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Luz Sees the Light (Future According to Luz) Paperback – August 1, 2011


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Luz Sees the Light (Future According to Luz) + Freddie Ramos Takes Off (Zapato Power) + Freddie Ramos Springs Into Action (Zapato Power)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 360L (What's this?)
  • Series: Future According to Luz (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 96 pages
  • Publisher: Kids Can Press (August 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1554537665
  • ISBN-13: 978-1554537662
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 6.8 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,042,706 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Graphic designer and children's illustrator Claudia Dávila was born in Chile and now makes her home in Toronto. She was formerly the art director of Chirp and Chickadee magazines.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By KatieWonderGirl on April 13, 2012
Format: Paperback
My kids really enjoyed this, and I was glad to be able to share something with them that showed a "real" seeming kid struggling with issues I fully expect them to grapple with as our resource-constrained and climate-catastrophized future unfolds.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By GraphicNovelReporter.com on February 22, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Luz is jumping around, watching TV and waiting for her brownie to finish warming up in the microwave. Her fun comes to a sudden end when there's a blackout. This gets Luz to start thinking.

At first she's very much in her own world, wanting expensive shoes and goofing around. Things going on in her neighborhood -- like the blackouts and her mother's concern about gas prices -- get the girl to start thinking. Her mother also teaches her about how buying locally can help in numerous ways. If they buy local foods, they'll save money and gas and curb some pollution.

Luz takes this to heart and decides to turn an abandoned lot into a neighborhood park and garden. With the help of her friends, she succeeds in this. The garbage-filled abandoned lot soon has a garden full of vegetables and park equipment so the neighborhood can come together and socialize.

Luz Sees the Light aims to inspire kids to help the environment. And while I don't think many kids will be able to turn an abandoned lot into a park (if only because they don't have the resources or zoning), it can teach them about gardening and recycling. At the end of the graphic novel there's even information on how to make compost. The fact that the main character is a kid is also a good thing. It shows that everyone can take steps to help, even if they're small steps, and that you don't have to be an adult to make a difference.

Luz Sees the Light is a serious book, but it isn't scary. Instead of frightening children into action, like some books, it gives them beneficial ideas that look fun. It also isn't preachy. As important as helping the environment is, if the writer had taken a preachy tone, it would turn readers off. But thankfully she doesn't do that, which is to the benefit of everyone involved.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Marcela Landres on November 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
A topical graphic novel about a spunky girl who organizes her community to transform a run-down lot into a self-sustaining park and garden, ideal for progressive kids and their parents.
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Format: Hardcover
Reading Nancy Drew books fed my young imagination with a much-needed female character who's intelligent, gutsy, clever, and resourceful while she solved mysteries, fighting the "bad guys" and helping the oppressed. A real heroine.

Luz is a similar role model for modern girls in an action-packed graphic novel Luz Sees the Light (great pun: Luz means "light" in Spanish). She's an energetic young teen who becomes increasingly aware of troubles in her environment. Sure, we get a slice of her life in the city--going to school, meeting a new kid in the neighborhood. And she's a typical teen consumer saving her money to buy some cool shoes. But she ends up walking to the mall with a friend after her mom refuses to drive her due to high gasoline prices. An electricity blackout becomes not just a silencer of electronic toys, but an opportunity to hang out with friends face-to-face.

Luz finds herself attracted to the quiet of a trashed-filled abandoned lot, and imagines it could be--how about a park for the neighborhood? And she's inspired by resourceful DIY neighbors growing veggies in their small garden and re-using stuff. Unbeknownst to her family, she gets the city's permission to clean up the lot. Her friends join in to remove trash, add plants and a concert area. At the big unveiling of the new park, her mom is surprised and delighted. And their new park becomes a start for community-building in the neighborhood for young and old.

Refreshing dynamic graphics, a likable character, and an engaging story to promote ecological awareness and action.

Since I'm not a mom, a teacher, or a librarian, I'm curious to know how young readers respond to the book. Is her transformation into environmental awareness believable and admirable? Would her changes inspire real kids to take the initiative like she does? Would they feel they're being preached to instead of shown? I'm not sure.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. Kelly on February 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Hey Kids,

Want to read a black/white/brown graphic novel that lectures you about climate change?

Yes, me neither.

I dislike when agendas are shoehorned into books, hidden in the guise of "It's a graphic novel, they'll like it." I am an environmentalist and an educator, but know that for a message to be effective, it has to be appealing. Multiple pages in Luz Sees the Light feature quotes like, "If we keep relying on imports, eventually we won't be able to afford the things we need. So we should buy from local farms and businesses and produce our own stuff." This is the ultimate in telling-not-showing, which turns off readers and prevents the message from being communicated.

From electricity blackouts to rising gas prices to vegetarianism to composting, there is just too much crammed into Luz Sees the Light. While environmental issues are interconnected, author Claudia Davila should have focused on just one aspect so that her target audience could better digest these important lessons.
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