Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The Mabinogi and Other Medieval Welsh Tales Paperback – March 15, 1977

ISBN-13: 978-0520034143 ISBN-10: 0520034147 Edition: First Edition

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback, March 15, 1977
$9.54 $0.01 $3.50

There is a newer edition of this item:


Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 205 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press; First Edition edition (March 15, 1977)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520034147
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520034143
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #816,494 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Ford is one of the most eminent Celtic scholars of our day, and any contribution he makes to the field of Welsh criticism and letters is welcome and is bound to be significant. The present translation is no exception. -- World Literature Today

Language Notes

Text: English, Welsh (translation)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
17
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 20 customer reviews
The challenges of reading this book were worth the effort and I recommend reading it.
H. Kostecki
Not only is the translation a careful balance of scholarly accuracy and readable prose, but it has excellent introductory material as well.
Carl McColman
Even if you have another translation, read this one for Ford's notes, and for the not readily available "Tale of Gwion Bach."
Lisa L. Spangenberg

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Ian M. Slater TOP 1000 REVIEWER on January 30, 2005
Format: Paperback
Although at least one new translation of the collection of medieval Welsh narratives known as "The Mabinogion" has been announced (and parts are available on-line), Patrick K. Ford's "The Mabinogi, and Other Medieval Welsh Tales" is the most recent version to be published in book form, and, despite being a variant selection of material, is in some ways the most satisfactory. Patrick Ford gives a clear and vigorous rendering, with an excellent introduction and notes. He does not try to make the medieval texts sound up-to-date, but he doesn't strive for quaintness, either (the stories are quite strange enough!). Typically, he restores the correct "Mabinogi," instead of the enshrined scribal error in the nineteenth-century title of 'The Mabinogion." (According to Eric P. Hamp's "Mabinogi and Archaism," in "Celtica" Volume 23 [1999], even the manuscript form "mabinogi" is problematic for other reasons!)

I have reviewed the nineteenth-century translation by Lady Charlotte Guest, whose failure to recognize a scribal slip created the collective title of "Mabinogion" for a diverse group of tales, and the standard modern translation by Gwyn Jones and Thomas Jones, which, following a little-known predecessor from 1929, created the standard modern "canon" of these stories by dropping one of Charlotte Guest's selections, and evaluated these older translations there. The Jones and Jones list was followed in Jeffrey Gantz's translation for the Penguin Classics, which appeared about a year before Ford's translation of "The Mabinogi, and Other Medieval Welsh Tales," and I have discussed it briefly in comparison with the Jones and Jones version.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By inisglas@seanet.com on October 21, 1997
Format: Paperback
This is THE edition for the stories of Pwyll, Gwion Bach/Taliesin and Culwich and Olwen. The introduction and notes alone are worth the cover price. Translations are elegantly rendered, and Ford discusses the difficulties in explicating the history and meanings of the stories.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Mary F. Jones on December 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
Though he leaves out the decidedly more "literary" romances ("The Dream of Rhonabwy", "The Dream of Maxen", and the three retellings of Chretien de Troyes' Arthurian works), Ford's translation of the main cycle of Welsh mythology is without comparison. He is able to make the Four Branches come alive in a modern way, while preserving their magic.
Most important, however, are his notes, and his new translation of "Taliesin", the story of the famous Welsh bard. He uses a version older than the Guest edition, and tackles the difficult poetry to make it fully readable where he can. As for his notes, Ford makes excellent use of Indo-European scholarship, particularly the works of Georges Dumezil, to illustrate the primitive themes embedded in these late-medieval tales.
This volume should be on any medievalist's shelf.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By John L Murphy TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
How does the handsomely bound new rendering by Sioned Davies, Chair in Welsh at Cardiff, compare with the standard version often used and widely praised, Harvard professor Ford's? I consulted my 1977 copy as Ford's new printing has not yet been published. Will his "30th Anniversary" U of California paperback reissued edition find itself in a dead heat with Davies? The race may prove a photo finish!

I compared their translations of a favorite passage of mine early on in the First Branch, Pwyll's tale. Arawn's just been reunited with his queen after the year's test by unwitting yet steadfast doppelganger Pwyll. She wonders, post-coitally after a long year's lapse, why it's been so long since her husband made love with her.

Here's Ford (1977 ed., p. 41) first at the starting line.

"Shame on me," she said, "if from the time we went between the sheets there was even pleasure or talk between us or even your facing me-- much less anything more than that-- for the past year!"

And he thought, "Dear Lord God, it was a unique man, with strong and unwavering friendship that I got for a companion." And then he said to his wife, "Lady," he said, "don't blame me. I swear to God," he said, "I haven't slept with you since a year from last night nor have I lain with you."

And he told her the entire adventure.

"I confess to God," she said, "as far as fighting temptations of the flesh and keeping true to you goes, you had a solid hold on a fellow."

"Lady," he said, "that's just what I was thinking while I was silent with you."

"That was only natural," she answered.

--You can feel the hesitant insertion of the teller's dramatic pauses implied with the "saids." These intensify rhythms of the poet's strong, confident prose.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Dianne Foster HALL OF FAME on December 29, 2002
Format: Paperback
Once upon a time...the stories from childhood begin. Scholars now think fairy tales and many other stories are derived from more serious fables orally transmitted from generation to generation over thousands of years, until a redactor cast them into literary form. With the exception of the last two tales in Patrick K. Ford's translation of THE MABINOGI AND OTHER WELSH TALES, the stories in this book exist in manuscripts religious monks familiar with the `original' narratives prepared in the early part of the second millennium. For the most part these recorded versions appear to be relatively faithful to an oral tradition, however confused their narratives may at times seem to modern ears. In addition to recording the tales, the monks appear to have used the tales to transmit Christian notions, just as Christian missionaries to Hawaii explained the triune God using the sacred tripartite banana.
The last two tales in the MABINOGI were set down in the sixteenth century by one Elis Gruffydd, an educated man of Welsh extraction (The Tale of Gwion Bach, and The Tale of Taliesin"). Ford says that although no manuscript dating from an earlier era has turned up, it is apparent from the structure of the stories Gruffyd recorded that the two tales are very old and may have been copied in earlier times and the manuscripts lost. Gruffydd apparently was familiar with the oral versions of the tales which were still being retold in sixteenth century Wales which makes them all the more remarkable. events.
The tales of the Mabinogi set down in Ford's translation are somewhat interlinked, much as a set of short stories might be today, or as the stories of King Arthur and the Knights of the Roundtable were in the 12th Century.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa0da4ca8)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?