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MARVEL MASTERWORKS: Atlas Era Heroes Vol 2 (Featuring the Human Torch, Captain America,& Sub-Mariner) Hardcover – February 27, 2008


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Product Details

  • Series: Marvel Masterworks
  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Entertainment; 1st edition (February 27, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785124608
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785124603
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 7.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,130,476 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By DJ Joe Sixpack HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on December 7, 2012
Format: Hardcover
"Marvel Masterworks: Atlas Era Heroes, v.2"
(Marvel Comics, 2008)

After World War Two, the craze for superhero comics died down, replaced by other genres such as crime, horror, romance and humor books, and although DC Comics managed to keep Superman and Batman as top sellers, over at Timely-Atlas-Marvel, the mystery men of WWII were all canceled and lost to the tides of time... Well, at least for a few years. In the early 1950s, while tinkering with adventure titles such as Young Men and Men's Adventures, the editors at Atlas decided to gamble again on the goofy guys in long underwear, and brought their best-known superheros out of retirement. The Sub-Mariner, Human Torch, and finally, Captain America all came back to life with new stories that mirrored the tone of the times, and also showcased the new sophistication of the graphic artists at the time.

This volume notably gathers the three lone issues of the revived Captain America's own comic, filled with rabidly anti-Communist plotlines and fabulous art from newcomer John Romita. Romita has always been one of my favorite Marvel artists, and it's fascinating to see how fully developed his style was so early in his career. Other artists in this collection, such as Dick Ayers and Carl Burgos, still had some of the blunt, crude look of the '40s comics, but Romita's art -- heavily influenced by cartoonist Milton Caniff -- was more fine-lined and sleek, and his dynamism and sense of motion were striking as well. The hysteric, even bloodthirsty, tenor of the politics -- an echo of the anti-Axis virulence seen in the '40s -- apparently didn't sit well with readers in the Eisenhower era: the Korean War was unpopular with many Americans, and the jingoism that worked against Hitler rang false in the following decade.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Johnny Heering on August 29, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This second volume of Marvel Masterworks Atlas Era Heroes reprints Men's Adventures #27 to 28, Captain America #76 to 78 and Human Torch #36 to 38. These comics brought back the "Big Three" Marvel heroes from the World War II era, Captain America, The Human Torch and The Sub-Mariner. The heroes battle communists as often as not. These comics are kind of fun, although quite simplistic by today's standards.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bob on August 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a child little more than a toddler in the late 1950's I saw one or two Atlas Hero books in a box at an older friends house (one was a Sub-Mariner and the other was a Black Knight) and fell in love with them but she would not part with them. It wasn't until Marvel (most likely due to Roy Thomas) began reprinting the lost 1950's gems in Marvel Super Heroes that I even remembered those books.
Now with the three volumes published (and a fourth Black Knight and Yellow Claw) on the way) we have all the 1950's Atlas Heroes back in print in chronolocigal order. Volume one did all the issues of Young Men as well as Bill Everett's Marvel Boy. This volume does all the Men's Adventures and the solo books of Captain America and the Human Torch. Volume 3 collects the entire 10 issue solo run of Sub-Mariner by the great Bill Everett.
This review is for volume 2 and it is a fantastic book not to be missed. Not only do you get all the Men's Adventures with all three characters in them but you get all the very rare Captain America and Human Torch issues featuring nice art by John Romita, Dick Ayers and others.
The only drawback at all is there are only five Sub-Mariner stories (two in Men's Adventures and one each in Human Torch) and of those five only three are by Bill Everett with two by Bob Powell. However don't get me wrong this book is well worth the price. If you search out the original comics they'll cost you between $100 to $500 depending on condition each. Plus you get a excellent forward by Marvel Comics (and DC) alumni and publisher of Alter-Ego the best comics history magazine: Roy Thomas!
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By alman5555 on February 25, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I originally bought this book for the rare 1950's Captain America stories. But i was more impressed with the human torch stories, especially the colorful artwork. Many of the stories deal with communist spies and the Korean war, and provide plenty of action. The asians are obviously stereotyped caricatures, but that doesnt bother me, since that was indicative of the time period. Comics from the 1950's through the early to mid 1990's were great. Today its just a shadow of its former glory.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the little known attempt by Marvel (then known as Atlas) to revive their line of super-heroes after the Golden Age crash. The only reason it didn't get 5 stars is that Marvel chose to include everything - including some really ho-hum stories. Features Captain American (With John Romita art) and the G.A.Human Torch (with a touch of Sub-Mariner thrown in.
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