Qty:1
  • List Price: $28.00
  • Save: $2.80 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by -Daily Deals-
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This Book is in Good Condition. Used Copy With Light Amount of Wear. 100% Guaranteed.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A MYTH OF INNOCENCE (Foundations & Facets Series) Paperback – January 1, 1998


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$25.20
$21.20 $6.77
The%20Bible%20Store


Frequently Bought Together

A MYTH OF INNOCENCE (Foundations & Facets Series) + The Lost Gospel: The Book of Q and Christian Origins
Price for both: $36.24

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Foundations & Facets Series
  • Paperback: 456 pages
  • Publisher: Augsburg Fortress Publishers (January 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0800625498
  • ISBN-13: 978-0800625498
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,201,180 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A Myth of Innocence is surely one of the most important studies of the origins of Christianity since Schweitzer's Quest. With a single stroke, Burton Mack has shifted the investigation from the quest for a singular genesis to the perspective of the social history and imaginative labor documented in the texts." -- Ron Cameron, Wesleyan University

"A Myth of Innocence is the most penetrating historical work on the origins of Christianity written by an American scholar in this century. Its strikingly innovative feature is the recombination of literary and social histories, and the placement of diverse Jesus movements into their respective social contexts." -- Werner H. Kelber, The Catholic Biblical Quarterly

"This imaginative book is not just a study of the Gospel of Mark, but of primitive Christianity in all its variegated forms, for which it represents a new paradigm ... It deserves serious reflection and discussion at several levels, in a variety of contexts, by quite diversified discussion partners." -- James M. Robinson, Professor Emeritus, Claremont Graduate University

"This is an epic-making work because it turns scholarship on its head. Mack asks questions not about origins but about social meaning. The entire conception of what we want to know, why we want to know it, and how we shall find it out is new and compelling." -- Jacob Neusner, Bard College

About the Author

Burton L. was Professor of New Testament at Claremont School of Theology, and is the author of Rhetoric and the New Testament (Guides to Biblical Scholarship; Fortress Press, 1989); The Lost Gospel: The Book of Q and Christian Origins (1993); Who Wrote the New Testament? The Making of the Christian Myth (1995); and The Christian Myth: Origins, Logic, and Legacy (2001).

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 32 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
Mack is somewhat the bad boy of Jesus and Early Christian scholarship. Most Christians I know hate him. That is mainly because they haven't read his books. This book has a cover designed to irritate fundementalists. First it calls Christianity a Myth which is the correct word for any such tradition (just because it's a myth doesn't assume that it was made up). It also has a picture of a lion on the front which makes people believe that Mack is hostile towards the Christian myth. Not at all, in fact, the lion is from a seventh century Mosaic that depicts the four gospel writers and animals they represent, Luke is a person, Matthew I believe is an Ox, John is an eagle, and Mark is a Lion. Simple as that. Those who undertake to crack the cover and read this book will find it to be good scholarship and an exciting journey into the world of Mark. It is well informed and comes from one of New Testament scholarships most proific writers. Although Mack is now retired I sincerely hope he will continue writing, I will certainly continue reading his work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By George Eager on March 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
It's quite true, as one reviewer said, that Burton Mack's prose is in places needlessly impenetrable. But press on! His analysis of the Gospel of Mark is brilliant, and in its way, revolutionary. It certainly enhanced my appreciation for the literary achievement of the evangelist, and brought into sharp focus the structure and balance of the gospel. A good book to read along with Myth of Innocence is JD Crossan's Birth of Christianity. That too has some irksome stylistic features, but in terms of getting an interesting perspective on the material, these two books are very good.

Sometimes you just have to strap on the full armor of whoiwhatsit and slog through the swampy places to get to a higher vantage point.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 38 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 14, 2000
Format: Paperback
I completely disagree with Mack's conclusion that Christianity was 'made up' later. That said, his meticulous footnoting made a wonderful resource that I still look to for information and his research is thorough and engaging. His conclusion, relating a concoted Christianity to the evils of Reaganomics, is just plain wacky.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 50 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
Did Jesus create Christianity or did Christianity create Jesus? Traditional scholarship has assumed the former, Burton Mack seeks to prove the latter in his book A Myth of Innocence. This thought-provoking book takes up the question of Christian origins, focusing on the Gospel of Mark, the earliest of the Gospels. The author is not interested in otherworldly explanations for Christianity's emergence but in the social context which produced the earliest Christian literature. The forty years between Jesus death and Mark's Gospel account for the divergent images of Jesus in his Gospel. By the time Mark wrote his account there were various Jesus movements which can be categorized into two major traditions: "One stream was that of movements in Palestine and southern Syria that cultivated the memory of Jesus as a founder-teacher. The other was that of a congregation in northern Syria, Asia Minor and Greece wherein the death and resurrection of the Christ were regarded as the founding events"(11). Mark brought these two very different visions together in his Gospel.
In Mack's construction Jesus emerges as a Cynic-sage rather than an apocalyptic Jewish rabbi. Yet Mack gives no direct evidence that Jesus ever read or had contact with Cynics. Intellectual parallels do not prove influence. Mack's picking and choosing of passages which represent the "authentic" Jesus is at times arbitrary, and it seems that Mack has precluded predictive prophecy and miracle stories out of hand. Anything which doesn't suit Mack's image of Jesus is "myth" and Mark's "fabrication." For example, Mack writes "Mark can be shown to have exaggerated the power of Jesus to cast out demons for his own narrative purposes.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?