.S.
  • DVD Release Date: November 8, 2011
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0062FWALO

Customer Reviews

5 star
75%
4 star
0%
3 star
25%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Paul Van de Water on October 31, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
William Christie and Les Arts Florissants have led the revival of French baroque operas. Their performances of Lully's Atys at L'Opera Comique in Paris in 1987 and at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 1989 received widespread acclaim and convincingly demonstrated the viability of the genre. Their CD recording on Harmonia Mundi Lully: Atys made after the Paris premiere was hailed as exemplary, but only now does this Blu-ray disc allow us to appreciate fully what all the fuss was about. A second disc provides five supplementary features totaling a hour and a half about the opera and the production. [I purchased my copy from Amazon.co.uk, where it has been available since October 25.]

Thanks to philanthropist Ronald Stanton, L'Opera Comique, BAM, and two other French theaters have been able to mount a new production of Atys, which was recorded in high-def video in Paris in May 2011. The result is nothing short of spectacular. Based on a poem by Ovid, Atys is the story of ultimately tragic love between gods and humans. The opera is presented here as it might have been performed before Louis XIV, who considered it a favorite. The sets suggest the interior of a baroque palace. The ornate costumes and wigs are described by New York Times reviewer Allan Kozinn as "mostly Sun King chic with variations to suggest mythological times." The frequent dances, he writes, are presented "with an elegance that [is] constantly riveting." And it goes almost without saying that the vocal and instrumental work under Christie's leadership is virtually flawless.

This performance demonstrates that baroque operas can be entirely effective without any trendy modernizing. It would be nice if director Jean-Marie Villégier would set himself to Handel. But in the meantime I will glory in this beautiful rendition of Atys.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Joseph L. Ponessa on November 25, 2011
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I have spent the last two days immersed in the blu-ray of Lully's 315-minute opera ATYS as presented earlier this year in Paris. Soon into the lengthy work something became noticeable in particular, that although I was following along with the English subtitles, the French diction was so clear that I could actually understand nearly every word and sometimes anticipate the next one, despite my challenged French. I recalled that I had read in the liner notes to Charpentier's MEDEE, recorded by Christie in the 1980's, how the cast had assembled to read through the words of the entire libretto first, before beginning to rehearse the music. So I continued to follow the blu-ray of ATYS closely. After an hour, I had to retire for the night, but the next day resumed viewing, and then went on to watch the excellent 100-minute interview disc. There even more substance was added to the rationale for emphasizing the declamation of the text.
Lully virtually invented French opera, after working for some time in collaboration with Moliere on music for stage plays. Lully lived in the golden age of French drama, and had excellent texts available to set to music. William Christie wrote his dissertation in America on the role of declamation and rhetoric in French opera, before going to France and putting his theories into practice. The result has been a resurrection of French baroque style. The 1989 revival of ATYS after two hundred years of dormancy was an important event in that revival, and the current blu-ray documents the 2011 reincarnation of that production with the same director, who is also a scholar of the period in his own right.
This ATYS is not exactly the same as the original production in 1676.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By wolfgang731 on November 30, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Lully's stage works are, arguably, among the most well represented in all of baroque opera. There's the beautiful Persee from Toronto's Opera Atelier, the charming Bourgeois Gentilhomme and the spectacular Cadmus & Hermione, both from Le Poeme Harmonique. I can't comment on Armide as I have yet to see it. Now we have an absolutely indispensible Atys from the man who almost single handedly rekindled the world's interest in French baroque opera, William Christie and his intrepid band, Les Arts Florissants. Any Lully fan can just stop reading this review right now and purchase, without reservation, a copy of this extraordinary performance staged at Paris's Opera Comique. From the singing, acting, mise-en- scene, dancing and, of course, conducting, playing and direction, everything about this production is just glorious. American philanthropist, Ronald Stanton, funded this revival of the original 1987 production, directed by Jean-Marie Villegier and all I can say is THANK YOU, MR. STANTON, for your generosity and foresight. This is a text book production, as I don't believe there is one thing about it that wasn't thoroughly considered and lovingly crafted. The singers could hardly be improved upon, especially Bernand Richter's heartfelt performance as Atys, Stephanie d'Oustrac's impassioned Cybele, Emmanuelle de Negri's Sangaride and Paul Agnew's Le Sommeil. The choreography by the late Francine Lancelot and reconstructed by Beatrice Massin is delightful and unobtrusive. The costumes by Patrice Cauchetier are a veritable feast for the eyes. I've no doubt that a considerable portion of the production's budget was allocated for the costumes. Sumptuous is the only word I can use to describe garments of such intricate filigree and detail.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?