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Macedonian Warrior: Alexander's Elite Infantryman Paperback – April 25, 2006


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Macedonian Warrior: Alexander's Elite Infantryman + Granicus 334BC: Alexander's First Persian Victory (Campaign) + The Army of Alexander the Great (Men at Arms Series, 148)
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Product Details

  • Series: Warrior (Book 103)
  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing (April 25, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1841769509
  • ISBN-13: 978-1841769509
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 0.2 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #317,492 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Insights into the real lives of history's fighting men, packed with full colour illustrations, highly detailed cutaways, exploded artwork of weaponry and armour, and action-packed battle scenes.

About the Author

Waldemar Heckel is Professor of Ancient History at the University of Calgary, Canada. His publications include numerous articles on the history of Alexander the Great. Together with John Yardley he has produced the Penguin edition of 'Quintus Curtius Rufus: The History of Alexander' (1984) and most recently, 'Livy: The Dawn of the Roman Empire' for Oxford World's Classics (2000).

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Customer Reviews

A second type of issue is that author does not explicitly acknowledge and treat as such the assumptions he makes.
JPS
When buying this book I was hoping it would put a little more focus on the battle tactics of the phalanx, its manoeuvers, strengths, weaknessess, etc.
olamaan
Angus McBride is my favorite artist with Osprey but I would easy purchase another book with Ms Hooks illustrations.
Hannibal

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Hannibal on May 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
After reading an initial review of this book on this site I was a bit hesitant to waste my $15 but I went for it anyway. I am sure glad that I took a chance. The book is excellent. Very little has been written about Alexander's foot soldiers (cavalry was his specialty) and what exists from 2000+ years ago is plagued with contradictions and inaccuracies. It is nice to see a modern text try to explain/sort out some of the confusion. I wish the book would have been longer- maybe a future project for the author?

I found nothing wrong with the artwork and was pleasantly suprised with some of the details which were visible in her plates. Angus McBride is my favorite artist with Osprey but I would easy purchase another book with Ms Hooks illustrations.

My only complaint is the way that the author-and many other historians- ends his history of the Macedonian foot soldier with their defeat by a Roman army at Pydna in 168BC. The Macedonian phalanx of 168BC was a shadow of the great formation that Philip and Alexander used to conquer the known world. The 150 years between Alexander and the Romans was not well spent by Macedon and the Diodochi and a decay of tactics and improvements took place. Alexander the Great was a military visionary with a flexible force always in flux. He adapted his forces to meet the demands of both the enemy and the terrain. Others "borrowed" his armies, lands, and power but the real Macedonian warrior died in the summer of 323 when Alexander passed away in Babylon.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Jones on May 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
For many of us who are fans of the Osprey series books, Angus Mcbride's uninspired illustrations in the previous Macedonian books are thankfully updated in this volume on the subject. Contray to earlier criticisms, Christa Hook's illustrations give a realistic feel to the images drawn. They are very life like, and are exactly what I was hoping for in the illustrations on the Macedonian imfantry.

I for one am glad to see that the old school, blocky and oftimes cartoony images of McBride's are being updated. I am not an illusrator, but my work with ancient arms and armour has made me long desire a decent representation of the equipment used by the Macedonian soldiers. I hope that people will also attmept to read the body text to draw a conclusion on the material covered, as well to better understand what it is the plates are illustrating. There are many new ideas about the function and effectiveness of Alexander's army presented in this volume that are sure to please and perhaps spark debate amoung lovers of macedonian arms.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nadia Azumi on March 30, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A book that details the infantry,as well as the entire history, and army of Alexander the Great.The pictures and explanation of the army,the sarissas,the terminology,not to mention the physical impact is very well written.

You can certainly visualize the battles and what the soldiers went through looking and reading at this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Murphy on March 29, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It seems as though most sources on the Alexandrian conquests focus on Alexander's enemies, Alexander's cavalry, or Alexander. The infantry rarely receive any attention, but as in any army, they formed the backbone of his fighting forces and he could not have waged his wars without them. This book focuses solely on them, detailing their origins, tactics, and even their personal lives. This book also helps to clear up the identity of the hypastists. Christa Hook's plates are also wonderful.
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By JPS TOP 500 REVIEWER on May 10, 2013
Format: Paperback
This is a mostly good Osprey title from an author (Waldemar Heckel) who is one of the leading specialists on Alexander and the Successors. The introduction, which manages to summarizes some three centuries of Greek history and warfare in a bit less than four pages while mentioning the main points is quite remarkable and impressive.
The sections mentioning the living conditions of Alexander's infantrymen and the huge hardships that they bore when following him across the Persian Empire and back again are well described and not often mentioned in other books. They seem to have largely drawn from a book written by a French historian (Paul Faure) published some thirty years ago and focusing on the daily life of Alexander's army. Contrary to some other Osprey titles on the Macedonians (those of Nick Sekunda, in particular), this title is more balanced, more complete and also includes a piece on the phalanx in battle, rather than focusing almost exclusively on organization, structure and numbers.

There are, however, a number of issues with this title. While these are more "glitches" than major problems, there are sufficient in number to have a negative impact and reduce the quality of this title.

A first set of problems is suggested by the subtitle of this book which is about "Alexander's elite infantryman". This infantryman did not "come out of the blue" and was not raised and trained by Alexander, but by his father Philip, but the author has comparatively little to see about Philippe and even less about the Macedonian infantry's considerable and mostly stellar performances during his reign.
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