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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on January 30, 2010
I would second David Cotter's positive reviews. I only have a mere 20 years of development experience starting with a NeXT cube I bought back in 1990. Today I work for a 200b financial services company that runs twelve 10.4 Intel XServes. We are very cautious to upgrade as they machines are heavily used for production work in the marketing and reporting arm of the company where we heavily use Perl, AppleScript, shell scripts, Python, etc.. There has been perhaps 1-2 anomalies on individual machines that we had to reboot and do some repairs for - in perhaps 6 years of heavy use. We have hundreds of Windows, Solars and Linux servers, VMs, blades, network servers, you name it. Our 10.4 server reliability compares very well with the rest of our environment.

It was based on this experience I evaluated Snow Leopard Server by creating a Parallels 5 virtual machine on my Mac Pro desktop machine at home. I honestly wasn't sure it would work on a VM but I was running a live wiki/blog/calendar with people live connecting from all over for 2 weeks. There was one crash across a week of work - but I put my workstation running the VM to sleep several times and one of them the server didn't seem to wake up from correctly. That's tough environment for a server. I was very impressed with the improvement in management tools and the wiki is actually much better than the average wiki - my technical team that was testing it gave it rave reviews for usability.

I was so impressed that I decided to buy a Mac Mini Snow Leopard Server for my home. We aren't ready to upgrade at work yet - that will require several months of testing with a set of development servers. But based on my initial experience I would expect the testing to go fairly well.

I'm writing this somewhat preliminary review because that first guy was spewing hatred without any concrete facts and that's just rude. The fact is that with running a web server, blogs, e-mail, dns, open directory, file shares, etc. is very complex. Unlike reviews of simple products which might approach objectivity in some sense, complex products like server software can't be reviewed in an objective way. Reviews of OS X Server are going to be about how combining one particular guy with OS X Server for a while worked out. Apparently not very well for that first reviewer. My experience has been overall very good. Could be that the first guy is dumber than David Cotter or I, but it's probably because the kinds of things he was trying to do were not working out for him and the solutions were painful to find, if he could find them at all.

I understand this. Apple does not invest in the enterprise at all. The problems I've had with OS X Server are probably more difficult to resolve than on other platforms because of Apple's lack of interest, and the fact that far fewer people travel the OS X Server path. This results in far fewer hits in Google on your problem than you would expect with a Windows Server problem - tons of people have problems on Windows servers.

So here's my recommendation. If you are a computer novice that barely knows how to click a mouse but for some reason wants to set up a web server or wiki for your little company - OS X Server is DEFINITELY for you. It's actually ridiculously easy to set up most of the server features and if they work, which is likely, you are going to be very happy.

If you're moderately technical: 2-10 years of experience working with server technologies, or have a lot of experience but you just aren't that good, then you probably want to use a Windows server technology. You'll have lots of support, lots of stuff on the web, a broad range of software solutions, and there is a contractor around every corner that can help you out.

If you have a ton of experience and the most daunting technical problems don't really phase you any more (they might take days to fix, but they don't phase you), then I think you will really like OS X Server. You're going to need all that experience because Apple, or the few other OS X Server users out there, are not going to be able to back you up much. If you combine this experience with the right kind of use then OS X Server is a joy to use and is highly recommended. Hope that helps.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on February 7, 2010
Verified Purchase
Mac OS X 10.6 Server comes pre-configured with file, print, mail, chat, Web, wiki, blog and many other services. Install it on an Intel-based Macintosh, check a few preference panels, and you are up and running. An astonishing amount of power is bundled into that one small cardboard box.

The included documentation is adequate to get you up and running, but nothing more. If you don't know what a wiki is or why you'd want one, you won't find out here. Apple's assumption is that you probably won't read what little documentation is provided (probably true) and will look for books on Apache if you are interested in the Web, books on digital video if you are interested in Podcast Producer, books on SMTP and Internet mail services if you want to use the mail server, etc.

Note that this is not some cut-down "home" edition: Mac OS X 10.6 Server offers unlimited clients. "Unlimited" clients on a comparable Windows server would cost tens of thousands of dollars, not to mention hundreds of hours to configure and fairly constant maintenance. Linux distributions come closest to matching Snow Leopard Server, but in the case of Linux, you tend to get bits and pieces, "some assembly required," and batteries are not included. Just collecting the various services to install on top of Linux and resolving conflicts could take several weeks; installing Mac OS X 10.6 Server takes about an hour, with an additional couple of hours tinkering with configuration settings and tweaking.

While I didn't try it, you can also get Snow Leopard Server pre-installed on a Mac mini. The cost is very low ($999 list), and obviously the installation time is even less.

Installation is easy, tracking down incompatibilities is unnecessary, configuration is simplicity itself. Highly recommended.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on December 3, 2009
Well, i too have been a developer for over 25 years (omg coming up on 30), for a very large company that you've heard of. The above guy spits out a bunch of bile but does not back up his claims with any hard facts, perhaps he's just having a bad day. In my experience, SL fixed several problems and bad designs in Leopard. The upgrade was the most painless ever, it "just worked". This upgrade adds polish and shine to many parts of the system. I have not had one instability. Not even one.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on February 28, 2014
This is the last version of Mac OS to support Rosetta (for running PowerPPC applications). It is also the only such version that can be run (without hacking around a bit) under an emulator like Fusion. As of early 2014, ut is no longer supported by Apple in the sense of getting its bugs and security flaws fixed, but it is being sold if you call the Apple Store 800 number and place a phone order. The price is $20, plus shipping and handling. When you order, be as clear as you can, as not every one at the Apple Store recognizes the difference between the sever version and the client version. You want the SERVER version of 10.6 or you will not be able to run it on an emulator. (If you have old hardware, it doesn't make a difference, but old hardware doesn't last forever.) If they don't seem to get it, repeat the word SERVER and tell them it is very important not to get the client version.

I've been running a few old applications under 10.6 under 10.8 and it works very well. I also made a point of running a Rosetta application early since 10.6 downloads Rosetta from Apple. As of early 2014, this still worked, but Apple may not provide this service indefinitely.

To be honest, I much prefer 10.8 and 10.9 to 10.6, but having a 10.6 image around that I can emulate is a great arrow to have in my system and archive maintenance quiver.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on March 4, 2010
Verified Purchase
A great server -- I've seen none better that could be used in your home.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on December 14, 2010
Verified Purchase
My suggestion is to buy the Mac Mini Server. I bought the software then later bought a Mac Mini without server. Mistake but oh well.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on February 22, 2013
You can buy OSX Server (Mountain Lion, Unlimited Clients) from the App Store for $49, so why pay as much as $200?
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on December 4, 2010
I received a copy in French, which I kept and tried to install anyway, as the software itself is multi-language. The serial number came up as invalid and that it was used on another server though, and now I get to deal with the 3rd party seller to try and work things out. Fun. This is why I hate buying things from Amazon that aren't actually from Amazon.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on November 17, 2010
Verified Purchase
I am unable to write a good review for this product because I received a non-English version of the software. Amazon has instructed me to return the item and reorder due to the fact that the software came from American Media Soft instead of directly from Amazon.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on November 20, 2010
Verified Purchase
Seller "American Media Soft" shipped French version instead of English, despite this product page saying the product is for US shipment only.
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